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NEWS
By Arthur J. Magida | September 15, 2002
NEW YORK -- The whirlwind hit New York again Sept. 11, just as it did a year ago. On Wednesday, the winds reached 60 miles an hour. Trees fell. Wires collapsed. Construction supplies were blown from rooftops. Wednesday's winds came down from the skies, the heavens. A year ago Sept. 11, they came from the hell that Lower Manhattan turned into that day. The turbulence of heat and vacuum and momentum and combustion from the World Trade Center generated a micro-climate of dust from incinerated bodies and metal and paper and plastic and dreams -- all whipped about by winds that started in the morning and howled all night and that, in some minds, have not stopped to this day. Long ago, a voice appeared from another whirlwind, one in which God asked Job, "Who is this who darkens counsel by words without knowledge?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2014
A lot can happen in the first three years of a restaurant's life. Things can go haywire. Investors panic, managers quit and staff moves on. But sometimes, not often enough, wisdom prevails. The restaurant considers what works, what doesn't. It reacts, but doesn't overreact, to diners' responses, and it changes things, thoughtfully, gradually, confidently. If you believe in the capacity for change, head down to Wit & Wisdom, the principal restaurant at the Four Seasons Baltimore Hotel.
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NEWS
By ISAAC REHERT | June 23, 1995
Go to the ant, thou sluggard; consider her ways and be wise.--Proverbs 6:6The ant's industry is -- please pardon the pun -- proverbial. In the fable, isn't the ant, as the foil of the sun-giddy grasshopper, the symbol of foresight and prudence?These warm sunny days are the season for ants. In the garden I notice them crawling, always in a hurry, among ant-sized specks of dirt; and on sidewalks, as I stroll with my dog, I see their mounds -- brown creepy doughnuts -- in the cracks between the concrete slabs.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 7, 2014
Given the numerous studies revealing how American education lags behind instruction in other countries in disciplines once thought to be essential, it should come as no surprise that on the 70th anniversary of D-Day, a lot of people are clueless about central elements of the Allied invasion of the European continent on June 6, 1944. The American Council of Trustees and Alumni  (ACTA) has released the results of a survey, which finds only slightly more than half (54 percent)
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | September 20, 2006
ARLINGTON, Va. -- And now for the definition-impaired, the meaning of the word naive: "deficient in worldly wisdom or informed judgment." There was plenty of that on display last week in Pittsburgh and Washington. At the annual National Conference of Editorial Writers Convention in Pittsburgh, Edward G. Rendell, Pennsylvania governor and former general chairman of the Democratic National Committee, addressed a group of pundits on the subject, "Will the Real Democratic Party Please Stand Up?"
FEATURES
By Barbara Turk, M.S | September 24, 1991
There's something you're yearning to do: Marry the person you love, change careers, follow a new lifestyle. But, whatever it is, you haven't done it. It's as though your heart says "go," but your head says "stop." It's very confusing.Of course it is. Sounds as though there's a war going on between your heart and your head. Using the marriage example given:* Your head lectures "This may not be the right person for you." (Maybe he/she is immature or irresponsible . . .)* Your head responds "Yes, but I love him. And, anyway, it may turn out OK even so. Love, conquers all, you know!"
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | August 10, 2007
Ravens cornerback Chris McAlister says he doesn't have much to say anymore. He isn't jumping in front of cameras. He's not bashing reporters. He hasn't missed a practice or been late for a meeting. The new McAlister is the same as the old McAlister, but only on the field. Ravens training camp Through Aug. 18, McDaniel College, Westminster Today: 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.; 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Online: baltimoresun.com/ravenscentral
NEWS
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | July 9, 2006
I'm having a crisis of wisdom. Older parents warned me this would happen, but I thought they were just being older parents bereft of wisdom. Now, I'm the older parent -- and don't think I don't notice you young parents on my street with the strollers and your amazing, adorable kids soaking up your smarts. Take that inside, would you? In my day, you should have seen me dispense wisdom. Make your head spin. And yes, I have brought samples with me today. Listen to these gems from many years ago in the wise Hiaasen household.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 9, 2000
Saul Bellow, a towering figure of American literature, has, at 84, produced a new novel. It is vibrant with life, joy, love -- and abrim with wisdom. If proof were needed that great craft need not ebb with age, and that a brilliant mind and courageous heart need never cease growing, here it is: "Ravelstein" (Penguin Putnam Inc., 233 pages, $24.95). The book is concise and the story quite simple. It centers on Abe Ravelstein, a distinguished, controversial scholar of political philosophy.
NEWS
April 4, 1997
POTTSTOWN, Pa. -- If you listen to Walter Listhuis, a retired public school teacher drinking his "get-my-eyes-open" afternoon coffee, the conventional wisdom in Washington is once again right about the campaign fund-raising issue."
