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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN ARTS WRITER | February 28, 2002
The question, as it always is, is this: What about the bear? At Baltimore's Center Stage, it gallumphs into view, roaring and huffing, a great, blue manifestation of what must be Shakespeare's most bizarre stage direction. Blue? Yes, blue. "Exit, pursued by a bear," instructed Shakespeare in Act III, Scene 3 of The Winter's Tale. What was the Bard thinking? Did he intend for a real bear - or perhaps a man in a costume - to appear on stage? Should it be scary or amusing? Was the playwright who would become the most revered writer in the English language toying with the directors of his day, or toying with us?
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SPORTS
February 27, 2010
T his year's Winter Olympics in Vancouver have produced their share of drama and pathos, but perhaps no moment more moving than watching Canadian figure skater Joannie Rochette compete after her mother died suddenly last Sunday of a heart attack. The 24-year-old went on to win a bronze medal, an extraordinary and courageous accomplishment given the circumstances. Her transcendent performance and the outpouring of affection from the Canadian audience created a true lump-in-the-throat moment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | June 12, 1997
What better way to usher in summer than with "The Winter's Tale"? Theatre Hopkins' production of Shakespeare's late romance opens at 6: 15 p.m. tomorrow. The first performance will be presented outside Homewood House on the Johns Hopkins University campus, with the facade of the 1801 mansion serving as the setting and William Crowther's Regency period costumes designed to complement the building's neoclassic architecture.Directed by Suzanne Pratt, the tragicomic tale of reconciliation and rebirth features a cast headed by Mark E. Campion as jealous King Leontes.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | April 9, 2008
The Winter's Tale may be the only work by the Bard that focuses on the travails and hard-won joys of an enduring marriage. In more than a dozen other plays, from Romeo and Juliet to Measure for Measure, Shakespeare brilliantly examines the dynamics of erotic longing. But only in this work does he explore the frozen silences that can afflict a long relationship, the arguments as unwinnable as they are bitter. When the hostilities die down and love returns, it can seem more miraculous than the first flush of passion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 17, 2002
So you squeaked by Valentine's Day, and now you think you're free of all that romantic stuff for another year. Not quite, buster. Romance is still in the air. On Friday, Center Stage begins performances of one of Shakespeare's late romances, The Winter's Tale. And today, Arena Stage in Washington wraps up the run of John Glore's modern romance, On the Jump. These aren't romances of the hearts-and-flowers variety. In dramatic literature, romances have certain traits that transcend Harlequin paperbacks.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | April 9, 2008
The Winter's Tale may be the only work by the Bard that focuses on the travails and hard-won joys of an enduring marriage. In more than a dozen other plays, from Romeo and Juliet to Measure for Measure, Shakespeare brilliantly examines the dynamics of erotic longing. But only in this work does he explore the frozen silences that can afflict a long relationship, the arguments as unwinnable as they are bitter. When the hostilities die down and love returns, it can seem more miraculous than the first flush of passion.
NEWS
April 6, 2008
MUSIC KEITH URBAN AND CARRIE UNDERWOOD / / 7:30 p.m., Wednesday. 1st Mariner Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St. $43-$73. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com ....................... This is definitely a picture-perfect tour, headlined by two of country music's most beautiful people. And beyond the stylish gear and great hair, Urban and Underwood are talented artists, imbuing country with accessible pop textures. It also doesn't hurt that each has sold truckloads of albums. ....................
