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NEWS
By Dave Rosenthal | June 13, 2012
Once in a while, a movie adaptation creates a character that is drawn so well it becomes an  archetype, a measuring stick for all other similar characters. Think John Wayne, the western tough in "True Grit," which was adapted from the Charles Portis novel. Or Ray Liotta, the New York hood in "Goodfellas," adapted from the book "Wiseguy. " News comes today of the death of Henry Hill, the real-life gangster-turned-informant who was the lifeblood of "Wiseguy" and Martin Scorsese's "Goodfellas.
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NEWS
By Dave Rosenthal | June 13, 2012
Once in a while, a movie adaptation creates a character that is drawn so well it becomes an  archetype, a measuring stick for all other similar characters. Think John Wayne, the western tough in "True Grit," which was adapted from the Charles Portis novel. Or Ray Liotta, the New York hood in "Goodfellas," adapted from the book "Wiseguy. " News comes today of the death of Henry Hill, the real-life gangster-turned-informant who was the lifeblood of "Wiseguy" and Martin Scorsese's "Goodfellas.
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NEWS
June 13, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Ray Sharkey, the hard-living actor wh starred as a crime boss in the TV series "Wiseguy," died of AIDS complications, his manager said yesterday. He was 40.Mr. Sharkey died Friday in a Brooklyn, N.Y., hospital, said Herb Nanas. He had been in Southern California until a week ago when he returned home to New York."Doctors said he was supposed to pass away six to eight months ago. He put up the most extraordinary battle," Mr. Nanas said.Mr. Sharkey battled drug abuse problems through much of his career.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 14, 2004
There is something wrong with a society that can't allow itself to just enjoy the simple pleasures of a Christmas TV special without analyzing the experience to death. Have we become so media-critical and deconstructionist that there's no place for a little Rudolph joy in our post-postmodern hearts? That's what I was thinking as I sat down with Bravo's The Christmas Special Christmas Special, a one-hour look at the history of Christmas television shows. The special, hosted by Carson Kressley (Queer Eye for the Straight Guy)
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | November 8, 1990
"Wiseguy" returns to the CBS lineup Saturday night with a two-hour episode loaded with cliches in its script, improbabilities in its plot, and a basic lack of imagination in its direction.By the way, it's also pretty good.This is the new, different "Wiseguy" that came about when original star Ken Wahl either asked to jump ship or was forced to dTC walk the plank, depending on whose story you believe.The original plan called for Wahl's Vinnie Terranova character to be around for a few episodes to make the transition to a new federal undercover agent, but the recriminations put the kibosh on that.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | November 9, 1990
Are you ready for yet another lawyer as the new prime-time hero for the '90s?There's another one arriving tomorrow night at 9 on WBAL-TV (Channel 11) with the return of "Wiseguy." And it's a happy homecoming for viewers.Steven Bauer replaces Ken Wahl as star of the revamped show. Wahl was fired as star of the show after he got in a dogfight with executive producer Stephen J. Cannell and CBS last year.Bauer plays Michael Santana, a former U.S. Attorney who was disbarred sometime during the 1980s for a violation of ethics.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | September 13, 1990
Four movie openings tomorrow officially begin the fall film season. Coming weeks will bring many more. We hope most will find their audiences. Here are some movies showing particular promise:* "Postcards From the Edge" is about a young woman who spends time in a drug rehabilitation center. Carrie Fisher wrote the script from her own novel, and Mike Nichols directed this comedy drama. Meryl Streep plays the daughter, Shirley MacLaine is the mother, and Hollywood is their home. "Postcards From the Edge" opens tomorrow.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1999
If you're desperately looking for that last-minute gift, and the intended recipient is a TV nut of the first order, your quest may be over.How about a big black box that not only makes it all-but-impossible for viewers to miss their favorite shows, but even tells them what those favorite shows should be?That's the premise behind the Personal Television Receiver (PTV) from Philips Electronics and TiVo. Roughly the size of a VCR, complete with a glass eye in front that gives it a sort of Big-Brotherish look, the PTV uses information downloaded from the telephone to tell you everything that's on TV at any given time, provide plot synopses and suggest related programming you might enjoy.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | November 23, 1990
Stephen Cannell turns out so many series that you can't blame him for repeating himself now and again, but if he's going to rip off his past, why not give us a reprise of "The Rockford Files" or "Tenspeed and Brown Shoe" instead of another "A-Team."That's what you get Saturday night on CBS when "Broken Badges" premieres with a two-hour pilot that will be on Channel 11 (WBAL) at 8 o'clock. It's a bunch of wild and crazy types who careen slightly out of control as they right wrongs and dispense justice, mixing in some mirth with the mayhem.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 31, 1994
A sixtysomething-twentysomething, grandfather-grandson crime fighting team?Holy demographics, Batman!"Traps," which stars George C. Scott and MTV's Dan Cortese, looks like it was created with considerable calculation, one eye firmly on audience demographics.But don't let that keep you from checking it out.While the combination of Cortese and Scott doesn't always click in tonight's premiere on CBS, there are more than enough moments to make this series too good to be dismissed out of hand.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1999
