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Winter Garden

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NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 2002
PUPILS AT Linton Springs Elementary School participated recently in the creation of a winter garden. The Sykesville school's winter garden was designed to be a safe environment for wildlife, with plants to provide food and shelter. Parent volunteers, teachers and pupils of all grade levels were enthusiastic about the project, which was directed by Pam Sherfey's fourth-grade class. The class began working on the project in January and completed every phase, from research and planning to planting and mulching, Sherfey said.
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FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
Gardeners attack the spring with energy and enthusiasm, adding lots of color, bulbs, perennials, flowering trees and shrubs. We wilt in the summer heat, and by fall we barely have the spirit for a pot of mums. Winter, we think, is for catalogs by the fire. It's also when you stop working in the garden and just think about it. Not so for Christine Killian of Annapolis and Alice Ryan of Easton. Both gardeners have made it a point to create winter interest in their gardens, if for no other reason than they want something lovely to look at from the warmth of the house.
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BUSINESS
By Susan Reimer and The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
When Southern Living magazine asked Baltimore botanical artist Meg Page to create dinnerware that can bridge the fall and winter entertaining seasons, she asked them to send her clippings from branches in their own backyards so she could get it right. Page then arranged the nandina, boxwood, holly and mistletoe on the edges of white china, as she would a natural garnish, and began to create. The result: dinnerware and serving pieces that have the same effect "as you would have if you ran out and clipped some holly for your cheese plate," said Page.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
I saved my poinsettia from last year and it grew happily all summer. I put it in a closet two months ago to make it bloom red again for the holidays, but it is turning yellow instead. What should I do? Poinsettias need bright indirect light to survive. Here's how to get them ready for the holidays: Since poinsettias initiate flowers as days get shorter, any additional light from artificial sources will prevent flower development. To get color for the holidays, give plants no more than 10 hours of daylight and then place them in at least 14 hours of darkness each day. This can be done by placing plants under a box or in a closet each evening from 5 p.m. to 7 a.m. for about two months, generally October and November, so they are ready in December.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff | December 5, 2004
Every year it begins with a knock on the door, followed by a long moment of anticipation. When the teacher finally nods, the children enter a familiar room transformed by darkness. With the windows covered, the only light in the movement arts studio flickers from a few candles. One by one, the students file past a freshly constructed winter garden, a spiraling path of greenery that leads to a place of light guarded by a quiet angel from the eighth grade -- another piece of magic. Along the way, the children hear the tinkling voices of glockenspiels, sounds that summon old melodies and simpler times.
NEWS
August 31, 2002
Dorothy M.W. Krolicki, a retired seamstress and former Severna Park resident, died of pneumonia Aug. 23 in Ocoee, Fla. She was 90. Born Dorothy M. Wojciechowski in Baltimore, she left school early to help support her family and was a cannery worker in the 1920s. For many years, she was a seamstress in Baltimore's garment district near Lombard and Paca streets. She retired in 1983 and moved from Severna Park to Winter Garden, Fla., in 1997. She was a watercolorist and accomplished needleworker.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
Gardeners attack the spring with energy and enthusiasm, adding lots of color, bulbs, perennials, flowering trees and shrubs. We wilt in the summer heat, and by fall we barely have the spirit for a pot of mums. Winter, we think, is for catalogs by the fire. It's also when you stop working in the garden and just think about it. Not so for Christine Killian of Annapolis and Alice Ryan of Easton. Both gardeners have made it a point to create winter interest in their gardens, if for no other reason than they want something lovely to look at from the warmth of the house.
FEATURES
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 1998
It doesn't occur to people very often, but winter can be a great time to enjoy a garden.There is no grass to mow, for one thing, which recommends itself highly to me to begin with. Or weeds to pull, except for the most paltry sorts, and actually this is rather nice, too. It gives one such a virtuous feeling to pry out a few infant yellow dock (rumex) weeds.Of course, not very long ago, my garden might as well have been dead in the winter. But was it rewarding to amble about in on a December, January or February day?