SPORTS
Mike Preston | May 23, 2014
Denver coach Bill Tierney doesn't think he is a genius, but he has one of the greatest defensive minds in the history of college lacrosse. If there are two head coaches who could come up with a scheme to upset No. 1 seed Duke, they are Johns Hopkins' Dave Pietramala or Tierney. Pietramala had his turn last week, and Duke routed the Blue Jays, 19-11. Tierney gets his turn Saturday in the men's Division I lacrosse semifinals at M&T Bank Stadium. "Coach T had a shot at them earlier in the year and I think they lost, 14-10," said Loyola assistant coach Dave Metzbower, who worked as an assistant for 20 years under Tierney at Princeton.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | April 8, 2014
I'm not sure whether the weather makes me want to drink in celebration of the new season or in escape from the old. Either way: It. Is. Spring, y'all. Ah, it's the return of outdoor seating, of live music, a nice breeze off the water, and light, airy sips of cooling cocktails. The only problem is that everyone's got the same plan. Take this past weekend, for example: People were practically falling out of the windows or off bar balconies soaking in every ounce of summer sunshine and beverages that they could.
NEWS
By Ted Kruse | November 17, 2013
Today, I became old. The Federal government told me so. An official letter from the Social Security Administration announced my eligibility for Medicare. The envelope also contained a red, white and blue Medicare card. The patriotic color theme continued in a 32-page booklet explaining Medicare in age-appropriate 14-point type. The official pronouncement of being declared old is a reminder that life is full of rites of passage: starting school, getting a driver's license, graduating from high school and getting married.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | September 5, 2013
Congress will reconvene shortly. That means more battles over taxes and spending, regulations and safety nets, and how to get the economy out of first gear. Which means more gridlock and continual showdowns over budget resolutions and the debt ceiling. But before the hostilities start again and we all get lost in political strategies and petty tactics, it's useful to consider what's really at stake for our economy and democracy. For much of the past century, the basic bargain at the heart of America was that employers paid their workers enough to buy what American employers were selling.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
Zack Mills has been named the new executive chef at Wit & Wisdom, A Tavern by Michael Mina, the everyday restaurant at the Four Seasons Baltimore Hotel. His first day in the position was Monday. Mills, a native of Davidsonville, is the third executive chef for Wit & Wisdom , which is operated by the San Francisco-based Mina Group. The opening chef, Benjamin Lambert, was replaced in June 2012 by Clayton Miller, who is leaving Mina for a job in Florida. "I'm extremely excited about the opportunity," said Mills, who has been with the Mina Group for five years and helped to launch the openings of Wit & Wisdom and Pabu, the Japanese restaurant at the Four Seasons Baltimore.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2013
The mother of a Howard County teenager who died after dental surgery wants to see all pediatric dental procedures that use general anesthesia take place in hospitals someday. But for now, Cathy Garger hopes to shed light on dangers surrounding routine dental visits that she believes led to the death of her daughter, 17-year-old Jennifer Michelle "Jenny" Olenick, and other pediatric patients. Olenick, a junior at Marriotts Ridge High School, died in April 2011, 10 days after losing oxygen during a wisdom tooth extraction procedure at an oral surgeon's Columbia office.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | July 29, 2007
While doing chores with my son, I had occasion to bring up an old maxim. "You should never put anything smaller than your elbow into your ear," I declared. "What?" he said. "This whole project just reminds me that you should never put anything smaller than your elbow into your ear," I repeated. "But what's that supposed to mean?" he said. Aha! Today's teenagers know so much - always calling us over to the computer to show us the latest YouTube video, read a topical joke, view the hottest commercial or pass on breaking news.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2000
He was 41 at the time, and by all accounts, a success. He was married, working on a second college degree, looking to the future. But something was missing. He felt his anxieties mounting and wanted to talk. He didn't want to go back to a psychologist because, in the past, he felt they had only tried to fit him into one or another preconceived pathology. That's when the man, a New Yorker who asks that his name not be used because of the personal nature of his problems, turned to a philosopher.
NEWS
By Patricia Schultheis | May 30, 2013
Back in the late 1950s, when I was in the seventh grade, I brought a deadly weapon to school. One morning, into the pocket of my Catholic school uniform, I slipped a knife. I then said good-bye to my mother and got on the bus for St. Ambrose School in Bridgeport, Conn. Although I knew that bringing the knife to school probably was testing the limits of acceptable behavior, I also knew that owning the knife was perfectly fine. Otherwise, my father would not have given it to me. A few months earlier, the knife had been my Christmas present from him. I remember folding back layers of tissue from an oddly shaped gift that clearly wasn't a pair of mittens or a book, until suddenly, the last layer of tissue gone, there it was - a knife!
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
The new outdoor bar and dining space at Wit & Wisdom has a name: Wit on the Water. The bar seats 12 with additional waterside seating for 85. Along with its new dining space, Wit & Wisdom , the main restaurant at the Four Seasons Baltimore Hotel , is introducing new lunch, dinner and tavern menus. New lunch options include a chilled salmon salad,  New England lobster roll, tamarind-glazed swordfish and a Tuscarora spring vegetable tagliatelle. New dinner listings include "regional tavern classics" like wood-oven roasted Virginia chicken served with black truffle macaroni and cheese and an updated selection of wood-grilled meats and seafood dishes.
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