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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 22, 1995
Winslow Homer stands at the summit of American art, as the National Gallery's grand new show of his work once again proves. In his own time a century ago, he was recognized as one of the greatest American artists -- and so he is recognized today.His work has many faces: Civil War battlefront scenes, postwar genre paintings, watercolors from the tropics, environmental protest images, grandly heroic and tragic sea paintings. Among all these, there are greater and lesser individual works, but he was always an artist of uncommon depth.
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By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | February 4, 2007
Late in 2005, retired Rouse Co. CEO Anthony W. Deering and his wife, Lynn, donated half-interest in a Winslow Homer painting to the Baltimore Museum of Art. But the 1873 oil - Young Man Reading - has spent only a month at the museum and wasn't on display. That's fine with the BMA, which says it must prepare a proper exhibition before showing the piece and will inherit the whole thing anyway when the Deerings die, at the latest. But this kind of thing really hacks off Iowa Sen. Charles E. Grassley, and he has a point.
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By Chuck Myers and Chuck Myers,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | August 11, 2005
A young man lying flat in his canoe locks a firm grip onto the antler of a deer, which barely has its head above the water's surface. Nearby, a hound dog paddles toward the boat. The action in the scene appears to suggest an attempt to save the deer's life -- or kill it. Neither possibility, however, bears out. In fact, American artist Winslow Homer (1836-1910) had another interpretation in mind when he captured the moment in his celebrated painting Hound and Hunter (1892). Hound and Hunter provides a vivid, if not unsettling, narrative view about wilderness life in late 19th-century America.
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By Chuck Myers and Chuck Myers,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | August 11, 2005
A young man lying flat in his canoe locks a firm grip onto the antler of a deer, which barely has its head above the water's surface. Nearby, a hound dog paddles toward the boat. The action in the scene appears to suggest an attempt to save the deer's life -- or kill it. Neither possibility, however, bears out. In fact, American artist Winslow Homer (1836-1910) had another interpretation in mind when he captured the moment in his celebrated painting Hound and Hunter (1892). Hound and Hunter provides a vivid, if not unsettling, narrative view about wilderness life in late 19th-century America.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | March 31, 1991
A characteristic Winslow Homer painting of the 1890s -- for instance, "High Cliff, Coast of Maine" or "Weatherbeaten" (both 1894) -- will have some dark rocks at the bottom, perhaps rising in a diagonal across the canvas, breakers with white foam in the middle and a green-gray sea blending into a dull gray sky at the top. Nothing more.So why is it so moving? Because it is not about the rocks and the water, it is not about composition and color, it is not about realism and abstraction. It is about the splendid isolation of the human soul.
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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 2001
Artists have been on intimate terms with nature since the earliest drawings of prehistoric animals went up on the walls of caves. Since then, artists of every generation have continued to explore the natural world and its connection to the expressive soul. The late 19th and early 20th centuries were no exception to this trend, which is the point of "American Landscapes from the Paine Art Center and Gardens," an exhibit of 48 landscape paintings and prints that will be on display at St. John's College's Mitchell Gallery in Annapolis from Tuesday through Feb. 23. These works, by such luminaries as James McNeill Whistler, George Inness, Winslow Homer and Grant Wood, offer varying moods and takes on the ever-changing connection between the natural world and the artists who study it so intensely to capture its aesthetic messages.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 2001
Artists have been on intimate terms with nature since the earliest drawings of prehistoric animals went up on the walls of caves. Since then, artists of every generation have continued to explore the natural world and its connection to the expressive soul. The late 19th and early 20th centuries were no exception to this trend, which is the point of "American Landscapes from the Paine Art Center and Gardens," an exhibit of 48 paintings and prints that will be on display at St. John's College's Mitchell Gallery in Annapolis from Tuesday through Feb. 23. These works, by such luminaries as James McNeill Whistler, George Inness, Winslow Homer and Grant Wood, offer varying moods and takes on the ever-changing connection between the natural world and the artists who study it so intensely to capture its aesthetic messages.
