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NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | May 1, 1992
WASHINGTON -- That was not exactly an avalanche of endorsements that came down on Gov. Bill Clinton when he visited Capitol Hill the day after his clear-cut victory in the Pennsylvania presidential primary. By one count, 31 House and Senate members climbed aboard the Clinton bandwagon. That brings the total of previously unpledged congressional "superdelegates" who had committed to him to 123, out of 275 getting a free ride to the Democratic National Convention.The whole idea of the superdelegates is that as ranking party officials and elected officeholders, they are supposed to function as party wise men and women poised to bring political pragmatism to the choice of a nominee, especially if the voters in primaries are deemed to have lacked it.The designation was inspired by the 1976 nomination of Jimmy Carter through the primary election process, which at the time and in retrospect many Democratic regulars considered disastrous, because Carter was such an unknown quantity, especially to the party wise men and women.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | December 25, 2007
Mark Kidger of the European Space Agency confesses to a certain obsession at this time of year -- one that has nothing to do with the big bang or dark energy. "It's probably the oldest mystery in astronomy," the British scientist said. Kidger is speaking of the "Star of Bethlehem," the heavenly sign in the Gospel of St. Matthew that guided the wise men in their search for the baby Jesus. Although it is no longer a staple of planetarium shows, the star and its story remain as fascinating for astronomers and historians on this Christmas Day as they have for almost two millenniums.
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NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | December 18, 1991
Three shrouded figures move across the night sky of the U.S. Naval Academy planetarium, where a Christmas show takes viewers back to Persia in the year 3 B.C.These robed men, the famed Magi of the Christmas story, were most likely Zoroastrian priests, astrologers who thought the heavenly bodies influenced the lives of human beings, historians believe.Christians everywhere sing hymns about the Wise Men and their star, immortalized in Renaissance art as a famous comet. But determiningwhat bright light the Magi really followed has puzzled astronomers for centuries.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | December 25, 2006
PITTSBURGH-- --The closer the Ravens get to home-field advantage throughout the AFC playoffs, the more thoroughly they're beating teams away from home. Which raises the legitimate question: What difference, really, does home field make? "We don't care where we play," Bart Scott said yesterday, as seriously as he has ever sounded (or, at least, as serious as he can be). "As long as I've got my teammates with me and my coaching staff, I could care less. We can play in the Orange Bowl, USC, at a high school, in Texas ... " Not that they don't crave the prospect of having the proverbial road to the Super Bowl go through M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
By Barbara M. Simon | December 24, 1991
On the other side of dawn,in the empty shell of day,we look back, acrossthe boundary of another yeardying. Words never spoken.Commitments never made.Prayers left unsaid.We pull resolve around usthe way the wise men fixedtheir gaze upon a star,journeyed to a landso foreign they stood speechlessbefore an infant whose lightburned them all into a faithbeyond language.How needy we are, todayof a wisdom bound in silence,of belief beyond barriersto secure usas the wise men shelteredunder a sky shot with silver,blanketed by a baby's peaceful smile.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Karin Remesch | December 12, 1996
'Amahl and the Night Visitors'The whole family can enjoy an entertaining production at the )) Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the Christmas story "Amahl and the Night Visitors."The story tells of a poor, young boy, Amahl, and his widowed mother who are visited by the Three Wise Men, bearing gifts and asking to be taken in for the night as they make their way to Bethlehem. Lessons are learned as Amahl and his motherovercome their bitterness and envy of the Wise Men's wealth and gifts they wish to bestow not on them, but on someone else.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 3, 2003
Don't put away those manger scenes yet. The 12 days of Christmas, which began Dec. 25, don't officially conclude until the Feast of the Three Kings on Jan. 6, the traditional date for the wise men, or Magi, to arrive. Several Howard County Christian churches have traditional, and nontraditional, Epiphany customs. At the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Ellicott City, the wise men arrived a little early. The weekend before Christmas, the church held a pageant. Members of the parish took turns playing the roles of prophets, shepherds and the three wise men. James Gartside of Jessup, who was among the Magi, said the wise men were familiar figures in Old Testament and other prophecies about a coming Messiah and connected those with astrological events.
NEWS
By Joe Murray | January 12, 1991
THE FOG COMES in at night, shrouding this city of 4 million souls. The dogs of Baghdad, in their confusion and fear, come awake in the fog and howl into the night.It is after midnight, I am awake and can't go back to sleep. I phone a reporter whom I know here, who I know will be awake also.I ask her to tell me what news she's heard in the last few hours. After she tells me, I don't go back to sleep. I go to look for a church.In this city of 4 million souls, some 400,000 of them are Christian.
NEWS
December 25, 1994
It is no accident that Christmas quickly follows the winter solstice. Four days ago, the sun stopped in its southward journey and turned around. However much hardship lies ahead (far less, we trust, than last winter), be assured that Spring, warmth and rebirth are already on the way.The silent night of waiting, then the joyful birth. Wrap it all in faith and you have the Christmas message. In bleak mid-winter, carefully nourished hope yields an epiphany and the world has cause to sing.Christmas, a Christian feast day, has worked its way into the secular culture not just because it provides an irresistible commercial opportunity but also because it wraps grand themes of the human drama in such an appealing story.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2000
BETHLEHEM - Frank and Marjorie McGee didn't need a bright star in the east to point the way last week from their Dundalk home to this rural crossroads with the Biblical name. This is one trip they haven't missed in more than 10 years. Like hundreds of other people who come to this unincorporated Caroline County town this time of year, Frank - a retired steelworker and avid collector of postmarks from throughout the country - couldn't dream up a better way to celebrate the season. Every December since 1938, tourists, travelers and plenty of locals from surrounding counties have jammed the one-room post office about eight miles from Easton to partake in a ritual many say has become as much a part of their holiday as tree-trimming or baking cookies: getting the Bethlehem postmark on their Christmas cards.
