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Witching Hour

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NEWS
July 7, 1994
When the clock struck 9 p.m. on Tuesday, political office-seekers in Maryland had reached their witching hour -- the moment of truth when it was put up or shut up: either put your money up as a filing fee, or sit out this year's election. A record number of candidates filed with the state elections board, ensuring major changes in the composition of the state legislature and a number of county councils.Confusion reigned in the race for governor, though. Lt. Gov. Melvin Steinberg's campaign continued to perform as though under a magic spell.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
The Miami Dolphins gave the Ravens a Halloween treat on Thursday night, scoring a strange 22-20 overtime victory that ended when Cincinnati Bengals quarterback Andy Dalton was sacked in the end zone by Cam Wake for a walk-off safety. It was only the third time in NFL history an overtime game had ended on a safety. The fact that it happened right before midnight, on the scariest day of the year, made it that much more delicious. More importantly for the Ravens, it was the first time the Bengals have been defeated since they lost to the Browns on Sept.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
The Miami Dolphins gave the Ravens a Halloween treat on Thursday night, scoring a strange 22-20 overtime victory that ended when Cincinnati Bengals quarterback Andy Dalton was sacked in the end zone by Cam Wake for a walk-off safety. It was only the third time in NFL history an overtime game had ended on a safety. The fact that it happened right before midnight, on the scariest day of the year, made it that much more delicious. More importantly for the Ravens, it was the first time the Bengals have been defeated since they lost to the Browns on Sept.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN REPORTER | February 3, 2006
DETROIT -- The witching hour is almost here. Time for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Seattle Seahawks to show whether they have the stuff of champions. No, it's not the Super Bowl. Super Bowl Steelers (14-5) vs. Seahawks (15-3); Sunday, 6:23 p.m., chs. 2, 7 Line: Steelers by 4
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN REPORTER | February 3, 2006
DETROIT -- The witching hour is almost here. Time for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Seattle Seahawks to show whether they have the stuff of champions. No, it's not the Super Bowl. Super Bowl Steelers (14-5) vs. Seahawks (15-3); Sunday, 6:23 p.m., chs. 2, 7 Line: Steelers by 4
BUSINESS
September 18, 1992
Witching hour on Wall StreetStock prices were mixed today as the market churned through a quarterly triple witching hour.The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials slipped .27 to 3,315.43 in the first half hour of trading. Gainers outpaced losers by about 5 to 3 in nationwide trading of New York Stock Exchange-listed issues. Volume on the Big Board came to 61.61 million shares as of 10 a.m.As usual at witching hours, activity was sharply increased by last-minute transactions of professionals involving expiring options and futures on stock indexes and individual stocks.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Staff Writer | September 28, 1993
BOOK REVIEWTitle: "Lasher"Author: Anne RicePublisher: KnopfLength, price: 583 pages, $25 First it was vampires. Now it is witches.Just as Anne Rice has kept the story of Lestat alive in the "Vampire Chronicles," she is continuing to breathe life into the Mayfair clan with her newest novel, "Lasher," a fast-paced follow-up to "The Witching Hour.""Lasher" doesn't have to act as a sequel, though. It functions fine as an introduction to the Mayfairs, a dynasty of witches who are anything but stereotypical crones.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Bledsoe and Suzanne Bledsoe,Ms. Bledsoe is assistant features editor of The Sun | December 9, 1990
The Witching Hour.Anne Rice.Knopf.965 pages. $22.95.Forget Shakespeare and the gloomy foreboding of "Double, double toil and trouble" -- the witches in Anne Rice's novels definitely are not "Hamlet" hags. They are beautiful women who through the vagaries of the birth order become part of the Mayfair family legacy that jumps from Scotland in the 1600s to the Caribbean to modern-day New Orleans.Despite the "accidents" and death that often befall their enemies, we can't help but care about these witches, who often seem perplexed about how to deal with their psychic powers.
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler | October 29, 1993
THE WITCHING HOUR:THE WITCHING HOUR: Ghosts and goblins -- and pirates -- will be on the harbor area's byways this weekend. Here are some things you can do while looking for things that go bump for Halloween:* Stuff a scarecrow. Breathe life into a bundle of straw from noon to 2 p.m. tomorrow at the Harborplace Amphitheater. All materials -- including straw, twine, shirts, glue and plastic googly eyes -- will be provided. The first 100 people will get to create the figures. (Latecomers can watch.
FEATURES
By LAURA CHARLES | November 3, 1991
SINGER TONY BENNETT took some time off from performing with the BSO last weekend to renew old friendships and take in the sights.After Friday night's performance, Bennett dropped by the Harvey House to chat with owner Lou Baumel about his days as a young crooner.Seems the singer, then virtually unknown, worked here for Baumel 40 years ago when Baumel owned the old Club Charles at Charles and Preston.Bennett needed a couple of days off from his two-week, $250-per stint to make a record. The rest, they say, is history.
