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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Evening Sun Staff | May 31, 1991
ON A 95-degree afternoon, Kestryl Angell and Cheryl Costa re-enact a hallowed summer ritual: Spread out on a picnic blanket, they pour Kool-aid, dispense ginger snaps, brush away ants and thread a conversation through the demands of Angell's two young daughters. It's no small feat, considering that they are trying to explain the basics of their pagan religion.Next week the two priestesses from Laurel will launch "Kestryl & Company," the country's first cable television talk show devoted to witchcraft or "Wicca" to its practitioners.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
Georg H.B. Luck, whose career teaching the classics at the Johns Hopkins University spanned two decades and included studying the role magic and witchcraft played in the theology and world of the ancient Greeks and Romans, died Sunday from complications of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 87 and a longtime resident of the city's Poplar Hill neighborhood. "Georg was a modest man who had great gusto for the things that interested him," said Richard A. Macksey, a noted Baltimore bibliophile and professor of humanities at Hopkins.
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NEWS
November 20, 2004
Cy Coleman, 75, composer of the standards "Witchcraft" and "The Best Is Yet To Come" died of heart failure Thursday in New York. The co-writer of Sweet Charity and other Broadway hits, he was one of the last great jazz-trained veterans of the Broadway musical. Born Seymour Kaufman on June 14, 1929, the son of Russian immigrants, Mr. Coleman's early prowess at the keyboard, as he recounted often, impressed the milkman, who mentioned the young prodigy to his son's piano teacher. He met the teacher, began formal training and made his Carnegie Hall debut at age 7. He was renowned for the finger-snapping cool of "Witchcraft," "I've Got Your Number," and "Hey, Big Spender."
NEWS
November 20, 2004
Cy Coleman, 75, composer of the standards "Witchcraft" and "The Best Is Yet To Come" died of heart failure Thursday in New York. The co-writer of Sweet Charity and other Broadway hits, he was one of the last great jazz-trained veterans of the Broadway musical. Born Seymour Kaufman on June 14, 1929, the son of Russian immigrants, Mr. Coleman's early prowess at the keyboard, as he recounted often, impressed the milkman, who mentioned the young prodigy to his son's piano teacher. He met the teacher, began formal training and made his Carnegie Hall debut at age 7. He was renowned for the finger-snapping cool of "Witchcraft," "I've Got Your Number," and "Hey, Big Spender."
NEWS
By Alice Hoffman | April 8, 1994
IF WE were to put our faith in the West Valley School Board of Kalispell, Mont., we might be convinced that there are witches in that part of the state.Certainly, there is one woman who has handed out books and knowledge, to mere children, and it looks as if some may consider such acts black magic.In following the American Library Association policy that librarians are duty bound to obtain requested material without regard to bias or personal judgment, Debbie Denzer, an assistant librarian who had worked at the West Valley School for a little more than a year, made the sort of mistake you can't afford to make around there.
NEWS
October 25, 1998
Religious freedom is important part of school 'hex' caseIn regard to the article "Student suspended for 'hex' " (Oct. 21), Southwestern High Alpha Academy Principal Earl L. Lee is obviously and admittedly ignorant about Jamie Schoonover's religion. But he goes further and says he finds it bizarre that one of his students admits to practicing witchcraft.This implies that he expects that anyone practicing witchcraft should keep it a secret, presumably because it is reprehensible. That shows a profound, if perhaps unconscious and unintended disrespect.
FEATURES
By David Arnold and David Arnold,Boston Globe | February 4, 1992
SALEM, Mass IT WAS MID-JANUARY of 1692, before the Age of Reason, when about a dozen girls stifled by the rigors of Puritanism started gathering in a kitchen for a bit of naughty talk and inadvertently launched the Salem witchcraft hysteria.Before the panic subsided and townfolk acknowledged wrong, 20 women and men accused of witchcraft would be dead from hanging or "pressing," while at least another three would die in prison."Such was the darkness of the day ..." the Rev. John Hale of Beverly, Mass.
