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By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
A pair of du Pont cousins, one in love with a woman and the other devoted to plants, used their vast family fortune to create a pair of mansions within minutes of each other in the Brandywine Valley, but from two very different worlds. Alfred I. du Pont, who grew up among the "powder men" his father employed and used his genius to expand the family's explosives business and save it from sale, poured his heart and a considerable fortune into building Nemours, which takes its inspiration from Marie Antoinette's Petit Trianon at Versailles and is a tribute to the family's French heritage.
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By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
A pair of du Pont cousins, one in love with a woman and the other devoted to plants, used their vast family fortune to create a pair of mansions within minutes of each other in the Brandywine Valley, but from two very different worlds. Alfred I. du Pont, who grew up among the "powder men" his father employed and used his genius to expand the family's explosives business and save it from sale, poured his heart and a considerable fortune into building Nemours, which takes its inspiration from Marie Antoinette's Petit Trianon at Versailles and is a tribute to the family's French heritage.
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By New York Times News Service | September 13, 1992
Winterthur, the museum of American decorative arts near Wilmington, Del., is taking a step toward greater accessibility this fall with the opening of a gallery in a new 22,000-square-foot exhibition building. The museum stands on the former 980-acre estate of the late Henry Francis du Pont. Previously its holdings of 89,000 objects could be seen only on a guided tour.The gallery, scheduled to open Oct. 10, is the first of three being built adjacent to the museum.The building is intended to offer a more flexible tour structure, to reach a larger public, and to improve access by visitors using wheelchairs and those who do not speak English.
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By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2011
Online refer: For more garden photos, go to baltimoresun.com/travel. For more information on gardening, read Susan Reimer 's blog at baltimoresun.com/gardenvariety When Cheval Opp retired from IBM, she knew exactly what she would do with her time. Visit gardens. "My whole life at IBM, whenever they would send me anywhere, I would take an extra day or a weekend and visit gardens," she said. "When I realized I'd be retiring and I could do anything I wanted, I knew what it would be. " Now Opp helps travelers and day trippers arrange tours of the many public gardens in the Mid-Atlantic area.
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By BETH SMITH | October 24, 1993
When Gary and Robin Houston chose the wallpaper for the dining room of their home in Baltimore County, they did so because they loved the formal pattern and the colors. Two centuries earlier, the Phelps and Hatheway families in Suffield, Conn., must have felt the same way."Fontaine de Fleurs," with urns, flowers, swags and birds, was hand-blocked in Paris by Jean Baptiste Reveillon around 1791 and installed in the Phelps-Hatheway House sometime between 1794 and 1796. Discovered there by Henry Francis du Pont, America's premier connoisseur and collector of 17th-, 18th- and 19th-century American decorative arts, the wallpaper was carefully removed and then hung in the Federal parlor at Winterthur, du Pont's country home near Wilmington, Del., now a public museum.
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By Lita Solis-Cohen | November 1, 1992
Election day makes people look back at American history, and there's no better place to see the past than Winterthur, the sprawling mansion on 1,000 rolling acres in Delaware, where Henry Francis du Pont arranged the largest and finest assemblage of Americana. Du Pont transformed his family seat into a public museum so others could share the ultimate collector's treasures, his passion for American history, and his respect for the traditions of American craftsmanship.Beginning in 1952, visitors, four at a time, were led by guides with flashlights through nearly 200 period rooms faintly lit by electrified candles and filled with the sweet scents of home-grown fresh flowers.
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By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Contributing Writer | April 30, 1995
The Winterthur Point-to-Point Races in Winterthur, Del., May 7 is an opportunity to see areas of the Winterthur estate not often seen by the public. This year's race-goer will find many new attractions, too.An international race will bring some of Europe's best riders to compete in a 3 1/8 -mile flat race. Race-goers can also enter their pets in a canine jumping event similar to equestrian jumping events with competitions for small, medium and large dogs. There's a new family tent with activities for children and a marketplace with area shops and crafts people.
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By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | April 1, 2001
As I pass beneath the arbor and bend down to enter the stone Faerie Cottage in the Enchanted Woods, I am transported back to the games of imagination that my brother and I played as children. We had woods and a stream, but we never had a setting as filled with magical possibility as this. The thatched-roof stone Faerie Cottage looks like Beowulf's great hall on a child's scale, with an oak-leaf chandelier and marble-frame fireplace. The cottage is the centerpiece of the Enchanted Woods, the first newly created garden at Winterthur in 30 years.
