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NEWS
January 15, 2012
Regarding your recent article about the continuing violence in Iraq, it's disturbing that it and many similar pieces all followed President Obama's Dec. 2010 announcement that all American troops would be withdrawn from Iraq by the end of 2011 ("Blasts targeting pilgrims kill 15, injure 52 in Iraq," Jan.10). It's quite obvious that the president's action was nothing more than a political ploy to position himself in a more favorable position for re-election in 2012. Unfortunately, Mr. Obama's announcement also created the chaotic situation the articles describe.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
Legg Mason Inc. reported Thursday its quarterly profit grew 51 percent, thanks to a strategy that has diversified the money manager's investment portfolio. The Baltimore-based company said it earned $72.2 million, or 61 cents per share, in the three months ended June 30, compared with $47.8 million, or 38 cents per share, a year earlier. Revenue for the quarter rose 4 percent to $693.9 million. While Legg Mason announced in May it had reversed a six-year outflow of client money, the recent quarter brought a net outflow of $8.2 billion, nearly all from liquid investments such as money market funds.
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NEWS
By THOMAS R. MATTAIR | October 27, 2005
Iraq has not turned out as we wanted. The government is led by religious Shiites along with Kurds, not by secular Shiites more willing to cooperate with the minority Sunnis who ruled Iraq under Saddam Hussein. The new constitution calls for a weak central government that gives too much autonomy to the Shiites in the south, where most of Iraq's oil is, and to Kurds in the north. The Sunnis voted against the constitution and the Sunni insurgency will continue in part because oil-poor Sunnis do not expect an adequate share of Iraq's oil revenues under this arrangement.
NEWS
By Dane Egli | July 27, 2014
The violence erupting on the former battlefields of Operation Iraqi Freedom coupled with the planned withdrawal from Afghanistan raises new concerns over the recent exchange of five Taliban commanders for U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. The swap conflicted with traditional hostage recovery policy and trading of war prisoners and may lead our enemies to conclude that we're now willing to negotiate with kidnappers - potentially endangering lives abroad. Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, leader of the self-proclaimed Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, was himself an insurgent detainee released by the U.S. in 2009.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau Staff writers Charles W. Corddry and Richard H. P. Sia contributed to this article | January 19, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Forcing the White House to renew its search for a new defense secretary, retired Adm. Bobby Ray Inman publicly withdrew his nomination yesterday at an extraordinary news conference in which he accused a columnist and Senate Republicans of plotting against him.In a rambling, often contradictory statement in Austin, Texas, the former deputy CIA director complained of a climate of "modern McCarthyism" and said that he was withdrawing his name...
NEWS
June 2, 2012
The more I read about Afghanistan, the more concerned I become about the contending factions faced by President Hamid Karzai's government and the American forces trying to support it. We have spent $471 million to complete the Afghanistan Dam project, begun in the early 1950s to provide electricity, and the $6 billion we have spent over the past decade to combat the opium trade has helped finance the insurgency and fueled government corruption....
NEWS
By Derek Chollet | August 30, 2005
WASHINGTON - The debate over what to do about Iraq, with August being one of the bloodiest months for U.S. forces since the invasion nearly 2 1/2 years ago, has reached new heights. President Bush is under intense pressure from media criticism and an energized antiwar movement inspired by military mom Cindy Sheehan. His poll numbers are dropping, and his vaunted message machine has suffered a rare setback. Yet much of the talk among Washington insiders is about the disarray within the Democratic Party, whose leaders are blamed for failing to present a unified opposition or not offering clear alternatives to the mess in Iraq.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | July 1, 1993
Los Angeles. -- This city, transformed in a generation from a shimmering symbol of possibilities to a dark portent, now has a new mayor, Richard Riordan, 63, a nominal Republican whose problems begin with the civic culture itself.When Mayor Tom Bradley was elected in 1973, 674,555 people voted. Since then the city has grown by almost that many, but this year only 598,436 voted. A city where 40 percent of all households have unlisted telephone numbers is experiencing a great withdrawal -- from public life, including public schools, into gated neighborhoods, or just indoors, or to suburbs.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | December 6, 1990
LONDON -- Gen. Colin L. Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said yesterday that the United States would settle for nothing short of "total, total withdrawal" of Iraq from Kuwait to resolve the Persian Gulf crisis.Rejecting partial Iraqi withdrawal as a basis of a peaceful settlement, he said, "Saddam Hussein better take into his calculus that the American leadership is not going to blink on this until the last Iraqi soldier leaves Kuwait."Addressing the Royal United Services Institute for Defense Studies in London, the general said he continued to hope that the crisis could be resolved by diplomacy, the use of sanctions and "the opprobrium of world opinion."
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | February 1, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Jack Kemp's decision against running for president next year leaves a conspicuous vacuum in the field of Republican candidates.The former New York congressman and Cabinet member had enormous appeal to those conservative Republican activists who thought the party should put its emphasis on using government to promote economic growth rather than on simply reducing the government role in American life. And he brought to national politics more positive energy and optimism than any of those now in the field of potential presidential candidates.
