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SPORTS
By NANCY NOYES | January 10, 1993
Sailors commonly use the slang term "rags" for those big pieces of fabric on their boats, but no sailor wants to have rags on his boat when he's ready to go sailing.Modern sails are strong and durable, but they are also some of the most delicate parts of a boat. They require a certain amount of care in winter to maximize longevity and performance, particularly over wet and chilly Chesapeake Bay winters."At the very least the sails should come off the boat and be folded neatly, then stored in a warm, dry place," said Annapolis Hood sailmaker Rob Emmet.
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NEWS
By Natalie Harvey and Natalie Harvey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 1997
THE NEXT time you stroll around Baltimore's Inner Harbor, notice the carousel near the Maryland Science Center.It's Columbian!Columbians had a hand in it being there -- and in its bright and attractive colors.Richard Knight and his wife, Heidi, of Allview own the 1912 antique merry-go-round.Richard Knight purchased it from a Towanda, N.Y., collector, although Clarkston, Mich. was its original home.Not long after his purchase, he and Hammond High School art teacher Peggy Coulson both had the same idea while discussing the time and skills needed to keep the hand-carved folk-art animals in good repair.
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NEWS
By Natalie Harvey and Natalie Harvey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 1997
THE NEXT time you stroll around Baltimore's Inner Harbor, notice the carousel near the Maryland Science Center.It's Columbian!Columbians had a hand in it being there -- and in its bright and attractive colors.Richard Knight and his wife, Heidi, of Allview own the 1912 antique merry-go-round.Richard Knight purchased it from a Towanda, N.Y., collector, although Clarkston, Mich. was its original home.Not long after his purchase, he and Hammond High School art teacher Peggy Coulson both had the same idea while discussing the time and skills needed to keep the hand-carved folk-art animals in good repair.
SPORTS
By NANCY NOYES | January 10, 1993
Sailors commonly use the slang term "rags" for those big pieces of fabric on their boats, but no sailor wants to have rags on his boat when he's ready to go sailing.Modern sails are strong and durable, but they are also some of the most delicate parts of a boat. They require a certain amount of care in winter to maximize longevity and performance, particularly over wet and chilly Chesapeake Bay winters."At the very least the sails should come off the boat and be folded neatly, then stored in a warm, dry place," said Annapolis Hood sailmaker Rob Emmet.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | November 26, 2008
Sweet potatoes, like fine cabernets, get better with age. Fresh out of the ground, they are considered "green" and have a high degree of starch. But if handled properly, their starch converts to sugar and, when cooked, sweet potatoes live up to their sugary appellation. At harvest, they bruise easily and are coaxed from sandy soil with a rubber-coated chain. That is what Robert Knopp Jr., whose family has been growing sweet potatoes in Anne Arundel County for three generations, uses on his Severn farm.
SPORTS
October 10, 2004
Boat wintering tips from Boating, the world's largest powerboat magazine, and BoatUS: Remove electronic gear. Take valuables home. Take all flammables and food ashore for storage. Take bimini home for cleaning. If boat will remain in the water all winter, protect thru-hulls by closing seacocks and gate valves. Open hatches, drawers and ice chests to allow air circulation and slow mildew buildup. Gas and diesel users should top off tanks and add gas stabilizers. Remember that old gas loses its octane rating over time.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | November 25, 1992
A major Canton condominium development site will go to auction Dec. 17 when A. J. Billig & Co. tries to sell land once slated to become Lighthouse Point, a luxury development that fell victim to the recession.The land for the stalled development is being sold on behalf of Maryland National Bank, said Jack F. Billig, head of the auction firm.The developers, Baltimore International Yachting Centre L.P., owed Maryland National $8.65 million on June 1, representing money borrowed against the 7.9-acre tract on Boston Street.
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | December 15, 2011
Mockingbirds, sparrows and squirrels have been feasting on the few remaining apples hanging from our Yellow Delicious tree. I purposely left the apples on the tree, you see, to give them a helping hand. The apples won't be hanging from the tree much longer, though. So shortly, I'll set-up our winter holidays animal-feeding station, a homemade holiday wreath that's stuffed with blemished apples that are in winter storage and won't keep. The first holiday wreaths were made by the ancient Greeks, Romans and Persians.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2004
A $3 million, state-of-the-art pleasure boat storage facility is being built in a marina on Norman Creek in eastern Baltimore County in preparation for a scheduled opening in May. The three-level "boatel" will occupy more than an acre at Sunset Harbor Marina and will have the capacity to store craft up to 40 feet long, said marina co-owner John Polek, who is also president of the Baltimore County Marine Trades Association. Polek said the facility is the first of its kind in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2002
SPRING ONIONS SPRING UP Spring onions are in the produce aisles ready to flavor a variety of salads and lightly cooked dishes. The Vidalia Sweets are among the most famous of this kind of onion, but there is also the Texas SuperSweet, Grand Canyon Sweets, Maui Sweets, Walla Walla Sweets and Nu-Mex Sweets. All of these onions have a higher water content than fall and winter storage onions. The water gives spring onions their mild flavor, but makes them more susceptible to bruising. The National Onion Association advises storing spring onions in a cool, dry, well-ventilated place - not the refrigerator and not in plastic bags.
FEATURES
By Nancy Brachey and Nancy Brachey,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 1996
A young woman I know, new to gardening and enthusiastic, was amazed recently when morning glories bloomed out of nowhere on her fence.Someone probably had planted the morning glories one previous spring, and the blooms dropped seeds that sprang into life this year.That is nature's way.Plants regenerate themselves by shedding seeds on the ground, seeds that lie dormant until the temperature is right and they germinate, usually the next spring.In the garden, that works for a number of popular garden flowers such as morning glories, impatiens, larkspur and poppies, whose seeds will survive winter's chill.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | March 31, 2007
I tried out a new rite of spring recently, bike bouncing. It works like this. You haul your bicycle out of winter storage, you lift it up about 5 inches, and then you let it bounce off the ground. You listen for unusual rattles indicating loose parts that are about to fall off. Initially, I was suspicious of this maneuver. But the more I thought about it, the more sense it made to me. If a bike part were destined to fall, it would be better to have it take its tumble in the quietude of the backyard rather than when I was cycling across Charles Street at rush hour.
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