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By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2006
My wisteria appears happy but does not produce blooms. Anything I can do? It might be too young or just too happy. Mature wisteria likes to be mistreated, so to speak. Wisteria produces flowers in order to reproduce by seed. When vegetation is flourishing, reproduction by seed doesn't get priority. Stop fertilizing, hold the watering, and follow an annual pruning schedule. If your plant still won't flower, try root pruning to see if you can shock it into flower. Insert a sharp spade every other spade width (like a dotted line)
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By Ellen Nibali and David Clement | November 3, 2007
Last year, I saw a black widow spider while cleaning up my yard. How do I avoid a bite? Bites are extremely rare. These shy, nonaggressive spiders bite only when humans threaten or grab them. Black widows weave a loose web and like undisturbed spots, such as dumps, log piles or outbuildings. The female's body is as shiny as patent leather and round as a ball. Both males and females have red markings. To protect yourself, wear gloves, especially when reaching where you can't see. Remove yard clutter and brush piles near the home.
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By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 25, 2001
Certain plants inspire ambivalence in the horticultural heart. Like Jekyll and Hyde or the two-faced Roman god Janus, they exhibit a split personality that both endears them to and exasperates the gardener. For example, I have Wisteria sinensis planted at the southwest corner of my front porch. It is 7 years old and has been blooming for three years. On the plus side, this is a lovely, graceful, vining plant. It is awesome in springtime as it leafs out and flowers with large, fragrant racemes of purple-blue blossoms.
FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | July 18, 2007
ME, Loana. You, Tumak." That was Raquel Welch's big line in One Million Years B.C. Her only line, in fact. As a screen incarnation of Woman in the Time of Dinosaurs -- human beings and dinosaurs never actually co-existed -- Miss Welch grunted and pantomimed her role. Her snarly cave girl catfight with Martine Beswick was especially evocative. Raquel, a proud Latina, was distressed to have to streak her hair blond as Loana, and certainly didn't think this movie was her ticket to stardom.
NEWS
April 11, 2000
Police Westminster: A resident of Pine Valley court told police Friday that someone took property from her vehicle. Loss is estimated at $278.58. Westminster: A resident of Wisteria Drive told police Friday that someone shattered the sunroof of her vehicle while it was parked on Woodward Road. Damage is estimated at $400. Westminster: A resident of Pennsylvania Avenue told police Friday that someone broke into his home and took property. Loss is estimated at $100.
NEWS
By Carol Stocker and Carol Stocker,Boston Globe | June 22, 2003
Horticulturist Mary Ann McGourty has a slide program on vines that begins with a New Yorker cartoon of a wife standing at the front door while her husband is outside being chased around the house by a runaway vine. She's shouting, "Look out! Here it comes again!" Some vines are invasive and should never be planted. Still, many people like the space-saving attributes and vertical accent that vines can bring to a garden. The trick is to choose the right one. You have to balance your desire for something quick-growing (who likes to wait?
NEWS
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,Special to the Sun | May 27, 2001
With some amazement, I found the clematis I planted last year not only still alive, but flourishing this spring. Two of them were especially a surprise because they had caught the dreaded clematis wilt and died back to the roots. I had sighed and promptly given up on them. Now, however, they are bright green and curling up sturdy tendrils about 24 inches tall. Which brings us to another consideration for clematis: What are suitable companions for them? Clematis are quintessential clinging vines and are born to run rampant over some other plant if ever a plant was, adding to the other's glory.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement | November 3, 2007
Last year, I saw a black widow spider while cleaning up my yard. How do I avoid a bite? Bites are extremely rare. These shy, nonaggressive spiders bite only when humans threaten or grab them. Black widows weave a loose web and like undisturbed spots, such as dumps, log piles or outbuildings. The female's body is as shiny as patent leather and round as a ball. Both males and females have red markings. To protect yourself, wear gloves, especially when reaching where you can't see. Remove yard clutter and brush piles near the home.
FEATURES
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 14, 1998
There are plants in my garden I have come to think of as the Lucrezia Borgias of the flower world.Beautiful. Alluring. Sweet scents beckoning. These are favorite plants whose flowers I yearly look forward to. Alas, I must regard them with care. They are poisonous.Does this surprise you? What kind of person would grow poisonous plants? The answer may surprise you.Most gardens are planned and thought of as places of graciousness and refuge, visual feasts and enticing scents, not to mention delicious flavors.
FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | July 18, 2007
ME, Loana. You, Tumak." That was Raquel Welch's big line in One Million Years B.C. Her only line, in fact. As a screen incarnation of Woman in the Time of Dinosaurs -- human beings and dinosaurs never actually co-existed -- Miss Welch grunted and pantomimed her role. Her snarly cave girl catfight with Martine Beswick was especially evocative. Raquel, a proud Latina, was distressed to have to streak her hair blond as Loana, and certainly didn't think this movie was her ticket to stardom.
