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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1998
EASTON -- In the battle to stem the flow of harmful nutrients into the Chesapeake Bay, the investment in cover crops is money well spent. That was the message to farmers from New York to North Carolina yesterday from the opening round of a two-day conference on the benefits of nutrient-absorbing planting sponsored by the University of Maryland's College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and its Cooperative Extension Service. While nobody disputed the benefits of cover crops -- the planting of such nitrogen absorbing crops as winter wheat, rye and barley after the fall harvest -- there were some questions about whether it is economically viable for farmers.
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NEWS
By Bess Keller | November 23, 2012
As the growing season winds down, one Baltimore City school garden has harvested next to nothing. A project intended to enliven lessons or inspire healthier eating came down to four neglected beds yielding two cinder-block-sized zucchini. The garden brings to mind an all-too-common twist on the line from the movie "Field of Dreams": If you build it, they won't necessarily come. School-community collaborations like this project have a lot to recommend them and are a favored vehicle for doing more with less at schools.
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NEWS
September 17, 2000
Q. I like the idea of building my garden soil by planting a cover crop. But most of my veggies are still going strong. I don't want to pull them up to make room for plants I can't eat. What's an organic gardener to do? A. Here are a few ways around your dilemma: 1)Remove the mulch from around your plants and between your rows and sow a cover crop on the bare soil. The young cover crops won't interfere with your vegetable harvest. 2) Pull up any spent vegetable plants and sow cover crop seed in their place.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 7, 2003
EVEREST, Kan. - Kevin Compton, a 48-year-old farmer, recently walked in his cornfield to inspect the damage from a summer-long drought. He tore open an ear of corn and grimaced. "Look at this little bitty ear," he said, revealing a stunted, partly rotted corn cob. "This won't amount to nothing. Everything's gone." Compton then hopped in his Ford Explorer and drove a mile east to inspect some soybean acreage. It was even worse. "You see these spots?" he said, fingering a withering, pale-green soybean pod. "These are dying.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 7, 2003
EVEREST, Kan. - Kevin Compton, a 48-year-old farmer, recently walked in his cornfield to inspect the damage from a summer-long drought. He tore open an ear of corn and grimaced. "Look at this little bitty ear," he said, revealing a stunted, partly rotted corn cob. "This won't amount to nothing. Everything's gone." Compton then hopped in his Ford Explorer and drove a mile east to inspect some soybean acreage. It was even worse. "You see these spots?" he said, fingering a withering, pale-green soybean pod. "These are dying.
NEWS
By Bess Keller | November 23, 2012
As the growing season winds down, one Baltimore City school garden has harvested next to nothing. A project intended to enliven lessons or inspire healthier eating came down to four neglected beds yielding two cinder-block-sized zucchini. The garden brings to mind an all-too-common twist on the line from the movie "Field of Dreams": If you build it, they won't necessarily come. School-community collaborations like this project have a lot to recommend them and are a favored vehicle for doing more with less at schools.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | September 28, 1992
UNIONTOWN -- Bob Bounds' soybeans, like those of other farmers around the state, are in a race for their life against fall's first killer frost.In a rolling field of dark green knee-high bean plants still wet from the night's dew, Mr. Bounds bends down and pulls one from the soil. "Look here," he said, holding out a 2-inch bean pod. "It's the 24th of September and the pods are still flat. They should have beans in them by this time."Part of his bean crop may not reach maturity until the end of October or early November, he estimates.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | December 30, 1997
Maryland farmers are about to close the book on 1997, and it won't have a happy ending."It was a mixed year," said M. Bruce West, chief statistician with the Maryland Department of Agriculture, as he scanned the numbers that tell the story of how well or how poorly individual segments of the farming community fared during 1997.Robert Raver agreed with West's assessment."The year started off great and ended in disaster," said the western Montgomery County grain farmer."I had the best winter wheat crop ever; my yield went off the chart.
NEWS
June 8, 2003
Hay and corn crops suffering under cold, wet weather The cornstalks in the soggy fields at Richard Holloway's farm just outside Darlington stand 3 to 4 inches tall. They should be twice that tall, said the Harford County grower who farms 900 acres. He blames the small plants on too much of a good thing - too much rain to give the corn the warm sunshine needed for healthy growth. It's not just his corn that is being affected by one of the wettest springs on record. "The thing that is hurting us the most is the hay crop," he said.
