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By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2004
Shareholders of Owings Mills-based Aether Systems Inc. voted to divest the company's last technology component in a special meeting yesterday, officially sending the former rising star of wireless communication on to its new venture in mortgage-backed securities. "The company has been so beaten up," said George M. Ward, a retiree who owns 1,000 shares of Aether stock and attended the meeting in Baltimore. "Two years ago we were hopeful it would come back, but it looks like that's not going to be the case."
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BUSINESS
By Jon Van and Wailin Wong and Jon Van and Wailin Wong,Chicago Tribune | January 22, 2008
A prime piece of invisible real estate is going up for auction this week, and the winners of the $10 billion virtual land grab have the potential to shake up wireless communications in the United States. The property in question is a sizable swath of the country's radio spectrum that television broadcasters are returning to the government as they convert from analog to digital systems. The frequencies, known as the 700 megahertz spectrum, are ideal for wireless communications, and 214 bidders will vie for the rare opportunity to nab a piece of the coveted spectrum.
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BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2000
Aether Systems Inc., the Owings Mills developer of wireless communications services, said yesterday that it acquired one of Europe's largest providers of financial data to "smart phone," pagers and other wireless devices for $85 million. The cash deal for IFX Group PLC gains Aether a further foothold in the growing market for wireless information services in Europe, said Brian Keane, vice president for Aether. The acquisition was driven in part by Aether's interest in technology that IFX is developing to improve data delivery over a new generation of high-speed digital networks being rolled out across Western Europe, said Keane.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2005
TO HIS COLLEAGUES within Verizon Wireless, associate engineer Gregory Booze is sometimes referred to as Test Man because of the work he does for the cellular-telephone business of the nation's largest telephone company. But you might want to call him the Can-You-Hear-Me-Now? guy. Like the Verizon Wireless technician in a widely broadcast commercial, Booze, 53, is a member of the Verizon Wireless test team, a nationwide group of about 50 men and women who drive hundreds of miles and make thousands of cellular-telephone calls each working day to test the company's wireless network.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christopher Boyd and Christopher Boyd,ORLANDO SENTINEL | May 20, 2004
ORLANDO, Fla. - Thousands of drivers zipping along Interstate 4 between Lee Road and Maitland Boulevard every day are oblivious as they pass through a demonstration zone for a telecommunications technology on the cutting edge. Small transceivers mounted on lampposts and bolted to rooftops along the route form the backbone of an electronic "mesh" - a high-speed, wireless communications web that allows properly equipped travelers to surf the Internet and place phone calls. The roadside web is a showcase for MeshNetworks Inc.'s signature technology.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2005
TO HIS COLLEAGUES within Verizon Wireless, associate engineer Gregory Booze is sometimes referred to as Test Man because of the work he does for the cellular-telephone business of the nation's largest telephone company. But you might want to call him the Can-You-Hear-Me-Now? guy. Like the Verizon Wireless technician in a widely broadcast commercial, Booze, 53, is a member of the Verizon Wireless test team, a nationwide group of about 50 men and women who drive hundreds of miles and make thousands of cellular-telephone calls each working day to test the company's wireless network.
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF REPORTER | July 15, 2000
Tessco Technologies Inc., the Hunt Valley telecommunications equipment maker, said yesterday that first-quarter revenue surged 44 percent, pushing up net income by a third, partly because of growing demand for products for the wireless communications industry Net income was $1.6 million, or 34 cents per diluted share, compared with $1.2 million, or 26 cents per diluted share, in the year-ago period. Tessco said revenue for the quarter, which ended June 25, was $62.5 million, a record, compared with $43.5 million for the same quarter a year ago. Tessco's quarterly report, commented William Benton, an analyst at William Blair & Co., reflected "nice growth across the board.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 20, 1996
In a showdown with the Justice Department, the wireless communications industry voted yesterday to reject government-backed technology that would make it possible for law enforcement agencies to keep closer tabs on cellular telephone users.The Justice Department contends that the government has the right to use powerful new surveillance technology under a 1994 law to bring law-enforcement techniques into the modern era.Among other abilities, the Justice Department wants to be able for the first time to determine the location of a cellular phone caller within a half-second and almost instantly monitor the status of cellular-phone voice mail, conference calls and other wireless communications features.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 29, 1995
In a big victory for local telephone businesses, a federal judge ruled yesterday that the seven regional Bell companies could offer long-distance cellular and other wireless service.Declaring that "effective, large-scale competition" would lead torapid progress in wireless communications, Judge Harold H. Greene opened the long-distance market to local companies -- on the condition that they can demonstrate measurable competition in their own markets.As the overseer of the 1984 antitrust decree that broke up the Bell System, Judge Greene rules on the Bell companies' efforts to expand beyond their core markets.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1994
Japan trade surplus rises 4.8%Japan's giant trade surplus rose 4.8 percent, to $14.45 billion, in July from $13.78 billion a year earlier, the Finance Ministry announced yesterday.A ministry official told reporters that the trade surplus was still on a falling trend, but added that future movements were uncertain because of possible changes in crude-oil prices and the yen/dollar rate.The ministry, which announced the trade figures yesterday, said the surplus in Japan's current account, its broadest measure of trade in goods and services, rose 0.9 percent to $11.74 billion in July.
