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Winter Holidays

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NEWS
November 19, 2006
Holiday outings -- Waiting for Santa to appear at the end of the Christmas parade, shopping for the perfect Christmas tree or gathering the family together for the lighting of the menorah. We want to hear about the traditions you and your family keep on the weekends leading to the winter holidays. If you have a favorite place or activity, let us know. Write to Liz Atwood, features department, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St. 21278 or send e-mail to sun.features@baltsun.com by Dec. 1. Please put "Holiday Plans" in the subject line.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | December 29, 2011
Holiday parties are just a fancy cover, and traditional family dinners are simply an excuse. The truth is, all we want to do at this time of year is … eat. Winter days are shorter and colder, and the sunlight is weak. So is our will, and nothing fills that hole in the psyche like mom's meatloaf and scalloped potatoes. Or a slab of lasagna the size of a brick. Or a serving of spaghetti that would fill a garbage can lid. Carbs and home cookin' are feel-good foods. They either trigger the release of the feel-good hormone serotonin in the brain or they can bring back memories of happier times, when life was less complicated or sad. That's one explanation anyway.
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FEATURES
December 3, 2005
Is there any time of year when we don't decorate to excess any more? From Valentine's Day to Easter to the Fourth of July to Halloween and Thanksgiving, lights, inflatable objects and other ornaments now appear in yards, malls and public spaces everywhere. By the time the Christmas season rolls around, it's possible to suffer from decoration fatigue. Still, displays the rest of the year pale in comparison to the sort you see during the winter holidays. Maybe it's because the December landscape is so dark and barren otherwise.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2010
Happy holidays? Not always. Not when you're forced to spend a few days cooped up inside with family members you may not get along with all that well, getting presents you don't need and giving away presents you spent too much money on. Maybe, you start thinking to yourself, Ebenezer Scrooge had the right idea. "People who seldom or never see one another during the year are thrown together in close proximity at family reunions during the winter holidays," says Johns Hopkins University Professor P.M. Forni, author of "The Civility Solution: What to Do When People are Rude," who teaches the history and theory of good manners.
NEWS
By SALLY BUCKLER | December 17, 1992
A wise man once said that this is the time of year for --ing through the dough. Do you think he was talking about the green stuff or the cookie stuff?Happy Hanukkah! At holiday times we think of good friends and warm memories. One summer day, my son and I met some dear friends at the airport. They were returning from a trip to Israel, a trip that was a dream come true for this couple and their two teen-age sons. My friend Gale was very excited about an unusual hand crafted menorah they'd bought on their trip.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2010
Happy holidays? Not always. Not when you're forced to spend a few days cooped up inside with family members you may not get along with all that well, getting presents you don't need and giving away presents you spent too much money on. Maybe, you start thinking to yourself, Ebenezer Scrooge had the right idea. "People who seldom or never see one another during the year are thrown together in close proximity at family reunions during the winter holidays," says Johns Hopkins University Professor P.M. Forni, author of "The Civility Solution: What to Do When People are Rude," who teaches the history and theory of good manners.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | March 15, 1993
Carroll County's unemployment rate rose to 7.6 percent in January, a result of layoffs and plant closings that always happen after the winter holidays, Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development officials said Friday.The number of Carroll County people receiving unemployment insurance rose from 3,898 in December to 4,912 in January.However, DEED officials said they are reluctant to compare that number to December's 6.0 percent unemployment rate because year-end population adjustments are not complete.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | December 15, 1992
Washington. -- As surely as Christmas comes every year, so do the efforts by a tiny minority to keep many people from exercising their religious and free speech rights.Following last summer's Supreme Court ruling in Lee vs. Weisman, which banned references to God at public school commencement ceremonies, some school districts have begun helping the court finish the spiritual genocide it began more than four decades ago.The superintendent of Frederick County, Virginia, public schools, Thomas Malcolm, is speeding up the process.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | December 29, 2011
Holiday parties are just a fancy cover, and traditional family dinners are simply an excuse. The truth is, all we want to do at this time of year is … eat. Winter days are shorter and colder, and the sunlight is weak. So is our will, and nothing fills that hole in the psyche like mom's meatloaf and scalloped potatoes. Or a slab of lasagna the size of a brick. Or a serving of spaghetti that would fill a garbage can lid. Carbs and home cookin' are feel-good foods. They either trigger the release of the feel-good hormone serotonin in the brain or they can bring back memories of happier times, when life was less complicated or sad. That's one explanation anyway.