NEWS
June 25, 2014
President Barack Obama's 300 advisers in Iraq will gather information for drone strikes against Sunni forces advancing on Baghdad ( "Obama's Iraq mistake," June 21). Were this a rear guard action to facilitate withdrawal of U.S. troops, that would make sense. However, the troops are already gone Attacking Iraq again will not contribute anything toward stabilizing Iraq. It will only forestall the inevitable internal struggles, recriminations and atrocities among Iraqi religious, sectional and political factions.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | February 16, 2014
Running Centrowitz withdraws from Wanamaker Mile World silver medalist Matthew Centrowitz , a Broadneck alumnus, withdrew from the Wanamaker Mile at the Millrose Games on Saturday in New York because of an upper respiratory problem. U.S. champion Will Leer put on a brilliant closing kick to overtake Lawi Lalang and Nick Willis and win the featured race in a season-leading time of 3 minutes, 52.47 seconds. Boxing Taylor loses Friday in N.Y. by unanimous decision Emanuel "The Tranzformer" Taylor lost by unanimous decision to undefeated Chris Algieri on Friday in a nationally televised 10-round bout in Huntington, N.Y. Taylor, of Edgewood, trains at Charm City Boxing in White Marsh.
NEWS
By Jay Bernstein | January 2, 2014
Over 200 years ago, political theorist and philosopher Edmund Burke memorably remarked: "The only thing necessary for evil to flourish is for good men to do nothing. " This truism comes to mind when assessing the reaction of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County to the recent vote by the American Studies Association (ASA) in favor of an academic boycott of Israel. The ASA, of which UMBC is an institutional member, is the nation's oldest and largest association dedicated to the interdisciplinary study of American history and culture.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 2, 2013
When the withdrawal of American troops from Afghanistan is completed next year what will happen to Afghan women? Will a resurgent Taliban return them to wearing burqas, withdraw them from schools and force them to live behind painted glass in their homes, permitting them to leave the house only when accompanied by a blood relative? The Afghan constitution contains language that supposedly protects women's rights, and Afghanistan has signed several international human rights treaties that guarantee protection for women.
BUSINESS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2013
Maryland gambling control officials said Tuesday they're "concerned" about allegations in other states involving the company building Baltimore's casino, Caesars Entertainment Corp. Caesars said Monday that one of its Las Vegas businesses is the subject of a federal investigation into money laundering and that it was pulling out of a $1 billion casino venture in Massachusetts amid concerns in that state about an investor's possible ties to organized crime. "The Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Agency is concerned about these alleged incidents and how they impact our mission of ensuring that commercial gambling in Maryland promotes integrity, transparency and fair play," said Stephen Martino, director of the Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Agency.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Driven by a surge of opposition from people who live in Southwest Baltimore, several city leaders have withdrawn support for a major CSX Transportation rail facility proposed for the area. Until recently, the project moved smoothly through early planning stages, after Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake invited CSX to locate the facility - viewed as critical for the Port of Baltimore - in the city. City Councilman Edward Reisinger, who represents the Morrell Park neighborhood where the facility is proposed to go, said his position "evolved" after CSX officials showed what he characterized as a lack of respect for the community by failing to answer questions or address concerns.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 8, 1994
ZAGREB, Croatia -- In a warning to the factions in Bosnia that the time for a settlement is running out, France announced yesterday that it had asked the United Nations and NATO to draw up detailed plans for the withdrawal of peacekeepers from the war-ravaged country."
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,THE PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | July 16, 2000
I have turned 70 as of March 15 this year. I think I have until April 1 of next year to start drawing a specified amount on my IRA. If I'm correct on this, I'd appreciate an answer. You're right, but waiting can trigger tax complications. An Individual Retirement Account (IRA) offers tax breaks to encourage you to save for retirement. In general, the only time the money in your account is taxed is when you withdraw it. With a traditional IRA, you must begin withdrawing at least a minimum amount each year, starting about the time you turn 70 1/2 . Technically, you must begin these withdrawals by April 1 of the year after the year in which you reach 70 1/2 . Some people wait until then to make their first withdrawal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
The owners of Michael's Cafe in Timonium said Tuesday they will not pursue a restaurant in Federal Hill. "We have decided that we can not alter the brand and image of Michael's Cafe," said Steven Dellis, a spokesman for his family's restaurant. Citing issues involving occupancy limits and parking, neighborhood groups in Federal Hill were opposing a liquor license transfer that would have allowed the Dellis family to operate an establishment at the corner of South Charles and West Cross streets.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
After stealing a fellow rider's phone on a Maryland Transit Administration bus in Baltimore this summer, three men forced the man to exit the bus and withdraw cash from an ATM in order to get the phone back, according to MTA Police. Now, police are asking for the public's help identifying the three men they believe were involved in the armed robbery, in which a gun and a knife were displayed to intimidate the victim. The robbery occurred about 5:55 p.m. on Aug. 4, after the victim boarded a No. 40 bus in Woodlawn and began riding it into the city, police said this week.
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