NEWS
By Miriam Mahowald and Miriam Mahowald,Contributing writer | November 11, 1990
ROLL BACK THOSE WINTER BLUES WITH AN 'EDIBLE LANDSCAPE' COLORFUL VEGETABLES OFFER WELCOME HARVEST BALTIMORE SUN (BS) - Sunday, November 11, 1990 By: Miriam Mahowald Contributing writer Edition: Final Section: Howard Page: 22 Word Count: 879 MEMO: COLUMN: Green Piece TEXT: Deceptively warm September and October days lured gardeners into thinking that this year the cold weather might arrive late.But fall usually sneaks up on us, so that one calm night frost crystals cover the lawn and tender foliage turns black.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
I saved my poinsettia from last year and it grew happily all summer. I put it in a closet two months ago to make it bloom red again for the holidays, but it is turning yellow instead. What should I do? Poinsettias need bright indirect light to survive. Here's how to get them ready for the holidays: Since poinsettias initiate flowers as days get shorter, any additional light from artificial sources will prevent flower development. To get color for the holidays, give plants no more than 10 hours of daylight and then place them in at least 14 hours of darkness each day. This can be done by placing plants under a box or in a closet each evening from 5 p.m. to 7 a.m. for about two months, generally October and November, so they are ready in December.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | April 22, 2013
It was Dirty Finger Club Day at Linton Springs Elementary School, near Eldersburg. Out in the vegetable garden - one of a dozen "outdoor classrooms" in the meadows, wetlands and woodlands of school's spacious grounds - Anna Letaw, a volunteer who has been the dynamo behind Linton Springs' Environmental Education Program, was giving a kindergarten class a primer on gardening. "Oh, look what I found!" Letaw called out as she knelt. "An earthworm .... Can anybody tell me what earthworms do?"
BUSINESS
By Susan Reimer and The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
When Southern Living magazine asked Baltimore botanical artist Meg Page to create dinnerware that can bridge the fall and winter entertaining seasons, she asked them to send her clippings from branches in their own backyards so she could get it right. Page then arranged the nandina, boxwood, holly and mistletoe on the edges of white china, as she would a natural garnish, and began to create. The result: dinnerware and serving pieces that have the same effect "as you would have if you ran out and clipped some holly for your cheese plate," said Page.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer , susan.reimer@baltsun.com | December 10, 2009
Don't let the cold weather fool you. Gardeners are always gardening, even if only in their daydreams, and that makes holiday gift-giving easy. Here's my list, and I'm checking it twice. Friends and family members? Take notice. Gloves. Garden gloves are like socks: You are always missing one. They don't make for a lavish gift, but they will be much appreciated. While you are at it, give a couple of pairs. (westcountygardener.com or 800-475-0567) Felco pruners or a soil knife.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff | December 5, 2004
Every year it begins with a knock on the door, followed by a long moment of anticipation. When the teacher finally nods, the children enter a familiar room transformed by darkness. With the windows covered, the only light in the movement arts studio flickers from a few candles. One by one, the students file past a freshly constructed winter garden, a spiraling path of greenery that leads to a place of light guarded by a quiet angel from the eighth grade -- another piece of magic. Along the way, the children hear the tinkling voices of glockenspiels, sounds that summon old melodies and simpler times.
NEWS
By Glenn Collins and Glenn Collins,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 29, 2002
NEW YORK - On a crisp morning strikingly reminiscent of that other day in September - the identical azure sky and astonishingly brilliant sun - the doors of the Winter Garden recently opened to the public after being closed for more than a year. For many, it was like coming home. "It's beautiful to see it back again," said Dick Allerton, who had traveled from the Upper West Side with his wife to stand again in the public centerpiece of the World Financial Center. It underwent a $50 million reconstruction after it was severely damaged in the collapse of the World Trade Center.
NEWS
August 31, 2002
Dorothy M.W. Krolicki, a retired seamstress and former Severna Park resident, died of pneumonia Aug. 23 in Ocoee, Fla. She was 90. Born Dorothy M. Wojciechowski in Baltimore, she left school early to help support her family and was a cannery worker in the 1920s. For many years, she was a seamstress in Baltimore's garment district near Lombard and Paca streets. She retired in 1983 and moved from Severna Park to Winter Garden, Fla., in 1997. She was a watercolorist and accomplished needleworker.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | April 22, 2013
It was Dirty Finger Club Day at Linton Springs Elementary School, near Eldersburg. Out in the vegetable garden - one of a dozen "outdoor classrooms" in the meadows, wetlands and woodlands of school's spacious grounds - Anna Letaw, a volunteer who has been the dynamo behind Linton Springs' Environmental Education Program, was giving a kindergarten class a primer on gardening. "Oh, look what I found!" Letaw called out as she knelt. "An earthworm .... Can anybody tell me what earthworms do?"
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | December 6, 1992
As the holidays near, I prepare to gather Christmas greens.Let others deck the halls with boughs of holly. The greens of my dreams will be piled on my plate beneath an avalanche of French dressing. It's salad greens that I crave, garden-fresh vegetables to celebrate the carving of Big Bird at Christmas.My greens should be ready to harvest by then.Forget plummeting temperatures -- the spinach is thriving in the back yard. Despite howling winds, I sleep undisturbed as visions of lettuce leaves dance in my head.
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 2002
PUPILS AT Linton Springs Elementary School participated recently in the creation of a winter garden. The Sykesville school's winter garden was designed to be a safe environment for wildlife, with plants to provide food and shelter. Parent volunteers, teachers and pupils of all grade levels were enthusiastic about the project, which was directed by Pam Sherfey's fourth-grade class. The class began working on the project in January and completed every phase, from research and planning to planting and mulching, Sherfey said.
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