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By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | April 22, 2006
I have the kind of backyard garden where, despite my best efforts, everything is slightly askew. Instead of growing straight and tall, my camellias lean precipitously forward as if they were hailing a taxi. At 18 inches high, my tulips and daffodils loom over newly planted, miniature shrubs. Isn't it supposed to be the other way around? So in one sense, a visit to two of the nation's foremost flower bowers -- Winterthur and Longwood gardens -- was a lesson in abject humiliation. At Winterthur, every arrestingly asymmetrical tree, every thickly branched bush, seems to be under the care of its own individual, full-time gardener.
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1999
WINTERTHUR, Del. -- One of the most startling objects in "KiDS!: 200 Years of Childhood," at the Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library, is a "walking stool." It is a rigid, late-18th century contraption on wheels, designed to help babies learn to walk.Also known as a "go-cart," the stool, which has no seat, was thought to strengthen tiny limbs and prevented crawling, an enterprise some deemed unseemingly "animalistic."This wooden relic would appall most parents today. Beyond illustrating antique child-rearing theories, though, it begs a provocative question: What hasn't changed over centuries of child-rearing?
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By LORI SEARS | June 4, 2006
All that jazz It's a celebration of jazz all this week in Wilmington, Del. More than 25 jazz musicians and groups will take part in the 18th annual DuPont Clifford Brown Jazz Festival, today through June 11 at several Wilmington venues. The festival honors the memory of jazz trumpeter and Wilmington native Clifford Brown, whose life was cut short in 1956 at the age of 25. Many festival performers will play Brown's songs and present other works in tribute to him. Kicking the festival off will be the Count Basie Orchestra, presenting an outdoor concert in the Winterthur Garden at 4 p.m. today.
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By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | April 22, 2006
I have the kind of backyard garden where, despite my best efforts, everything is slightly askew. Instead of growing straight and tall, my camellias lean precipitously forward as if they were hailing a taxi. At 18 inches high, my tulips and daffodils loom over newly planted, miniature shrubs. Isn't it supposed to be the other way around? So in one sense, a visit to two of the nation's foremost flower bowers -- Winterthur and Longwood gardens -- was a lesson in abject humiliation. At Winterthur, every arrestingly asymmetrical tree, every thickly branched bush, seems to be under the care of its own individual, full-time gardener.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Natasha Lesser and Natasha Lesser,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 20, 2004
Flowers, flowers, and more flowers (plus lots of trees, plants and grass) -- that's what you'll find at Longwood Gardens and Winterthur, two enormous and elaborate gardens just outside Wilmington, Del. Between the two, there are millions of flowers and plants, and miles of paths, lawns and groves. The gardens, which are 90 minutes north of Baltimore, were once estates in the du Pont family, owned by men who loved gardening and spent decades -- and lots of money -- creating their leafy masterpieces.
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By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Special to the Sun | June 8, 2003
Ladew, Longwood, Brookside, Winterthur -- standout gardens familiar to many Marylanders. But those shouldn't be the only botanical destinations on your map. There are other gardens -- less well-known but just as impressive -- all within a two-hour drive of Baltimore. No better time than now to explore them. What's so significant about these almost-secret gardens? Diversity. No two are alike. There's an outdoor sculpture garden and a natural habitat with indigenous plants. Wildflower gardens and woodland trails, along with formal gardens accompanied by historic houses -- even one with an archaeological dig. We have geography and climate to thank for much of this diversity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVE GORDON | November 28, 2002
If you're looking for an enchanting start to your Christmas holiday season, Enchanted Woods at Winterthur is just the place to find it. The DuPont country estate in Winterthur, Del., north of Wilmington, will be decorated with thousands of holiday lights every Thursday, Friday and Saturday, beginning tomorrow and continuing to Dec. 28. Families can stroll beneath the 500 multicolored lighted spheres and globes that decorate trees and gaze on the other...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | December 16, 2004
Winterthur wonderland Step into a winter wonderland at Winterthur, an American Country Estate, in Winterthur, Del., tomorrow through Dec. 23 and Dec. 26 through Jan. 1. Winterthur's Nights of Enchanted Lights is a nightly music and lights show at the estate's Enchanted Woods. Thousands of holiday lights will adorn the children's garden. Cobweb the storyteller fairy will spin tales. Children can help decorate the Enchanted Woods with evergreen boughs. And community choirs and singing groups will perform for visitors each night.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVE GORDON | November 28, 2002
If you're looking for an enchanting start to your Christmas holiday season, Enchanted Woods at Winterthur is just the place to find it. The DuPont country estate in Winterthur, Del., north of Wilmington, will be decorated with thousands of holiday lights every Thursday, Friday and Saturday, beginning tomorrow and continuing to Dec. 28. Families can stroll beneath the 500 multicolored lighted spheres and globes that decorate trees and gaze on the other...
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