NEWS
December 24, 2006
As the hours dwindle down to a precious few for those who haven't finished their Christmas shopping, we are reminded that there's a perfectly acceptable - even trendy! - way to spread holiday cheer without actually buying anything. It's called "regifting" (if you've never quite gotten over the linguistic travesty of using "gift" as a verb, "regifting" will only compound your dismay). It means, of course, taking a present that someone has given to you, generally one you are not particularly fond of, and giving it to someone else.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | November 28, 2006
When Harry Hughes was elected governor in 1978, his transition team consisted of himself and a few trusted advisers. Today, though, Hughes is co-chairing a 47-member transition team helping Peter Franchot ease into the Maryland comptroller's office, as well as serving on the 42-member transition team of Gov.-elect Martin O'Malley. He somehow escaped being named to the third transition team that is in business these days - City Council President Sheila Dixon's 47-member group, marshaling her move into O'Malley's soon-to-be vacated mayor's office.
NEWS
By Mark Silva and Mark Silva,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 22, 2006
HONOLULU -- The young airman who escorted reporters from Hickam Air Force Base said his wife, in particular, was excited to see President Bush touch down with Air Force One. "She's from Texas," he explained. "It's like seeing a rock star." The president isn't much of a rock star in the States these days, with his public approval ratings near an all-time low, his party preparing to relinquish control of Congress in January and his administration facing fateful questions about the course of the war in Iraq.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | October 20, 2006
Janet Gilbert At the dress rehearsal for Sunday's Annual Concert of the Heart of Maryland Chorus, 40 men ranging in age from 14 to 79 suddenly break into what can best be described as a "vocal raspberry." The men's lips are pursed forward comically, vibrating a tone in perfect four-part harmony. "That's bubbling," explains Riley Nichols, 14, a tenor from Hammond High School who will be performing in the show with his quartet, Chopper 4. Kevin King, music director of the barbershop choral group since 1988, elaborates on the technique.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 1, 2005
If the three wise men had been women, they would have asked directions, helped with the delivery, made a casserole ... and there would be peace on earth. This is a sample of the wisdom imparted in Sister's Christmas Catechism: The Mystery of the Magi's Gold at the Theatre Project. Written by Maripat Donovan, Jane Morris and the show's director, Marc Silva, the one-woman show is a sequel to Donovan's Late Nite Catechism, which played a long run in Towson five seasons ago. Indeed, the Catechism shows - there's also a Late Nite Catechism 2 - have become so popular, they've practically spawned their own order of gently wise-cracking actress-nuns.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2005
They came bearing gifts and fake beards. But these men of Christmas had at least one advantage over Santa Claus: They spoke Spanish. So the children yelled for them - "Tres reyes!" - asking the three kings to come out. But it was not yet time, and tradition, especially in this corner of Baltimore, was something to be heeded. Yesterday, after many families in town had dispensed with their stockings, pine trees, lights and wrapping paper, children from the Latino community near Fells Point gathered for Three Kings Day. Also known as Epiphany, Dia de los Reyes has been celebrated for hundreds of years throughout Spain and Latin America.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 1, 2005
If the three wise men had been women, they would have asked directions, helped with the delivery, made a casserole ... and there would be peace on earth. This is a sample of the wisdom imparted in Sister's Christmas Catechism: The Mystery of the Magi's Gold at the Theatre Project. Written by Maripat Donovan, Jane Morris and the show's director, Marc Silva, the one-woman show is a sequel to Donovan's Late Nite Catechism, which played a long run in Towson five seasons ago. Indeed, the Catechism shows - there's also a Late Nite Catechism 2 - have become so popular, they've practically spawned their own order of gently wise-cracking actress-nuns.
NEWS
December 24, 2006
As the hours dwindle down to a precious few for those who haven't finished their Christmas shopping, we are reminded that there's a perfectly acceptable - even trendy! - way to spread holiday cheer without actually buying anything. It's called "regifting" (if you've never quite gotten over the linguistic travesty of using "gift" as a verb, "regifting" will only compound your dismay). It means, of course, taking a present that someone has given to you, generally one you are not particularly fond of, and giving it to someone else.
NEWS
December 25, 2003
State standards for appliances hurt consumers The Sun's article "Ehrlich vetoes to face scrutiny" (Dec. 18) incorrectly states that only one group opposed the energy efficiency bill. The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) and our member companies actively opposed this bill from the day it was introduced. We testified against the bill along with four other industry associations when it was considered by each chamber of the Maryland legislature. We still strongly oppose this bill and urge the legislature not to override the governor's veto.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 3, 2003
Don't put away those manger scenes yet. The 12 days of Christmas, which began Dec. 25, don't officially conclude until the Feast of the Three Kings on Jan. 6, the traditional date for the wise men, or Magi, to arrive. Several Howard County Christian churches have traditional, and nontraditional, Epiphany customs. At the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Ellicott City, the wise men arrived a little early. The weekend before Christmas, the church held a pageant. Members of the parish took turns playing the roles of prophets, shepherds and the three wise men. James Gartside of Jessup, who was among the Magi, said the wise men were familiar figures in Old Testament and other prophecies about a coming Messiah and connected those with astrological events.
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