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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jeff Gelles and Jeff Gelles,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 23, 2001
Donald A. Redelmeier is a thorn in the side of the wireless-phone industry. The Canadian epidemiologist is the author of a leading study on the risks of driving-while-phoning - the 1997 study that said phone use quadrupled a driver's risk of being involved in an accident. Recently, after the wireless industry referred to studies of accident data as evidence that cell phones were rarely the cause of accidents, Redelmeier was back in print. His message this time: If anything, the risks are even greater than his study estimated.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Verizon Wireless said Friday that it is adding more than 100 retail and customer service jobs in Maryland, a move that comes on the heels of plans to cut about 380 jobs at a Hanover call center. The new positions will be full time and come with health insurance, Verizon said. They're part of a 300-job expansion the company plans in Maryland, Washington and Virginia. Verizon said the hiring is unrelated to cuts at the Hanover location, announced last week in a call-center restructuring.
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BUSINESS
October 16, 1997
A new way to send messages to wireless telephone users through the Internet was introduced yesterday when AT&T Wireless Services launched its new Digital Personal Communication Service in the greater Baltimore and Washington metropolitan areas."
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
They're called technology evangelists, those who trumpet benefits and trends in the Digital Age without the need of a fire-and-brimstone app. Anne Arundel Community College adjunct professor Travis Bonfigli is a self-proclaimed technology evangelist. You need not know the Crofton resident's credentials to gauge his knowledge and passion for computers — particularly all things wireless — and his penchant for conveying complex technological jargon with a "Hooked on Phonics" simplicity.
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA | May 1, 2005
Cell phones are the rule, not the exception. And their slew of services has made it possible to drop a traditional landline and go strictly wireless. The rationale is cost. The typical monthly bill for wireless service ranges from $40 to $60 and includes calls within the United States, voice mail, caller ID and call waiting (some plans include regional calls only). Taxes and fees are beginning to pile up on cellular plans in some states, but they tend to be less than surcharges levied on regular phone bills.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 21, 2004
MENTION THE words "corded telephone" to the representatives of the modern telecommunications industry and the conversation quickly goes on hold. Last week, business moguls were buzzing over the news of the $41 billion takeover of AT&T Wireless by Cingular. Meanwhile on the homefront, I was pursuing a low-tech, low-finance chore. I was trying to find a replacement part for the family's battered kitchen phone. It was an AT&T model 1820, a corded telephone with an answering system. It was at least 10 years old, maybe more.
BUSINESS
By JIM COATES and JIM COATES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 3, 2006
I work on an IBM PC, and my husband works on a Dell laptop via a wireless Internet connection. Both use a Linksys 2.4 gHz (802.11b) wireless broadband router for Web access. We connect to the Internet via a cable modem, and our Internet service provider is AOL. He has gotten messages that his signal strength is going from good to low to excellent to low, all in a matter of seconds. He is unable to connect to his office e-mail server, download files or navigate through AOL when this is happening.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2004
The merger of AT&T Wireless and Cingular Wireless into the nation's largest cellular phone carrier is likely to spark more consolidation, better service and quality, but also higher prices for consumers in the future, experts said of the stunning $41 billion cash deal struck in the pre-dawn yesterday. The combined Cingular-AT&T Wireless will have 46 million customers and revenue of more than $32 billion a year. Its digital network will serve 49 states and 97 of the top 100 wireless markets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2000
In a desperate moment before finals, a worried college student pulling an all-nighter grabs his laptop, anxious to tap into the vast world of knowledge that a wireless connection to the Internet provides. But he can't connect. His wireless Palm Pilot won't work either. Desperate, he grabs an old-fashioned cordless phone, hoping to call a friend who can answer his questions. Again he's stymied. The phone, like all the other wireless gadgets that are supposed to make it easy to get information, is overwhelmed by the transmissions of thousands of other students in a half-mile radius.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 19, 1997
SAN FRANCISCO -- AirTouch Communications Inc. said yesterday that it will buy US West Media Group Inc.'s U.S. wireless business for $5 billion in stock and assumed debt to become the nation's second largest provider of wireless services after AT&T.The purchase accelerates a 1994 plan to combine the wireless operations of the two companies in three steps over several years. The earlier plan hurt AirTouch's stock amid concern it was time-consuming and expensive, analysts said. AirTouch provides Cellular One and MobiLink wireless services.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
About 380 Verizon Wireless employees will lose their jobs at a Hanover call center as part of a national restructuring in which five centers will close and 3,000 workers will need to transfer to new offices or apply for new company jobs, the carrier told workers Wednesday. The Hanover center will not close, but will become a call center for government agency and business customers as opposed to individual consumers. It will be staffed by 320 workers who will move there from a Verizon call center in Laurel, which will remain open for other functions, said Paul Macchia, a Verizon Wireless spokesman.