If you're desperately looking for that last-minute gift, and the intended recipient is a TV nut of the first order, your quest may be over.How about a big black box that not only makes it all-but-impossible for viewers to miss their favorite shows, but even tells them what those favorite shows should be?That's the premise behind the Personal Television Receiver (PTV) from Philips Electronics and TiVo. Roughly the size of a VCR, complete with a glass eye in front that gives it a sort of Big-Brotherish look, the PTV uses information downloaded from the telephone to tell you everything that's on TV at any given time, provide plot synopses and suggest related programming you might enjoy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By New York Daily News | February 21, 1999
NEW YORK -- Mob movie fan David Brinker does not sleep with the fishes. But he does spend a lot of time thinking in the bathtub, where he came up with the idea for "Mob Hits," a compilation CD of so-called "mob music."Featuring songs by the likes of Dean Martin, Al Martino and Louis Prima, the two-CD set, pitched on late-night cable TV by singer Jerry Vale, is helping put Brinker, 25, through Fordham Law SchoolHe got the idea to produce the album after a long night of studying. "[Most people]
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 3, 1998
They say it's wrong to judge a book by its cover, but what about judging a pop star by his hits?If all you know about Beck is what you hear on the radio, odds are you think of him as a wry, funky guy. Thanks to such hits as "Loser," "Where It's At" and "New Pollution," he seems the perfect post-modern pop star, grounding his smash-and-grab arrangements in grooves borrowed from hip-hop and funk.Seen through those songs, he seems the weisenheimer alterna-rock cousin of the Beastie Boys. But if that's the sort of sound you expect from "Mutations" (DGC 25309, arriving in stores today)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1997
The mob. The FBI. A guy working for the feds is embraced by gangsters. Wiseguys cracking people's heads. Wiretaps. A wife who sees her husband maybe a few dozen times a year. Money, lots of it.With all that, how can you lose?Not to mention the mobster is a sad-sack, years-beyond-his-prime grunt played with doe-eyed pathos by Al Pacino. And the barely-under-control FBI agent, who's finding life as a mobster infinitely more interesting than life as a husband, father and lawman, is the ever-unpredictable Johnny Depp.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 31, 1994
A sixtysomething-twentysomething, grandfather-grandson crime fighting team?Holy demographics, Batman!"Traps," which stars George C. Scott and MTV's Dan Cortese, looks like it was created with considerable calculation, one eye firmly on audience demographics.But don't let that keep you from checking it out.While the combination of Cortese and Scott doesn't always click in tonight's premiere on CBS, there are more than enough moments to make this series too good to be dismissed out of hand.
NEWS
By Virginia I. Postrel | July 9, 1993
WHEN the Chicago Bulls won their third world championship, riots broke out in Chicago, killing three people. When the Montreal Canadiens took the Stanley Cup, the ensuing riots injured 168 and did $10 million in damage. The Dallas Cowboys' Super Bowl victory produced similar results.You do not have to be a social scientist to see the relation. Sports championships cause violence.But calling for an end to the Super Bowl or the NBA championship games will not win politicians the applause of journalists and social critics.
NEWS
By Virginia I. Postrel | July 9, 1993
WHEN the Chicago Bulls won their third world championship, riots broke out in Chicago, killing three people. When the Montreal Canadiens took the Stanley Cup, the ensuing riots injured 168 and did $10 million in damage. The Dallas Cowboys' Super Bowl victory produced similar results.You do not have to be a social scientist to see the relation. Sports championships cause violence.But calling for an end to the Super Bowl or the NBA championship games will not win politicians the applause of journalists and social critics.
NEWS
April 14, 1992
The Teflon finally wore off. John Gotti, the thug of thugs, the murderer of murderers, the corrupter of the corrupted, has finally got his comeuppance. Dubbed the "Teflon Don" because he eluded justice three times in the past six years, Gotti has been found guilty of enough crimes to keep him in prison for the rest of his life.Like many organisms that flash their most brilliant colors as they are dying, the flamboyant Gotti was a spectacular example of a vanishing species. Armed with stronger legal weapons, federal prosecutors have been beheading organized crime gangs around the country for the past decade.
NEWS
June 13, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Ray Sharkey, the hard-living actor wh starred as a crime boss in the TV series "Wiseguy," died of AIDS complications, his manager said yesterday. He was 40.Mr. Sharkey died Friday in a Brooklyn, N.Y., hospital, said Herb Nanas. He had been in Southern California until a week ago when he returned home to New York."Doctors said he was supposed to pass away six to eight months ago. He put up the most extraordinary battle," Mr. Nanas said.Mr. Sharkey battled drug abuse problems through much of his career.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | December 21, 1992
Simon Says:How did weathermen describe hail before the invention of golf balls?*Now Ask Me If I Care Dept.: George Bush actually once met Babe Ruth.*Does anyone still use iodine?*True Confessions: I have had impure thoughts about CNN's Christiane Amanpour.*If you haven't gotten me a holiday gift yet, my Maserati size is a medium.*People who burn artificial logs are the saddest people I know.*If Letterman really does switch to CBS at 11:30 p.m., it means we're going to have to tape "Nightline."
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