FEATURES
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 1998
This time of year, I long to dive into a Currier and Ives print to escape the commercial clatter of the holidays. But a visit to an herb farm runs a close second in restorative benefit. Most herb farms offer not only fresh potted herbs and herbal gifts, but also classes, seminars and events to celebrate the season. Here's a sampling:An Eastridge Garden in rural Centreville sells tropical plants, herbs, herbal gifts, trees and shrubs. Proprietor Sally Foster's rosemary and ivy topiaries share space in five greenhouses with potted herb gardens and living herbal wreaths, elegant centerpieces that also add flavor to holiday meals.
NEWS
November 19, 2006
Holiday outings -- Waiting for Santa to appear at the end of the Christmas parade, shopping for the perfect Christmas tree or gathering the family together for the lighting of the menorah. We want to hear about the traditions you and your family keep on the weekends leading to the winter holidays. If you have a favorite place or activity, let us know. Write to Liz Atwood, features department, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St. 21278 or send e-mail to sun.features@baltsun.com by Dec. 1. Please put "Holiday Plans" in the subject line.
FEATURES
December 3, 2005
Is there any time of year when we don't decorate to excess any more? From Valentine's Day to Easter to the Fourth of July to Halloween and Thanksgiving, lights, inflatable objects and other ornaments now appear in yards, malls and public spaces everywhere. By the time the Christmas season rolls around, it's possible to suffer from decoration fatigue. Still, displays the rest of the year pale in comparison to the sort you see during the winter holidays. Maybe it's because the December landscape is so dark and barren otherwise.
NEWS
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,Special to the Sun | December 24, 2000
Long before there was a Christmas, evergreens were used to honor and entice the powerful and mystic forces that would bring forth warmth and life in the new year. The Romans adorned their homes with evergreens at the winter solstice during the riotous festival of Saturnalia, named for Saturnus, the god of agriculture. The custom spread as they colonized new lands. In northern Europe and Scandinavia, where Christmas was not firmly established until the 12th century, fir and pine branches and trees were chosen as emblems of the woods and their attendant gods.
FEATURES
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 1998
This time of year, I long to dive into a Currier and Ives print to escape the commercial clatter of the holidays. But a visit to an herb farm runs a close second in restorative benefit. Most herb farms offer not only fresh potted herbs and herbal gifts, but also classes, seminars and events to celebrate the season. Here's a sampling:An Eastridge Garden in rural Centreville sells tropical plants, herbs, herbal gifts, trees and shrubs. Proprietor Sally Foster's rosemary and ivy topiaries share space in five greenhouses with potted herb gardens and living herbal wreaths, elegant centerpieces that also add flavor to holiday meals.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | March 15, 1993
Carroll County's unemployment rate rose to 7.6 percent in January, a result of layoffs and plant closings that always happen after the winter holidays, Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development officials said Friday.The number of Carroll County people receiving unemployment insurance rose from 3,898 in December to 4,912 in January.However, DEED officials said they are reluctant to compare that number to December's 6.0 percent unemployment rate because year-end population adjustments are not complete.
NEWS
By SALLY BUCKLER | December 17, 1992
A wise man once said that this is the time of year for --ing through the dough. Do you think he was talking about the green stuff or the cookie stuff?Happy Hanukkah! At holiday times we think of good friends and warm memories. One summer day, my son and I met some dear friends at the airport. They were returning from a trip to Israel, a trip that was a dream come true for this couple and their two teen-age sons. My friend Gale was very excited about an unusual hand crafted menorah they'd bought on their trip.
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