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SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | February 11, 2009
LAKE PLACID, N.Y. - With one year to go before the caldron is lighted, it's gut-check time for those whose lives are intertwined with the five Olympic rings. The host city of Vancouver and the athletes and their coaches have covered a lot of ground to get ready for the XXI Winter Games, but hurdles remain before the opening ceremony next Feb. 12. Not surprisingly, many challenges are tied to the economy: * Sponsorships are down. * The Vancouver organizing committee has shaved millions from its budget and dipped into its contingency fund.
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SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 23, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- You had to be here.You had to be inside an Olympic stadium during closing ceremonies filled with joy and tears, as taiko drummers gave way to a stagecoach from Salt Lake City and an Olympic caldron that burned fierce and bright for 16 days was doused on a cloudless night.You had to search for winter, traveling two hours into the mountains, dealing with snow, sleet and rain before discovering Hermann Maier, the ex-bricklayer from Austria, somersaulting through the air in perhaps the most spectacular skiing crash in Olympic history.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2002
SALT LAKE CITY - George Steinbrenner and meddling used to go hand in hand. Now, it's Steinbrenner and medaling. At the halfway point in the Winter Games, the U.S. team has exceeded projections set by the U.S. Olympic Committee for the entire 16 days of competition. Americans have 16 medals - three gold, seven silver and six bronze. Give some credit to Steinbrenner and a rock-bottom finish at the Winter Games in Calgary in 1988, where the United States won just six medals, two of them gold, to begin the turnaround.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2002
Donald M. Wallace woke up yesterday morning confident that it was the first day of his Olympic training. He pulled on a pair of jeans and a red fleece shirt, and set his leather cowboy hat just so on his head. Slipping a flask of scotch in his pocket, he headed out to the slick new National Capital Curling Center in Laurel. His pronouncement was definitive after an hour on the ice: "I'm going to be in the Olympics. I'm Scottish, and curling is in my blood, so this feels like the culmination of millions of years of evolution.
SPORTS
By Sharon Robb and Sharon Robb,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | February 7, 1992
The thought of Americans at the top of the mountain at the XVI Winter Olympics is heady and strange. Still, Americans may have more to cheer about than ever before.The sweeping political thawing in Eastern Europe and elimination of its government-aided sports programs, coupled with the U.S. Olympic Committee's increased financial support of its winter sports, may result in a U.S. record medal count in Albertville, France."I want to be able to leave here saying we came, we saw, we conquered," said Alpine skier AJ Kitt, the first American to win a World Cup race since 1984.
SPORTS
February 15, 2006
A Brazilian bobsledder who tested positive for steroids in a pre-Olympic drug test became the first athlete sent home from the Turin Games for doping. Armando dos Santos failed the test in early January when a sample showed evidence of the steroid nandrolone, according to a statement posted on the Brazilian Olympic Committee's Web site. Dos Santos, a former hammer thrower, will be replaced on the four-man team by Claudinei Quirino - a silver medalist in the 400-meter relay at the 2000 Sydney Olympics.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | February 13, 2006
CESANA PARIOL, Italy -- Hometown boy made good. In the biting mountain cold, Armin Zoeggeler, the reigning Olympic luge champion, warmed Italian hearts last night, winning his country's first gold medal of these Winter Games. As a raucous partisan crowd cheered, rang bells and danced, Zoeggeler held off Russia's Albert Demtschenko, winning all four races with a combined time of 3 minutes, 26.088 seconds. "I still don't believe that I won the medal," said Zoeggeler, who also has silver and bronze Olympic medals.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 15, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- Todd Eldredge began this journey as a kid in hockey skates on Cape Cod in Massachusetts. He liked to spin and jump, and soon, he followed a coach and a dream across America.He followed his coach, Richard Callaghan, through rinks in Philadelphia, San Diego, Colorado Springs, Colo., and Detroit. He rehearsed two decades for this one moment that was supposed to end in gold.Instead, Eldredge finished the 1998 Winter Olympics in failure yesterday. He was fourth in the men's figure skating final and he was out of the medals.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2002
SALT LAKE CITY - On these quiet, tree-lined streets just south of the University of Utah's campus, the world's races, religions, friends and foes got reacquainted last night. The backdrop, of course, was the opening ceremony of the 2002 Winter Olympics, an event that finally arrived in this city after seven years of planning and billions of dollars of spending. But unlike the polite party inside Rice-Eccles Olympic Stadium that was broadcast around the world, with its fancy lighting and Bob Costas voice-overs, the streets outside were full of unscripted emotion, as thousands from around the world traded pins, patriotism and prejudice.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 6, 1998
NAGANO, Japan - Beneath a cypress-roofed Buddhist temple named Zenkoji, pilgrims fumble through a dark passageway, seeking the "Key to Paradise."Those who overcome the underground chill and ages-old fear reach out, touch the padlock and gain eternal salvation.For Japan, the "Key to Paradise" contained in the great temple that looms over this remote, industrial city serves as a symbol of the promise and the peril that is the 1998 Winter Olympics.The promise is that Nagano will connect with the world.
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