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2002
After Sept. 11, a great many people were so sad we thought we never would smile again. And yet, during the past year, most of us have found some reason for joy: the birth of a child, the discovery of a new friend or even a garden coaxed into bloom. Life goes on, with its ever-varying mixture of rapture and heartbreak, which, bewilderingly, often exist at the same moment. This is the great lesson of The Winter's Tale. And the great accomplishment of the Shakespeare Theatre production directed by Michael Kahn is that it respects the play's splendid, jarring shifts of emotion without trying to reconcile or make sense of them.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | February 23, 1993
Midway through through last night's performance by soprano Phyllis Bryn-Julson and pianist Mark Markham of Charles Wuorinen's "A Winter's Tale," several members of the audience turned a page of the program. It was only then that at least one listener at this Chamber Music Society of Baltimore concert in the Baltimore Museum of Art remembered that there was a text. That's how dramatic a setting of Dylan Thomas' great poem Wuorinen has constructed, and how flawlessly (and with what perfect diction)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 5, 2001
A classic Broadway musical and plays by William Shakespeare, Noel Coward and Lorraine Hansberry will highlight the 2001-2002 Center Stage season. The musical, "The Pajama Game," will be only the second major Broadway musical produced by Center Stage in its 38-year history. (The first was "She Loves Me" in 1985.) The 1954 show about a strike at a pajama factory will be staged by artistic director Irene Lewis, who described it as a "quintessential musical." "It's sheer fun. It has a little bit of anchoring with the love story and with the union, but for the most part, it's light," Lewis said.
NEWS
April 6, 2008
MUSIC KEITH URBAN AND CARRIE UNDERWOOD / / 7:30 p.m., Wednesday. 1st Mariner Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St. $43-$73. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com ....................... This is definitely a picture-perfect tour, headlined by two of country music's most beautiful people. And beyond the stylish gear and great hair, Urban and Underwood are talented artists, imbuing country with accessible pop textures. It also doesn't hurt that each has sold truckloads of albums. ....................
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2002
After Sept. 11, a great many people were so sad we thought we never would smile again. And yet, during the past year, most of us have found some reason for joy: the birth of a child, the discovery of a new friend or even a garden coaxed into bloom. Life goes on, with its ever-varying mixture of rapture and heartbreak, which, bewilderingly, often exist at the same moment. This is the great lesson of The Winter's Tale. And the great accomplishment of the Shakespeare Theatre production directed by Michael Kahn is that it respects the play's splendid, jarring shifts of emotion without trying to reconcile or make sense of them.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN ARTS WRITER | February 28, 2002
The question, as it always is, is this: What about the bear? At Baltimore's Center Stage, it gallumphs into view, roaring and huffing, a great, blue manifestation of what must be Shakespeare's most bizarre stage direction. Blue? Yes, blue. "Exit, pursued by a bear," instructed Shakespeare in Act III, Scene 3 of The Winter's Tale. What was the Bard thinking? Did he intend for a real bear - or perhaps a man in a costume - to appear on stage? Should it be scary or amusing? Was the playwright who would become the most revered writer in the English language toying with the directors of his day, or toying with us?
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 17, 2002
So you squeaked by Valentine's Day, and now you think you're free of all that romantic stuff for another year. Not quite, buster. Romance is still in the air. On Friday, Center Stage begins performances of one of Shakespeare's late romances, The Winter's Tale. And today, Arena Stage in Washington wraps up the run of John Glore's modern romance, On the Jump. These aren't romances of the hearts-and-flowers variety. In dramatic literature, romances have certain traits that transcend Harlequin paperbacks.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 5, 2001
A classic Broadway musical and plays by William Shakespeare, Noel Coward and Lorraine Hansberry will highlight the 2001-2002 Center Stage season. The musical, "The Pajama Game," will be only the second major Broadway musical produced by Center Stage in its 38-year history. (The first was "She Loves Me" in 1985.) The 1954 show about a strike at a pajama factory will be staged by artistic director Irene Lewis, who described it as a "quintessential musical." "It's sheer fun. It has a little bit of anchoring with the love story and with the union, but for the most part, it's light," Lewis said.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 24, 1997
Shakespeare's "The Winter's Tale" is a lot like a fairy-tale. Evil forces appear out of nowhere, the innocent are punished, and danger lurks in the woods, but in the end, love conquers all and everyone lives happily ever after.Seeing Theatre Hopkins' production in the verdant setting of the terraced upper gardens at Evergreen House only adds to the play's magical sense of rebirth and reconciliation.Granted, you have to look long and hard to find winter when the greenery is in full bloom and the temperature hovers around 90. So perhaps it's wise that director Suzanne Pratt makes no effort to pretend Baltimore's typical hot-hazy-and-humid summer clime is actually wintry Sicilia, where the first three acts take place.
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