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By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2005
THEIR REPUTATIONS couldn't have been more different. One was a brash Boy Wonder with the proclivity to trade his own mother if it meant filling a middle-infield void. The other was an old-school loyalist with a reputed disdain for any modern ballplayer who couldn't match his work ethic and God-given talent, which meant about 99 percent of all major leaguers. That was a decade and several jobs ago. Now, Washington Nationals manager Frank Robinson, who turns 70 in August, is more relaxed, more accepting, more grandfatherly.
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NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | October 25, 2012
Not everybody is watching football games on Sunday afternoon. Thank goodness that's the case for the classical music series Sundays at Three, which, true to its name, stands a sporting chance of attracting a nonsporting audience for its season-opening concert on Sunday, Oct. 28 at 3 p.m. at Christ Episcopal Church, in Columbia. The three performers on this concert are Bo Li, who is acting assistant principal cellist with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra; Kuei-l Wu, who teaches piano at Howard Community College; and violinist Ronald Mutchnik, who is artistic director of the Sundays at Three series.
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NEWS
September 1, 2004
Sen. Zell Miller, Democrat Georgia "I never dreamed that the (Democratic) party was as far left as it is until I went to Washington." Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa "There's a very distinct difference between the two candidates and somebody needs to express it, and I wish the president could express it more." Filmmaker Michael Moore "I now know what th Christians probably felt like walking into the Coliseum." Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina "The winning combination is Republicans who can sell conservative philosophy to a wider audience, showing acceptance to moderates."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2012
Up until the ninth inning, it was a great game, and TBS provided coverage worthy of it. As I said in my review of Friday night's wildcard game, the broadcast team of Ernie Johnson on play by play and Cal Ripken and John Smoltz as analysts is a winner. Johnson's easygoing style creates a solid and steady baseline that allows Ripken and Smoltz to concentrate on taking viewers inside the game. Smoltz was especially sharp Sunday in explaining how C.C. Sabathia managed to keep the Orioles off balance at the plate all night.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | June 12, 2008
Despite its high-visibility location in a Howard County village center, across from the Columbia Gym, the spot occupied by the River Hill Sports Grille has seen several restaurants come and go, including Bill Bateman's Bistro and the Luna-C Grille. Maybe the River Hill Sports Grille, which opened in September, has hit on the winning combination -- plenty of televisions and a nothing-but-highlights menu. On a recent Saturday night, the restaurant was busy enough. Some tables were occupied by teens and young adults, others by families with young children.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1994
Five winning tickets were purchased at Laurel Race Course yesterday in the largest Double Triple pool at a Maryland thoroughbred track in nearly two years.Three of the five tickets, each worth $40,093.50, had been cashed by the end of racing yesterday, said Liz Quill, director of pari-mutuels. The total pool amounted to $200,467.50. The last time a Double Triple pool exceeded that amount and was hit, according to track records, was May 22, 1992 at Pimlico Race Course, when the pool amounted to $282,189.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff GzB | April 10, 1992
Richard A. Murray seemed at ease today after winning an $8.5 million jackpot in the Maryland Lotto."Everybody asked, 'How can you be so calm?' " the 69-year-old Hancock resident said. "I'm calm," his wife, 79-year-old Marianne, said.Maybe the big payoff hadn't sunk in. Maybe it's because, as the couple said, they've worked hard and lived a full, good life. The jackpot is like gravy, they said.One of their two sons, Hagerstown resident Michael Murray, said, "They deserve it. . . . But they already have a good life."
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer NLB | April 11, 1992
Richard A. Murray just won an $8.5 million jackpot in the Maryland Lotto. But you'd hardly know it."Everybody asked, 'How can you be so calm?' " the 69-year-old Hancock resident said yesterday at the Reisterstown Road headquarters of the Maryland Lottery Agency."