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2006
My wisteria appears happy but does not produce blooms. Anything I can do? It might be too young or just too happy. Mature wisteria likes to be mistreated, so to speak. Wisteria produces flowers in order to reproduce by seed. When vegetation is flourishing, reproduction by seed doesn't get priority. Stop fertilizing, hold the watering, and follow an annual pruning schedule. If your plant still won't flower, try root pruning to see if you can shock it into flower. Insert a sharp spade every other spade width (like a dotted line)
FEATURES
By Roger Catlin and Roger Catlin,HARTFORD COURANT | January 28, 2005
LOS ANGELES - It's just around the corner from the Jaws pond on the Universal Studios tour. But the chatty tour guide never mentions Wisteria Lane, where a string of fanciful houses on a curvy street once known as Colonial Drive houses America's most popular new TV stars. The house lights twinkle the way they would on a normal, lively suburban street. The lawns and hedges are neatly trimmed, the flowers blooming and, if you touch them, fake. Except for the big Universal Studios parking garage looming on a hill, you might believe this street from Desperate Housewives really exists in a town called Fairview.
NEWS
By Carol Stocker and Carol Stocker,Boston Globe | June 22, 2003
Horticulturist Mary Ann McGourty has a slide program on vines that begins with a New Yorker cartoon of a wife standing at the front door while her husband is outside being chased around the house by a runaway vine. She's shouting, "Look out! Here it comes again!" Some vines are invasive and should never be planted. Still, many people like the space-saving attributes and vertical accent that vines can bring to a garden. The trick is to choose the right one. You have to balance your desire for something quick-growing (who likes to wait?
NEWS
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,Special to the Sun | May 27, 2001
With some amazement, I found the clematis I planted last year not only still alive, but flourishing this spring. Two of them were especially a surprise because they had caught the dreaded clematis wilt and died back to the roots. I had sighed and promptly given up on them. Now, however, they are bright green and curling up sturdy tendrils about 24 inches tall. Which brings us to another consideration for clematis: What are suitable companions for them? Clematis are quintessential clinging vines and are born to run rampant over some other plant if ever a plant was, adding to the other's glory.
NEWS
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 25, 2001
Certain plants inspire ambivalence in the horticultural heart. Like Jekyll and Hyde or the two-faced Roman god Janus, they exhibit a split personality that both endears them to and exasperates the gardener. For example, I have Wisteria sinensis planted at the southwest corner of my front porch. It is 7 years old and has been blooming for three years. On the plus side, this is a lovely, graceful, vining plant. It is awesome in springtime as it leafs out and flowers with large, fragrant racemes of purple-blue blossoms.
NEWS
April 11, 2000
Police Westminster: A resident of Pine Valley court told police Friday that someone took property from her vehicle. Loss is estimated at $278.58. Westminster: A resident of Wisteria Drive told police Friday that someone shattered the sunroof of her vehicle while it was parked on Woodward Road. Damage is estimated at $400. Westminster: A resident of Pennsylvania Avenue told police Friday that someone broke into his home and took property. Loss is estimated at $100.
FEATURES
By Roger Catlin and Roger Catlin,HARTFORD COURANT | January 28, 2005
LOS ANGELES - It's just around the corner from the Jaws pond on the Universal Studios tour. But the chatty tour guide never mentions Wisteria Lane, where a string of fanciful houses on a curvy street once known as Colonial Drive houses America's most popular new TV stars. The house lights twinkle the way they would on a normal, lively suburban street. The lawns and hedges are neatly trimmed, the flowers blooming and, if you touch them, fake. Except for the big Universal Studios parking garage looming on a hill, you might believe this street from Desperate Housewives really exists in a town called Fairview.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | April 19, 1992
Harriett Rogers is doing her part to repeat history.In 1936, the83-year-old woman's father, J. Alexis Shriver, gave a cutting of a wisteria vine at his family's Joppa estate to the owners of the famed Evergreen mansion in Baltimore.Tomorrow, Rogers will see a small portion cut from the same vine for replanting on the grounds at Evergreen, which currently has no wisteria.The vine at Evergreen, now owned by the Johns Hopkins University, was torn down along with a tea house in the estate's gardens about 20 years ago, said Christopher Weeks, Harford's historic preservation planner.
FEATURES
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 14, 1998
There are plants in my garden I have come to think of as the Lucrezia Borgias of the flower world.Beautiful. Alluring. Sweet scents beckoning. These are favorite plants whose flowers I yearly look forward to. Alas, I must regard them with care. They are poisonous.Does this surprise you? What kind of person would grow poisonous plants? The answer may surprise you.Most gardens are planned and thought of as places of graciousness and refuge, visual feasts and enticing scents, not to mention delicious flavors.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | April 19, 1992
Harriett Rogers is doing her part to repeat history.In 1936, the83-year-old woman's father, J. Alexis Shriver, gave a cutting of a wisteria vine at his family's Joppa estate to the owners of the famed Evergreen mansion in Baltimore.Tomorrow, Rogers will see a small portion cut from the same vine for replanting on the grounds at Evergreen, which currently has no wisteria.The vine at Evergreen, now owned by the Johns Hopkins University, was torn down along with a tea house in the estate's gardens about 20 years ago, said Christopher Weeks, Harford's historic preservation planner.
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