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HEALTH
By Rachel Ernzen, For The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post is from Rachel Ernzen. This time of year, consider featuring local winter squash. Winter squash packs a nutritional punch and its varieties are rich in fiber, vitamin A and potassium. There are many markets and grocery stores that offer produce grown within the state or from neighboring states. Here's a sampling of fun facts, tidbits and some suggestions for serving winter squash (generalizations of recipes I have at home or have made up)
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HEALTH
By Rachel Ernzen, For The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post is from Rachel Ernzen. This time of year, consider featuring local winter squash. Winter squash packs a nutritional punch and its varieties are rich in fiber, vitamin A and potassium. There are many markets and grocery stores that offer produce grown within the state or from neighboring states. Here's a sampling of fun facts, tidbits and some suggestions for serving winter squash (generalizations of recipes I have at home or have made up)
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FEATURES
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,Orange County Register | March 4, 1992
They come in a dizzying array of colors, from cool greens to warm yellows and oranges. There are rounded ones. Fluted ones. Smooth ones. Bumpy ones.They're plentiful, versatile and economical, too.Winter squash. Their hard skin and large seeds distinguish them from their soft-skinned cousins, the summer squash.Unlike summer squash (such as zucchini), which are picked when the seeds and skin are still edible, winter squash are harvested when fully mature. In the maturation process, the seeds become woody and large.
NEWS
By Lauren Chapin and Lauren Chapin,McClatchy-Tribune | January 3, 2007
Baked acorn squash was my breakthrough vegetable, the first one I voluntarily dared to put in my mouth. Until then I was your basic potatoes and sweet corn kid. I camouflaged peas in my mashed potatoes and held my nose when I ate green beans. Beets, okra, tomatoes, cucumbers - wouldn't touch 'em, even if we'd grown them in our garden. But I doctored up the already-sweet flesh of acorn squash with brown sugar and butter and mmm, a veggie almost as good as a piece of pumpkin pie. As luck would have it, I grew up - and grew to love all those vegetables I used to turn up my nose at, especially roasted beets.
FEATURES
By Carol J. G. Ward and Carol J. G. Ward,Knight Ridder/Tribune | January 27, 1999
Winter squashes and pumpkins capture the imagination with their kaleidoscope of shapes, sizes and colors. They are hearty, versatile vegetables with a rich history as one of the mainstays of American Indian diets.Members of the gourd family, winter squashes have hard, thick shells and deep yellow to orange flesh with a buttery, slightly sweet flavor. They are high in beta-carotene and provide good amounts of potassium, fiber and vitamin C.Winter squashes are firmer than summer squashes and therefore require longer cooking.
NEWS
By Elinor Klivans and Elinor Klivans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 5, 2003
Sweet dumpling, buttercup, butternut, delicata - even the names of winter squash are tempting. And, these winter squash live up to their names. From appetizer to dessert, winter squash fit in anywhere. Their sweet flesh ranges from deep-golden to darkest orange and adds welcome color to winter dishes. They are low in calories, rich in fiber, and those golden-orange colors signal that they are a good source of beta carotene and vitamin A. Winter squash keep for months and are easy on the budget.
FEATURES
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 18, 1998
Winter squash are the emblems of fall: cream-colored Sweet Dumpling, striated with hunter-green lines; knobbly Hubbard, powdery blue and flecked with buff-colored nodes; two-toned, turban-shaped buttercup; and Lakota, a bright orange-and-green Native American heirloom.Gathered in artful array, they make beautiful decorations. More important, they are a great source of beta carotene and vitamins. What distinguishes winter squash from summer squash is their low moisture content, which translates into a spectacular ability to keep and retain their nutritional value.
NEWS
By RUSS PARSONS and RUSS PARSONS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 11, 2006
Off the vine, winter squash look like some kind of exotic rustic pottery, with rich colors and textures that give them the appearance of having been elaborately carved and colored. That beauty makes them one of nature's more versatile vegetables: Until you're ready to eat, you've got a holiday centerpiece. But once you cook them, they transform completely, that ceramic hardness giving way to a nearly creamy texture and a subtle, nutty sweetness. Of course, that's not going to happen with just any winter squash.