NEWS
June 12, 2007
Forget The Sopranos. Must-see TV last weekend was the Belmont Stakes, the third leg of the most emotionally satisfying Triple Crown series in years. A combination of excellent equine athletes, colorful supporting players and the sheer unpredictability that is horse racing produced a show that gave the sport so important to Maryland a shot in the arm. And, OK, this isn't really about girl power - except perhaps in the most literal sense. But when Rags to Riches dueled Preakness winner Curlin through the Belmont's closing stretch to become the first filly to win the mile-and-a-half classic in 102 years, the nearly three decades without a Triple Crown winner suddenly didn't seem to matter so much.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Evening Sun Staff | December 5, 1990
Two Baltimore County brothers, who have both been treated for cancer and live on disability insurance, cashed a single Double Triple ticket on the Laurel races yesterday worth $232,238.10.Stewart, 57, and Roger Stinchcomb, 63, correctly picked a winning combination in the third and fifth races, respectively, after investing a mere $24.The brothers, who live a mile apart in Randallstown, ended up with about $185,000 after taxes and will split the amount equally.Stewart said last night he plans to buy a marlin fishing boat for his part-time charter service in Ocean City.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2012
I will admit it, I came to the season premiere of "America's Got Talent" to rip Howard Stern. But I walk away after two hours with nothing but admiration for Stern and the producers of this potent franchise. And I'm not simply praising AGT as a slick or skilled production. "America's Got Talent" connects with some of the deepest currents of American life today. For all its sideshow, freakshow silliness and weirdness  at times, it also speaks to a huge slice of American life that our politicians don't seem to know or care about one little bit any more as they move from fund raiser to fund raiser and TV studio to soundstage in their cocoons of media and million-dollar isolation from the masses.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2010
Twelve days ago MI Developments Inc. revealed a $5.5 million bonus program for the Grade I Preakness at Pimlico Race Course. Tuesday, the company announced a similar, $2.2 million bonus for the Grade II Black-Eyed Susan stakes that has been traditionally run for fillies the Friday before the Preakness. To qualify for the $2.2 million bonus, $2 million of which goes to the owner and $200,000 to the trainer, a filly has to win three designated races at Gulfstream Park (the Forward Gal Stakes, the Davona Dale and the Oaks)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | June 12, 2008
Despite its high-visibility location in a Howard County village center, across from the Columbia Gym, the spot occupied by the River Hill Sports Grille has seen several restaurants come and go, including Bill Bateman's Bistro and the Luna-C Grille. Maybe the River Hill Sports Grille, which opened in September, has hit on the winning combination -- plenty of televisions and a nothing-but-highlights menu. On a recent Saturday night, the restaurant was busy enough. Some tables were occupied by teens and young adults, others by families with young children.
NEWS
June 12, 2007
Forget The Sopranos. Must-see TV last weekend was the Belmont Stakes, the third leg of the most emotionally satisfying Triple Crown series in years. A combination of excellent equine athletes, colorful supporting players and the sheer unpredictability that is horse racing produced a show that gave the sport so important to Maryland a shot in the arm. And, OK, this isn't really about girl power - except perhaps in the most literal sense. But when Rags to Riches dueled Preakness winner Curlin through the Belmont's closing stretch to become the first filly to win the mile-and-a-half classic in 102 years, the nearly three decades without a Triple Crown winner suddenly didn't seem to matter so much.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to the Sun | October 1, 2006
Ruth Eisenhour opened the padlock on the top of a wooden structure, swiped away some ants on its ledge and slid down into the crate-like contraption. She squatted and lopped off a couple branches of the blooming turtlehead plant. "This is the host plant for the Baltimore checkerspot butterflies," she said, holding a flower in the palm of her hand. "They are becoming more and more scarce, which means the checkerspots have no place to lay their eggs. And therefore their population is decreasing."
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 31, 2005
It was 1959 when the picture of a boat in Popular Mechanics magazine helped change the life of Maryland City resident Dave Augustine Sr. Augustine, then in his early 20s, and his father spent a weekend building the wooden boat in the photo. Then they built a couple more. And, that eventually whetted both men's interest in powerboat racing. Now, 46 years later, the Augustine name is known almost anywhere powerboats race in the United States. Various members of the Augustine family - including Dave Sr., his brother Gary and their sons - religiously find their way to compete in American Power Boat Association events all around the country.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | October 13, 1993
The Columbus Cup regatta got under way in Annapolis yesterday with six races in breezy conditions that made for tense racing among teams representing Japan, PACT '95, the Santa Maria Cup and the Chesapeake Bay.The Columbus Cup, which in previous years has been a match-race competition held on the Inner Harbor or the Patapsco River, has been split between Annapolis and Baltimore this year and changed to a team-racing format.PACT '95, a team representing an America's Cup defense syndicate, came out of the first round-robin undefeated but not without some anxious moments.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Writer | November 27, 1994
The last time Richie The Coach ran, Oct. 30, he laid off the pace set by Ameri Valay and never caught up, losing the Walter Haight Handicap by 3 1/4 lengths.Yesterday at Laurel Park, jockey Joe Rocco made sure there would be no rerun of that race.Rocco took the 3-year-old gelding into a commanding lead out of the gate and Richie The Coach rolled to a lopsided victory over eight rivals in the $75,000 Annapolis Stakes.Time for the 1 1/8 miles over the dirt was 1 minute, 49 2/5 seconds.JTC "He went to the lead real easy," said Rocco.
SPORTS
By Teddy Greenstein | August 4, 2005
CHICAGO - There was the simple answer, the type that will get airtime on the news. So, a reporter asked Joe Paterno on Tuesday, when do you plan to follow Wisconsin's Barry Alvarez and retire from coaching? "Barry said he knew when it was time," Paterno replied. "I don't know. I honestly wish I could tell you." Then there was the complex answer, the one in which Paterno offered a true glimpse into his 78-year-old mind. "If you said to me, take everything else out of my life - all the problems -and just concentrate [on football]
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2005
THEIR REPUTATIONS couldn't have been more different. One was a brash Boy Wonder with the proclivity to trade his own mother if it meant filling a middle-infield void. The other was an old-school loyalist with a reputed disdain for any modern ballplayer who couldn't match his work ethic and God-given talent, which meant about 99 percent of all major leaguers. That was a decade and several jobs ago. Now, Washington Nationals manager Frank Robinson, who turns 70 in August, is more relaxed, more accepting, more grandfatherly.
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