NEWS
By Amy Littlesugar | April 18, 1999
Editor's note: The remarkable story of artist Winslow Homer's visit to Petersburg, Va., and the painting it inspired, "Dressing for the Carnival."The time that the Yankee artist Winslow Homer came to stay at my mama's hotel, it was near the Fourth of July and hot enough to still the cottonmouths in the creek.So hot, the gardens and orchards were explodin' with squash, okra, and peaches that summer in 1876.One night, after I was supposed to be in bed, some of Mama's guests sat rockin' on the porch.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | February 4, 2007
Late in 2005, retired Rouse Co. CEO Anthony W. Deering and his wife, Lynn, donated half-interest in a Winslow Homer painting to the Baltimore Museum of Art. But the 1873 oil - Young Man Reading - has spent only a month at the museum and wasn't on display. That's fine with the BMA, which says it must prepare a proper exhibition before showing the piece and will inherit the whole thing anyway when the Deerings die, at the latest. But this kind of thing really hacks off Iowa Sen. Charles E. Grassley, and he has a point.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 29, 2007
On violent, storm-tossed waters, two men in a tiny wooden fishing vessel struggle desperately to bring in their catch under ominously lowering skies. It's a scene that New England landscape artist Winslow Homer might well have painted from his isolated studio on Maine's rocky coast -- a dramatic evocation of man's unending struggle against the implacable forces of nature and a capricious fate. BLACK MASTERS / / Through May 27 / / Katzen Arts Center, American University, Washington / / 202-885-2787 or american.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 2001
Artists have been on intimate terms with nature since the earliest drawings of prehistoric animals went up on the walls of caves. Since then, artists of every generation have continued to explore the natural world and its connection to the expressive soul. The late 19th and early 20th centuries were no exception to this trend, which is the point of "American Landscapes from the Paine Art Center and Gardens," an exhibit of 48 landscape paintings and prints that will be on display at St. John's College's Mitchell Gallery in Annapolis from Tuesday through Feb. 23. These works, by such luminaries as James McNeill Whistler, George Inness, Winslow Homer and Grant Wood, offer varying moods and takes on the ever-changing connection between the natural world and the artists who study it so intensely to capture its aesthetic messages.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 2001
Artists have been on intimate terms with nature since the earliest drawings of prehistoric animals went up on the walls of caves. Since then, artists of every generation have continued to explore the natural world and its connection to the expressive soul. The late 19th and early 20th centuries were no exception to this trend, which is the point of "American Landscapes from the Paine Art Center and Gardens," an exhibit of 48 paintings and prints that will be on display at St. John's College's Mitchell Gallery in Annapolis from Tuesday through Feb. 23. These works, by such luminaries as James McNeill Whistler, George Inness, Winslow Homer and Grant Wood, offer varying moods and takes on the ever-changing connection between the natural world and the artists who study it so intensely to capture its aesthetic messages.
NEWS
By Amy Littlesugar | April 18, 1999
Editor's note: The remarkable story of artist Winslow Homer's visit to Petersburg, Va., and the painting it inspired, "Dressing for the Carnival."The time that the Yankee artist Winslow Homer came to stay at my mama's hotel, it was near the Fourth of July and hot enough to still the cottonmouths in the creek.So hot, the gardens and orchards were explodin' with squash, okra, and peaches that summer in 1876.One night, after I was supposed to be in bed, some of Mama's guests sat rockin' on the porch.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 22, 1995
Winslow Homer stands at the summit of American art, as the National Gallery's grand new show of his work once again proves. In his own time a century ago, he was recognized as one of the greatest American artists -- and so he is recognized today.His work has many faces: Civil War battlefront scenes, postwar genre paintings, watercolors from the tropics, environmental protest images, grandly heroic and tragic sea paintings. Among all these, there are greater and lesser individual works, but he was always an artist of uncommon depth.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | March 31, 1991
A characteristic Winslow Homer painting of the 1890s -- for instance, "High Cliff, Coast of Maine" or "Weatherbeaten" (both 1894) -- will have some dark rocks at the bottom, perhaps rising in a diagonal across the canvas, breakers with white foam in the middle and a green-gray sea blending into a dull gray sky at the top. Nothing more.So why is it so moving? Because it is not about the rocks and the water, it is not about composition and color, it is not about realism and abstraction. It is about the splendid isolation of the human soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | April 3, 1997
The Baltimore Museum of Art's print and drawing collection is best known for its French 19th century works. Its collection of American 19th century works is much smaller but includes some choice names. Next Wednesday, the museum will open "BMA Collects: Nineteenth-Century American Drawings and Watercolors," a selection from the BMA's holdings. It will feature such works as Thomas Eakins' portrait of his father-in-law (about 1891), four watercolors by Winslow Homer dating from the 1880s and 1890s and two pastel drawings from the 1890s by Mary Cassatt, as well as works by Benjamin West, John Singer Sargent and Nicolino Calyo.
TRAVEL
By MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN | January 4, 2009
Experts predict 2009 will be the year of the travel deal. With fewer people able to afford a vacation, hotels, airlines, cruise lines and tour operators will offer deep discounts to lure travelers. According to CheapTickets.com's 2009 Value Travel Forecast, one of the destinations expected to offer the most value to travelers is Portland, Maine. Visitors to this city along Maine's southern coast can save 53 percent off peak rates when traveling during early spring. From Baltimore, AirTran offers nonstop flights to Portland for as little as $56 each way. Here are five things to do in Portland: 1 Sightsee by ferry.
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