FEATURES
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 23, 2003
Long after the dogs and cats were called home last Friday night, after the curtains were drawn and the windows went dark - Roland Park fell silent. Except for the rustle of a slight summer breeze, everything was still. And everything, it seemed, was ordinary. Then, exactly five minutes before midnight, things in the leafy North Baltimore neighborhood took a peculiar turn. The doors of the Children's Bookstore on Deepdene Road flew open, and out of the tiny shop burst 17 men, women and teen-agers, arms filled with cardboard boxes and plastic bags.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
To celebrate Halloween, Carroll County towns and shopping centers have planned trick-or-treating times and other activities, including: Westminster: Trick-or-treat- ing from dusk until 8 p.m. today inside city limits. Children age 12 and younger can make the rounds with a parent or adult guardian. Trick-or-treaters are encouraged to wear light-colored clothing for safety. Residents wishing to participate should turn on porch lights. Information: 410-848-9000. Sykesville: Trick-or-treating will be allowed from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. today.
NEWS
July 7, 1994
When the clock struck 9 p.m. on Tuesday, political office-seekers in Maryland had reached their witching hour -- the moment of truth when it was put up or shut up: either put your money up as a filing fee, or sit out this year's election. A record number of candidates filed with the state elections board, ensuring major changes in the composition of the state legislature and a number of county councils.Confusion reigned in the race for governor, though. Lt. Gov. Melvin Steinberg's campaign continued to perform as though under a magic spell.
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler | October 29, 1993
THE WITCHING HOUR:THE WITCHING HOUR: Ghosts and goblins -- and pirates -- will be on the harbor area's byways this weekend. Here are some things you can do while looking for things that go bump for Halloween:* Stuff a scarecrow. Breathe life into a bundle of straw from noon to 2 p.m. tomorrow at the Harborplace Amphitheater. All materials -- including straw, twine, shirts, glue and plastic googly eyes -- will be provided. The first 100 people will get to create the figures. (Latecomers can watch.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | October 22, 1993
The TV Repairman:As Toronto manager Cito Gaston, one of those people who apparently can catch 40 winks with his eyes open, gazed at his first two pitchers, Todd Stottlemyre and Al Leiter, throwing in unbelievably inept manner Wednesday night, CBS announcer Sean McDonough pointed out how Gaston had a reputation for being "very patient" with his pitchers.Uh, Sean, the proper word to cover the situation would have been comatose.When one puts out as many words as Tim McCarver does during a telecast, a lot of them are bound to be unnecessary, superfluous and downright inane.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Staff Writer | September 28, 1993
BOOK REVIEWTitle: "Lasher"Author: Anne RicePublisher: KnopfLength, price: 583 pages, $25 First it was vampires. Now it is witches.Just as Anne Rice has kept the story of Lestat alive in the "Vampire Chronicles," she is continuing to breathe life into the Mayfair clan with her newest novel, "Lasher," a fast-paced follow-up to "The Witching Hour.""Lasher" doesn't have to act as a sequel, though. It functions fine as an introduction to the Mayfairs, a dynasty of witches who are anything but stereotypical crones.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | October 22, 1993
The TV Repairman:As Toronto manager Cito Gaston, one of those people who apparently can catch 40 winks with his eyes open, gazed at his first two pitchers, Todd Stottlemyre and Al Leiter, throwing in unbelievably inept manner Wednesday night, CBS announcer Sean McDonough pointed out how Gaston had a reputation for being "very patient" with his pitchers.Uh, Sean, the proper word to cover the situation would have been comatose.When one puts out as many words as Tim McCarver does during a telecast, a lot of them are bound to be unnecessary, superfluous and downright inane.
FEATURES
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 23, 2003
Long after the dogs and cats were called home last Friday night, after the curtains were drawn and the windows went dark - Roland Park fell silent. Except for the rustle of a slight summer breeze, everything was still. And everything, it seemed, was ordinary. Then, exactly five minutes before midnight, things in the leafy North Baltimore neighborhood took a peculiar turn. The doors of the Children's Bookstore on Deepdene Road flew open, and out of the tiny shop burst 17 men, women and teen-agers, arms filled with cardboard boxes and plastic bags.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1992
Witching hour on Wall StreetStock prices were mixed today as the market churned through a quarterly triple witching hour.The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials slipped .27 to 3,315.43 in the first half hour of trading. Gainers outpaced losers by about 5 to 3 in nationwide trading of New York Stock Exchange-listed issues. Volume on the Big Board came to 61.61 million shares as of 10 a.m.As usual at witching hours, activity was sharply increased by last-minute transactions of professionals involving expiring options and futures on stock indexes and individual stocks.
FEATURES
By LAURA CHARLES | November 3, 1991
SINGER TONY BENNETT took some time off from performing with the BSO last weekend to renew old friendships and take in the sights.After Friday night's performance, Bennett dropped by the Harvey House to chat with owner Lou Baumel about his days as a young crooner.Seems the singer, then virtually unknown, worked here for Baumel 40 years ago when Baumel owned the old Club Charles at Charles and Preston.Bennett needed a couple of days off from his two-week, $250-per stint to make a record. The rest, they say, is history.
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