NEWS
January 17, 1999
Choose firm, hard-skinned winter squash that are heavy for their size. When selecting a quantity to store, choose squash with an inch of stem left on; handle carefully to avoid bruising. Whole winter squash in good condition will keep for up to three months in a dark, dry, cool (50 degrees) place. Refrigerate cut squash and use within a week. -- Cole's Cooking A to Z
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | January 10, 1999
When the menu calls for spiced custard pie, squash the impulse to reach for canned pumpkin. Instead, consider a tart filled with something a bit more posh: acorn, banana, buttercup, butternut, Hubbard, sweetmeat, Tahitian or turban winter squash. All of these have a mellow flavor and fine-grained texture that makes a delicate custard filling.Prepare winter squash the same way you'd cook pumpkin: Cut it into halves or quarters, depending on the size of the squash, and bake it cut-side down in a 350-degree oven until tender (from 40 minutes to 1 hour)
NEWS
By Marge Perry and Marge Perry,NEWSDAY | October 29, 2006
This sweet and savory risotto is not difficult to make, but does take about 30 minutes of fairly constant attention. Add a salad to make it a meal. To peel any of the smooth-skinned winter squash such as butternut, use a vegetable peeler. Acorn squash, full of ridges that make peeling trickier, is more easily prepared by cooking it right in the skin. Most winter squash can be kept for several months in a cool dry place. Marge Perry writes for Newsday, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By RUSS PARSONS and RUSS PARSONS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 11, 2006
Off the vine, winter squash look like some kind of exotic rustic pottery, with rich colors and textures that give them the appearance of having been elaborately carved and colored. That beauty makes them one of nature's more versatile vegetables: Until you're ready to eat, you've got a holiday centerpiece. But once you cook them, they transform completely, that ceramic hardness giving way to a nearly creamy texture and a subtle, nutty sweetness. Of course, that's not going to happen with just any winter squash.
NEWS
December 11, 2005
This recipe, adapted from The America's Test Kitchen Family Cookbook, by Christopher Kimball and his staff at Cook's Illustrated, calls for delicata or acorn squash but will work with any winter squash. Cooking times will vary depending on the squash's size. "Make sure that you cook the squash until it is very tender," the authors note. "It is one of the few vegetables whose texture improves as it cooks." ROASTED WINTER SQUASH WITH SOY-MAPLE GLAZE Makes 4 servings 3 tablespoons pure maple syrup 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1 / 2 teaspoon grated gingerroot 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 acorn or delicata squash, halved, seeded 1 / 2 teaspoon salt, optional Freshly ground pepper Move oven rack to lower-middle position; heat oven to 400 degrees.
NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 21, 2005
Although some describe it as resembling a miniature flying saucer, pattypan squash is named for the tiny pattypan tins used to bake miniature English tarts and pies. Pattypan, like all summersquash varieties, is distinguished from winter squash by the stage of maturity it reaches before being harvested - not by the season of ripening. In The Compleat Squash: A Passionate G r o w e r ' s Guide to Pumpkins, Squash and Gourds, Amy Goldman describes pattypan, zucchini and other summer squash as those being ready for harvesting within one week of flowering.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | May 8, 2005
Summer squash used to be the Rodney Dangerfield of the vegetable garden. It got absolutely no respect -- partly because supply often outstripped demand. Jokes abounded about leaving baskets of squash like abandoned babies on doorsteps in the dead of night. There weren't many varieties to chose from, either. Zucchini, yellow crookneck and cymling (now called pattypan) were pretty much it. But that's all changed. Now, there are dozens of varieties available that range from creamy, nubbly, star-shaped, to goose-necked, rib-backed and bulbous.
NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld & Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld & Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | September 5, 2004
How do I get rid of yellow jackets? One group flies beneath the porch, another under a small shrub. Yellow jackets are beneficial predators of pests such as flies and mosquitoes early in the season, so we do not recommend nest eradication unless it is in a problem location (e.g., by a walkway or where mowing disturbs them). If they pose a danger, eliminate them with a can of hornet and wasp spray, readily available at a hardware or grocery store. There are many manufacturers, all satisfactory.
NEWS
December 11, 2005
This recipe, adapted from The America's Test Kitchen Family Cookbook, by Christopher Kimball and his staff at Cook's Illustrated, calls for delicata or acorn squash but will work with any winter squash. Cooking times will vary depending on the squash's size. "Make sure that you cook the squash until it is very tender," the authors note. "It is one of the few vegetables whose texture improves as it cooks." ROASTED WINTER SQUASH WITH SOY-MAPLE GLAZE Makes 4 servings 3 tablespoons pure maple syrup 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1 / 2 teaspoon grated gingerroot 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 acorn or delicata squash, halved, seeded 1 / 2 teaspoon salt, optional Freshly ground pepper Move oven rack to lower-middle position; heat oven to 400 degrees.
NEWS
By Elinor Klivans and Elinor Klivans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 5, 2003
Sweet dumpling, buttercup, butternut, delicata - even the names of winter squash are tempting. And, these winter squash live up to their names. From appetizer to dessert, winter squash fit in anywhere. Their sweet flesh ranges from deep-golden to darkest orange and adds welcome color to winter dishes. They are low in calories, rich in fiber, and those golden-orange colors signal that they are a good source of beta carotene and vitamin A. Winter squash keep for months and are easy on the budget.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2002
On an unseasonably warm winter day, I walk around the garden, trying to imagine what it will look like in July. It's a kind of planning perambulation before sitting down with the seed catalogs. As I gaze across the space that until last year held 30-odd tomato plants annually - enough for 60 quarts of homemade spaghetti sauce, 50 of canned tomatoes with bushels to spare - I suddenly feel as though somewhere along the line, I've lost the vision thing. I can't quite imagine what next summer's garden is supposed to look like.
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