NEWS
By ANNE STINSON | October 6, 1992
Easton.--Moochers. Lazy bums who feed at the public trough. Welfare cheats. The majestic Canada geese, lolling out summer days at Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, are running a scam. They're not doing what they're supposed to do, and they're mucking up things for their law-abiding brethren.The laws of goose behavior are fairly simple. In the lengthening days of March, they yield to the imperatives of nature. It's time to get serious about parenthood, and they gear up for the long trek to their summer breeding grounds, the Ungava Peninsula on Canada's upper Hudson Bay. There they spend the summer nesting and rearing their young to adolescence.
NEWS
June 8, 2003
Hay and corn crops suffering under cold, wet weather The cornstalks in the soggy fields at Richard Holloway's farm just outside Darlington stand 3 to 4 inches tall. They should be twice that tall, said the Harford County grower who farms 900 acres. He blames the small plants on too much of a good thing - too much rain to give the corn the warm sunshine needed for healthy growth. It's not just his corn that is being affected by one of the wettest springs on record. "The thing that is hurting us the most is the hay crop," he said.
NEWS
September 17, 2000
Q. I like the idea of building my garden soil by planting a cover crop. But most of my veggies are still going strong. I don't want to pull them up to make room for plants I can't eat. What's an organic gardener to do? A. Here are a few ways around your dilemma: 1)Remove the mulch from around your plants and between your rows and sow a cover crop on the bare soil. The young cover crops won't interfere with your vegetable harvest. 2) Pull up any spent vegetable plants and sow cover crop seed in their place.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1998
EASTON -- In the battle to stem the flow of harmful nutrients into the Chesapeake Bay, the investment in cover crops is money well spent. That was the message to farmers from New York to North Carolina yesterday from the opening round of a two-day conference on the benefits of nutrient-absorbing planting sponsored by the University of Maryland's College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and its Cooperative Extension Service. While nobody disputed the benefits of cover crops -- the planting of such nitrogen absorbing crops as winter wheat, rye and barley after the fall harvest -- there were some questions about whether it is economically viable for farmers.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | December 30, 1997
Maryland farmers are about to close the book on 1997, and it won't have a happy ending."It was a mixed year," said M. Bruce West, chief statistician with the Maryland Department of Agriculture, as he scanned the numbers that tell the story of how well or how poorly individual segments of the farming community fared during 1997.Robert Raver agreed with West's assessment."The year started off great and ended in disaster," said the western Montgomery County grain farmer."I had the best winter wheat crop ever; my yield went off the chart.
NEWS
By ANNE STINSON | October 6, 1992
Easton.--Moochers. Lazy bums who feed at the public trough. Welfare cheats. The majestic Canada geese, lolling out summer days at Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, are running a scam. They're not doing what they're supposed to do, and they're mucking up things for their law-abiding brethren.The laws of goose behavior are fairly simple. In the lengthening days of March, they yield to the imperatives of nature. It's time to get serious about parenthood, and they gear up for the long trek to their summer breeding grounds, the Ungava Peninsula on Canada's upper Hudson Bay. There they spend the summer nesting and rearing their young to adolescence.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | September 28, 1992
UNIONTOWN -- Bob Bounds' soybeans, like those of other farmers around the state, are in a race for their life against fall's first killer frost.In a rolling field of dark green knee-high bean plants still wet from the night's dew, Mr. Bounds bends down and pulls one from the soil. "Look here," he said, holding out a 2-inch bean pod. "It's the 24th of September and the pods are still flat. They should have beans in them by this time."Part of his bean crop may not reach maturity until the end of October or early November, he estimates.
NEWS
May 19, 1991
The Carroll Soil Conservation District has purchased a new 10-inch Brillion Seeder, available for rent to farmers.The new equipment, as well as an 8-inch Brillion Seeder, gives farmers an opportunity torent a seeder if their low volume rate doesn't justify buying one.District members are encouraging the use of this piece of equipment, regarded as the best method for planting grasses and legumes in conventional prepared seedbeds.The seeder has a drawbar hitch and can be towed behind a farm tractor or pickup.
FEATURES
August 30, 1998
Q. I like the idea of improving my vegetable-garden soil this winter with a cover crop, but I want to let my peppers, tomatoes, eggplant and cucumbers produce until frost. Will any cover crops grow in November?A. No. The hardiest cover crops are winter rye and winter wheat, and they must be planted by Oct. 1 to make a few inches of growth before the first hard freeze. There is a solution, however. You could plant a cover crop during the next few weeks by removing any mulch around your vegetable plants and sowing your cover-crop seed between your vegetable plants, and in walkways and other bare areas.
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