NEWS
By Tom Wicker | December 2, 1991
THERE MAY BE an ominous link between White House efforts to reinterpret the Civil Rights Act of 1991 and President Bush's veto of the so-called "gag rule" bill for doctors practicing in federally financed clinics. Congress first authorized such clinics in 1970, though it specifically banned use of federal funds to perform abortions. Nearly two decades later, in 1988, the Reagan adminTomWickeristration issued a new interpretation of the 1970 legislation, ruling that doctors in the clinics could not even discuss abortion with a pregnant woman or refer her to a doctor who could.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria R. Sirota and By Victoria R. Sirota,Special to the Sun | March 12, 2000
"The Triumph of the Moon: A History of Modern Pagan Witchcraft," by Ronald Hutton. Oxford University Press. 470 pages. $32.50. As an Episcopal priest, I opened the first pages of "The Triumph of the Moon" with great trepidation. What would I find? My Judeo-Christian background had instilled in me a fear of pagan witchcraft as anti-God and pro-Satan. On the other hand, more recent feminist writers have suggested that the branding and killing of millions of intelligent and independent-minded women had been a significant manifestation of cultural misogyny.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria R. Sirota and By Victoria R. Sirota,Special to the Sun | September 8, 2002
In the Devil's Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692, by Mary Beth Norton. Knopf. 432 pages. $30. Contemporary American culture has sanitized and popularized witchcraft. Newspaper horoscopes, Harry Potter and the commercialization of Halloween have turned evil into a commodity. Salem, Mass., has become a theme park. It has been more than 300 years since the Salem witch trials in which 19 people were hanged, one was pressed to death and legal action was taken against more than a hundred others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria R. Sirota and By Victoria R. Sirota,Special to the Sun | September 8, 2002
In the Devil's Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692, by Mary Beth Norton. Knopf. 432 pages. $30. Contemporary American culture has sanitized and popularized witchcraft. Newspaper horoscopes, Harry Potter and the commercialization of Halloween have turned evil into a commodity. Salem, Mass., has become a theme park. It has been more than 300 years since the Salem witch trials in which 19 people were hanged, one was pressed to death and legal action was taken against more than a hundred others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 19, 2000
A slight, impish Lady Macbeth? Not so outlandish with Pippa Pearthree in the role. Nearly 20 years ago, when Pippa Pearthree was playing Ophelia in Joseph Papp's production of "Hamlet" at the New York Shakespeare Festival, the late great impresario told her: "The part for you is going to be Lady Macbeth." Now Center Stage is giving her a chance to see if Papp was right. Beginning Friday, Pearthree will be the one urging Macbeth (played by Ritchie Coster) to "screw your courage to the sticking place."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria R. Sirota and By Victoria R. Sirota,Special to the Sun | March 12, 2000
"The Triumph of the Moon: A History of Modern Pagan Witchcraft," by Ronald Hutton. Oxford University Press. 470 pages. $32.50. As an Episcopal priest, I opened the first pages of "The Triumph of the Moon" with great trepidation. What would I find? My Judeo-Christian background had instilled in me a fear of pagan witchcraft as anti-God and pro-Satan. On the other hand, more recent feminist writers have suggested that the branding and killing of millions of intelligent and independent-minded women had been a significant manifestation of cultural misogyny.
FEATURES
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1999
When Denise Zimmermann and Carol Swartz opened Bell Book & Candle in a Belair Road shopping center last June, they didn't predict the overwhelming response to their fragrant emporium of oils, texts and birthstones, where customers can experience past-life regression or have their Tarot cards read in a candle-lit chamber. "I thought we would be OK, but I had no idea we would be this welcome," says Zimmermann, a practicing witch with a broad sense of humor.Not only did nature-worshiping Neo-Pagans flock to the new store to peruse crystal balls, caldrons and books like "A Kitchen Witch's Cookbook," but about 50 people also signed up for Zimmermann's course on becoming a witch; professionals, truck drivers, teen mothers and women in their 70s among them.
NEWS
October 25, 1998
Religious freedom is important part of school 'hex' caseIn regard to the article "Student suspended for 'hex' " (Oct. 21), Southwestern High Alpha Academy Principal Earl L. Lee is obviously and admittedly ignorant about Jamie Schoonover's religion. But he goes further and says he finds it bizarre that one of his students admits to practicing witchcraft.This implies that he expects that anyone practicing witchcraft should keep it a secret, presumably because it is reprehensible. That shows a profound, if perhaps unconscious and unintended disrespect.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1998
Southwestern High School was thrown into turmoil yesterday when a ninth- grader accused her classmate, an admitted practicing witch who is the daughter of a witch, of putting a hex on her.In an incident seemingly more appropriate for a Halloween tale than for a public school, Jamie Schoonover, a 15-year-old freshman, was sent home yesterday with an official city schools discipline form, which cited the reason for the referral as "casting a spell on a...
NEWS
By Alan Singer and Alan Singer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 1996
"Death in the Andes," by Mario Vargas Llosa. Translated by Edith Grossman. Farrar, Strauss and Giroux. 276 pages. $24 The title of Mario Vargas Llosa's new novel, "Death in the Andes," invites us to entertain expectations of a particular, and so conventionally, dramatic death. Indeed, within 15 pages a beatific young couple arriving for spiritual communion with the Andean heights is brutally murdered by blank-faced children of the Shining Path. But this is only the first of myriad deaths.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 19, 2000
A slight, impish Lady Macbeth? Not so outlandish with Pippa Pearthree in the role. Nearly 20 years ago, when Pippa Pearthree was playing Ophelia in Joseph Papp's production of "Hamlet" at the New York Shakespeare Festival, the late great impresario told her: "The part for you is going to be Lady Macbeth." Now Center Stage is giving her a chance to see if Papp was right. Beginning Friday, Pearthree will be the one urging Macbeth (played by Ritchie Coster) to "screw your courage to the sticking place."
NEWS
By GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE and GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 27, 1998
TSHILAMBA, South Africa -- Violet Dangale, 42, was driven from her home 30 months ago by relatives and neighbors who accused her of being a witch growing rich from the work of zombies, as the "living dead" are known in that line of work.Now penniless and in fear for her life, she hides in this remote village of Northern Province in a tent given to her by the local police.Francina Sebatsana, 75, and Desia Mamafa, 55, suffered a worse fate in December. They were burned to death on pyres of wood in the village of Wyd-hoek, in the same province, after also being denounced as witches.
FEATURES
By Joanne P. Cavanaugh and Joanne P. Cavanaugh,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 29, 1997
In a room off the bustling corridors at St. Joseph Medical Center, a dozen doctors sit quietly eating shrimp-and-pasta salad as a videotape rolls: an introduction to acupuncture.The doctors are learning about the hospital's new Center for Health Enhancement, a mini-clinic in a nearby office park that offers acupuncture, yoga, massage therapy, biofeedback, aroma- and hypnotherapies and tai chi classes -- as well as a stress-soothing fish tank in the waiting room."We treat patients' problems from a holistic approach," Dr. Sukk Hahn, an M.D. and licensed acupuncturist, tells the hospital physicians.
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