NEWS
December 5, 2013
The tele-medicine phenomenon brought about by applications such as Sickweather is changing - in some cases saving - lives across America ( "Social media can help contain illness Dec. 2). It's also creating new economic opportunities for start-up tech companies and service providers who are helping to bring these technologies into our homes. The economic and social benefits of our increasingly connected nation are the result of federal policies made at a time when divided government didn't mean non-existent governing.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2013
TESSCO Technologies supplies 30,000 different products to the wireless industry, the vast majority of them the sort that the nation's cellphone users don't see or hardly notice. Antennas. Cable. Industrial surge protectors. Ceiling tile enclosures that hide wireless access points. The Hunt Valley company has a profile that's just about as low - never mind that it's one of Baltimore County's larger employers, with about 700 people in the region and another 140 out of state. Its customers know what it is - TESSCO ships 5,000 orders every workday - but the general public doesn't.
NEWS
July 29, 2013
AT&T and T-Mobile's decisions to allow more frequent device upgrades ("New AT&T plan to allow customers phone upgrades once a year," July 16) is further evidence of the growing competition for consumers in the wireless market. Soon there will be four national providers of 4G LTE service that offers mobile broadband speeds of up to 20 Mbps - speeds fast enough for virtually any video or other Internet application. Most Americans can also choose between telephone and cable broadband providers.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | July 26, 2013
  Wireless carrier MetroPCS is now offering service in Baltimore. The company says it offers nationwide 4G service and unlimited data, talk and text for $40 a month without a contract. Customers can upgrade or reduce service from month to month. The flat-fee monthly plans range from $40 to $60. Customers can choose from a variety of smart phones, such as the Samsung Galaxy S4 and Galaxy Exhibit, or bring in an old device when they sign up for services. The Baltimore rollout is part of MetroPCS's expansion in 15 new markets, among them Washington DC, Cleveland, Fresno, Ca., Houston, Memphis, New Orleans, San Antonio, San Diego and Seattle.
NEWS
February 11, 2013
The Internet could eventually be as ubiquitous as the air we breathe if the Federal Communications Commission moves forward with a plan to allow free access to an unused portion of the broadcast spectrum. The WiFi networks that would flourish on that bandwidth could powerfully transform our lives and spur massive innovation in the economy - if the idea can get past the multi-billion dollar interests standing in its way. FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski is spearheading the public WiFi effort on the grounds that it could lead to whole new industries of products and services, but the idea would also serve the agency's mission to reduce the digital divide by expanding the availability of high-speed Internet access and reducing its cost.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | April 4, 2004
It remains a mystery why so many Americans feel they must speak three times as loudly into their cell phones as they would during normal conversation. Reception is rarely that bad, and this intrusive practice leaves all of us innocent bystanders with a daily window into some of the most boring one-sided discussions ever to take place on our planet. But there's no mystery at all as to why investors in wireless service and equipment companies have plenty to shout about in 2004. The wireless services stock group, according to Morning-star Inc., is up more than 39 percent over the past 12 months.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 17, 1998
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- Alltel Corp. agreed yesterday to buy 360 Communications Co. for $5.89 billion in stock and assumed debt to expand its wireless phone business in the Southeastern United States.Alltel will swap 0.74 share for each share of Chicago-based 360 Communications, the wireless company spun off from Sprint Corp. two years ago. Holders of 360 will get $33.21 a share based on Friday's closing price.Companies in the $200 billion-a-year U.S. phone industry are teaming up to lure customers with a range of products.
NEWS
By Seth Cooper | December 10, 2012
Today's economy has been tough on Maryland's small businesses. With consumers struggling with less disposable income and the state's unemployment rate stuck stubbornly high at near 7 percent, businesses have had to cut costs and tighten their belts any way they can. Unfortunately, outdated tax policies are adding to our economic burdens. Despite weak growth and the threat of another recession, taxes on the wireless services used by nearly every Maryland business continue to rise.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Baltimore's six historic public markets should be equipped with Wi-Fi before the year's end, the city's new Chief Information Officer said Thursday. Chris Tonjes, who runs the Mayor's Office of Information Technology, said it should cost less than $25,000 to equip five markets - Avenue, Broadway Market, Cross Street, Hollins and Northeast - with the service. The upgrade of Lexington Market - the city's best known and first to receive the upgrade - will be funded by a donation from Believe Wireless Broadband, which is giving the city the equipment and bandwidth for the project, officials said.
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