NEWS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2005
Verizon Communications Inc. said yesterday that it will buy MCI Inc. for roughly $6.7 billion, mating the nation's largest local telephone company and No. 2 long-distance provider in a deal demonstrating the depth of change in what was once a staid, regulated industry. Some consumer advocates said the deal could lead to higher prices and fewer competitive options for basic phone services as the old "Ma Bell" regional phone companies reassemble their monopolistic parts. Others in the industry said it will let the top companies offer convenient multiservice packages that buyers of technology services have been demanding for a decade.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2004
Shareholders of Owings Mills-based Aether Systems Inc. voted to divest the company's last technology component in a special meeting yesterday, officially sending the former rising star of wireless communication on to its new venture in mortgage-backed securities. "The company has been so beaten up," said George M. Ward, a retiree who owns 1,000 shares of Aether stock and attended the meeting in Baltimore. "Two years ago we were hopeful it would come back, but it looks like that's not going to be the case."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christopher Boyd and Christopher Boyd,ORLANDO SENTINEL | May 20, 2004
ORLANDO, Fla. - Thousands of drivers zipping along Interstate 4 between Lee Road and Maitland Boulevard every day are oblivious as they pass through a demonstration zone for a telecommunications technology on the cutting edge. Small transceivers mounted on lampposts and bolted to rooftops along the route form the backbone of an electronic "mesh" - a high-speed, wireless communications web that allows properly equipped travelers to surf the Internet and place phone calls. The roadside web is a showcase for MeshNetworks Inc.'s signature technology.
BUSINESS
By Jim Finkle and Jim Finkle,THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | May 18, 2004
SANTA ANA, Calif. - Consumer advocates are looking to the courts to deal with what they say is an increase in the number of complaints about cell-phone carriers. The Foundation for Taxpayer and Consumer Rights said it's collecting the stories of upset wireless customers and organizing them in preparation for filing a new round of class action lawsuits focused on alleged overcharges and poor service. Complaints about wireless carriers have risen even though cell phones are increasingly popular.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2001
Wireless communications and the Internet played profound roles in the terrorist attacks on the United States - from the accounts of hostages on airplanes and survivors beneath the World Trade Center using cell phones to say goodbye or seek rescue, to the millions of Americans communicating in ways that weren't available to the masses a short time ago. Just as people huddled around radios for information on World War II, and television altered opinion and...
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2001
WASHINGTON - The scene, several blocks from the White House, may seem quaint, even humorous, seven or eight years from now. Microsoft Corp. and a dozen other companies, including Aether Systems Inc. of Owings Mills, set up a traveling exhibit of "smart phones" and hand-held computers this week outside the Ronald Reagan International Trade Center. Their aim: to convince people of the need for greater mobile communications in their lives. They were pleasantly surprised by the response. A few hundred people preregistered over the Internet to attend the show in Washington, held Wednesday and yesterday.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1994
Cellular deal unravelsThree key players in the rapidly expanding field of wireless communications yesterday called off plans to build a cellular telephone network that would have reached about 95 percent of jTC the U.S. population.Nextel Communications Inc., which provides mobile radio services; long-distance carrier MCI Communications Corp.; and Comcast Corp., a cable TV and cellular phone company, issued a statement saying they broke off plans to provide a nationwide wireless communications system.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The pace of shotgun weddings in the telecommunications industry accelerated yesterday as MCI Communications Corp. moved closer to joining a wireless telephone alliance with Bell Atlantic Corp. and Nynex Corp.With only 15 days left before an important regulatory deadline expires, any company with aspirations in wireless communications is scrambling to form partnerships that make it possible to establish nationwide wireless networks.MCI, the nation's No. 2 long-distance carrier, has been looking for wireless partners for months, because it wants to match AT&T Corp.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2001
Aether Systems Inc., one of the most-watched new technology companies in the Baltimore region, plans to unveil a new product today that it hopes will elevate the company at a time of great uncertainty in the wireless communications market. Aether will launch a major national marketing campaign around a product it calls "Aether Fusion." "We hope Aether Fusion becomes for Aether what Windows is for Microsoft," said spokesman Greg Abel. "This is as significant news as we've ever made." The Owings Mills company has taken a hit in recent months, along with the rest of the wireless communications sector.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2001
NEW YORK - Jacob Christfort stands before hundreds of his colleagues in the telecommunications industry trying to convince them they aren't as far behind Europe in public acceptance of wireless technology as commonly believed. "The United States has the highest concentration of mobile devices in the world," he claims and then holds aloft his proof: the humble TV remote-control. That device, comfortable for the likes of Archie Bunker and Homer Simpson, should be a blueprint for the industry as it tries to convince consumers and business people that they need to be in touch with the Internet and each other everywhere, says Christfort, chief technology officer and vice president of product development for OracleMobile, an Internet company based in Redwood Shores, Calif.
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