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By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Contributing Writer | November 13, 1992
Two things the performers of the Winter Solstice Concert at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts want you to know: It's not a Christmas concert, and it's not New Age music.When the Winter Solstice tour first came to Annapolis three years ago, the sponsor, Windham Hill Records, said that the concert helped celebrate the anticipated increase of daylight as the dead of winter slowly gives way to the rebirth of spring.But there is another emphasis to the Nov. 20 concert."People have become so tarnished by the marketplace," pianist Philip Aaberg says.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: HALCYON It starts with a bird. The ancients thought that there was a bird, the halcyon, probably a kind of kingfisher, that made its nest in the sea during the winter solstice, calming the wind and the waves. That period of calm was called the halcyon days , the fourteen days that the bird was supposedly brooding.
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NEWS
By Edith Maynard | December 2, 2012
How the days and months seem to have melted away - melted away from dawns to darkest evenings that arrive earlier each day. We are now approaching "the darkest evening of the year," as one of our favorite American poets, Robert Frost, mentioned at the end of the second stanza of perhaps his most famous poem, "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening. " The winter solstice will arrive on Dec. 21 this year and is the time of the shortest day and longest, and darkest, evening of the year, which marks the beginning of winter.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2013
March's full moon arrives Wednesday morning, the first to fall after the vernal equinox. It is the fourth full moon after the winter solstice, something that usually falls in April. This full moon is known by names including Grass Moon, Egg Moon, Growing Moon, Waking Moon and Pink Moon. But if you ask sources like the Farmer's Almanac or Old Farmer's Almanac, it is the Full Worm Moon. In ancient times, the naming of full moons was dependent on where they fell relative to events like the winter solstice or vernal equinox, but modern usage sticks with the same moon name for any given month.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
We are still about two weeks away from the shortest day of the year, but after Friday night, the early winter sunsets will start shifting later again. The difference between sunset times from Dec. 2 through Dec. 11 is a matter of seconds, all at about 4:43 p.m. in Baltimore. About in the middle of that span is Friday's sunset, after which the darkness starts arriving slightly later each night. The days, however, continue growing shorter until the winter solstice on Dec. 21. Sunrise will continue shifting later in the morning until about Jan. 6, when it peaks at about 7:26 a.m. So, why isn't the earliest sunset and latest sunrise on the winter solstice?
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | November 1, 2009
It's the first Sunday in November. Do you know how to turn your clocks back? It's also Samhain, a Celtic "cross-quarter day," halfway between the autumnal equinox and the winter solstice. It was celebrated as the start of winter and the new year. There were elements of a harvest festival, too, with large gatherings and bonfires, and a festival of the dead, with echoes in our Halloween.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: HALCYON It starts with a bird. The ancients thought that there was a bird, the halcyon, probably a kind of kingfisher, that made its nest in the sea during the winter solstice, calming the wind and the waves. That period of calm was called the halcyon days , the fourteen days that the bird was supposedly brooding.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2013
March's full moon arrives Wednesday morning, the first to fall after the vernal equinox. It is the fourth full moon after the winter solstice, something that usually falls in April. This full moon is known by names including Grass Moon, Egg Moon, Growing Moon, Waking Moon and Pink Moon. But if you ask sources like the Farmer's Almanac or Old Farmer's Almanac, it is the Full Worm Moon. In ancient times, the naming of full moons was dependent on where they fell relative to events like the winter solstice or vernal equinox, but modern usage sticks with the same moon name for any given month.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
The moon reaches its “fullest” phase at 3:26 p.m. today, so when it rises at about 6:05 p.m., it will be shining brightly, with clear skies expected. The International Space Station will meanwhile make a few passes over Maryland this week, but clouds could block it. You might call it the "Full Snow Moon," which is the name the Farmer's Almanac and Old Farmer's Almanac call February's full moon. February was often the snowiest month of the year for  Algonquin American Indian tribes from New England to the Great Lakes.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
We are still about two weeks away from the shortest day of the year, but after Friday night, the early winter sunsets will start shifting later again. The difference between sunset times from Dec. 2 through Dec. 11 is a matter of seconds, all at about 4:43 p.m. in Baltimore. About in the middle of that span is Friday's sunset, after which the darkness starts arriving slightly later each night. The days, however, continue growing shorter until the winter solstice on Dec. 21. Sunrise will continue shifting later in the morning until about Jan. 6, when it peaks at about 7:26 a.m. So, why isn't the earliest sunset and latest sunrise on the winter solstice?
NEWS
By Edith Maynard | December 2, 2012
How the days and months seem to have melted away - melted away from dawns to darkest evenings that arrive earlier each day. We are now approaching "the darkest evening of the year," as one of our favorite American poets, Robert Frost, mentioned at the end of the second stanza of perhaps his most famous poem, "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening. " The winter solstice will arrive on Dec. 21 this year and is the time of the shortest day and longest, and darkest, evening of the year, which marks the beginning of winter.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
Sunshine is in the forecast again today. Enjoy it while it lasts. Tuesday is the last day of the year with more daylight than darkness -- by about 30 seconds. The sun rose at 6:57 a.m. and will set at about 6:58 p.m., for a total of about 12 hours and 30 seconds of daylight.  But the length of daylight is shrinking by about 2 1/2 minutes every day as we move past the autumnal equinox toward the winter solstice. On Wednesday, the sun will rise a minute later and set about two minutes earlier, with daylight for about two minutes shy of 12 hours.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Sun Reporter // Weather Blogger | January 16, 2010
S tacey Dawes writes from Dundalk : " I've noticed that the time of the daily sunrise has been stuck at around 7:25 p.m. since mid-December. I thought we would be gaining some morning sunlight once we passed the winter solstice ." The sun's not stuck. The latest sunrise is Jan. 4, not at the solstice. Baltimore's sunrise advanced from 7:19 a.m. Dec. 15 to 7:27 Jan. 4. Now it's retreating, and we're gaining a few seconds of sunlight each morning. By month's end, we'll be gaining about a minute a day. > Read Frank Roylance's blog on MarylandWeather.
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