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Winnie Mandela

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By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | February 5, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The wife of South Africa's most famous black leader went on trial yesterday on kidnapping and assault charges stemming from a 1988 case that ended in the death of a 14-year-old activist.Looking composed and confident, Winnie Mandela sat silently in a small courtroom as her defense attorney argued that the kidnapping charges against her should be dropped because they had not been substantiated.Mrs. Mandela and seven others have been charged with the brutal beating of four young men who were abducted from a Methodist church house in December 1988 and taken to Mrs. Mandela's Soweto home.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 25, 2003
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, the former wife of Nelson Mandela who was once exalted as the "Mother of the Nation," was convicted of dozens of charges of theft and fraud yesterday. Madikizela-Mandela, 66, considered one of the most powerful figures in this country's fight against apartheid, could be sentenced to 15 years in jail on 43 counts of fraud and 25 counts of theft. A business associate, Andy Moolman, was found guilty of 58 charges of fraud and 25 of theft.
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NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | September 25, 1990
SOWETO, South Africa -- A somber Winnie Mandela was arraigned on charges of kidnapping and assault yesterday as Nelson Mandela sat in the front row of a small Soweto courtroom and dozens of supporters gathered outside.Magistrate Tom F. Veldman set a trial date of Feb. 4 for Mrs. Mandela and seven other defendants charged with abducting four young men from a Methodist Church house in December 1988. The case also was transferred from the local magistrate's court in Soweto to the regional court in Johannesburg.
NEWS
By From staff reports | June 24, 1999
In Baltimore CountyLawler is selected to be chief judge of Orphans' CourtANNAPOLIS -- Baltimore County Orphans' Court Judge Theresa A. Lawler was named the court's chief judge by Gov. Parris N. Glendening yesterday.Lawler has filled a court seat left vacant last year when Grace Connolly resigned to run for public office. Her responsibilities will include overseeing the administration of wills, trusts and estates.Lawler's 20-year legal career includes experience in estate and tax planning.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | April 17, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Mandela took the witness stand for the first time yesterday in her kidnapping and assault trial and said she was not even in Soweto when four young men were brought to her home there in December 1988.Mrs. Mandela, the wife of South Africa's most prominent black leader, African National Congress Deputy President Nelson Mandela, said she knew nothing about a kidnapping or assault. She said she believed that the young men had come to her home for shelter after being sexually abused by a white Methodist minister.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | September 19, 1990
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Mandela, the wife of South Africa's most prominent black leader, was charged with kidnapping and assault yesterday in a case that threatens to sidetrack South Africa's political reform process.The charges were announced by Johannesburg District Attorney General Klaus von Lieres, who recently prosecuted Mrs. Mandela's former bodyguard in the 1989 slaying of a teen-age activist who was abducted and taken to Mrs. Mandela's Soweto home.Jerry Richardson was sentenced to death last month for thmurder of James "Stompie" Moeketsi, 14, and seven other members of the bodyguard contingent are facing trial on kidnapping and assault charges in connection with the case.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | May 26, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Mandela is not one for quiet exits.To the apparent chagrin of some officials of the African National Congress, of which she remains a controversial member, Mrs. Mandela is still front-page news in South Africa.Some had hoped she would slip from the limelight after the breakup of her marriage to ANC leader Nelson Mandela last month and that she would lose her claim to power in South Africa's top black political organization.The power slippage is occurring as expected.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | February 17, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The trial of Winnie Mandela, wife of a prominent leader and herself a symbol of anti-apartheid defiance, produced a week of bizarre events that reflect on the woman, her husband and the most important black political group in South Africa.Once dubbed Mother of the Nation for boldly resisting government harassment, Mrs. Mandela now faces eight counts of kidnapping and assault in a case that involved the alleged beating of four young men in her home in 1988.One teen-ager died, and the other three victims were set to testify last week against Mrs. Mandela and her former bodyguards, a group that allegedly bullied and terrorized the township of Soweto.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 25, 1997
LET'S HOLD a Million Woman March in Philadelphia today, some black women got together and said. Fine. It's a noble idea. A good idea.Let's invite Winnie Mandela, some of them said.Bad idea, which shows that not everyone connected with today's event was actually thinking.Winnie Mandela? The one suspected of murder? The one whose life had become so rife with immorality that her husband had to dump her?But apparently Mandela - now known as Winnie Madikizela-Mandela - accepted. She will be one of the march's keynote speakers - along with U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters of California.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | September 20, 1990
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Police detained Winnie Mandela for nearly three hours yesterday in the black township of Thokoza, where she had gone to visit victims of recent violence.Mrs. Mandela accused the police of harassment and said that such treatment was not new to the Mandela family. "It's part of a continued pattern of harassment. The whole idea really is to undermine the African National Congress," she told reporters after she was released.Police said Mrs. Mandela, wife of ANC leader Nelson Mandela, was held for questioning in connection with spent bullet cartridges found in her possession when she was among those stopped at a roadblock.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 16, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, implicated last year in apartheid-era killings, kidnappings and torture, was named yesterday as one of the ruling African National Congress' top 10 candidates for this year's election. The former wife of President Nelson Mandela was listed ninth among 200 party candidates for the national legislature. Her high ranking provoked speculation here that she could be in line for a Cabinet position in the country's second black majority government.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | December 15, 1997
CAUGHT up in the anti-apartheid movement in the 1980s, I, too, sang:Bring back Nelson Mandela.Bring him back home to Soweto.I want to see him walking hand in handWith Winnie Mandela -- tomorrow!And when that scene actually took place on Feb. 11, 1990, few were happier than I that, as Mr. Mandela took his long walk to freedom, Winnie was there by his side, beaming, triumphant.Role modelsTo American blacks in need of superheroes, Nelson and Winnie were perfect -- so perfect that America's favorite dad, Bill Cosby, had the grandchildren on his television sitcom named Nelson and Winnie.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 5, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- After a day of vehement denial, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela bowed to an emotional appeal yesterday from Archbishop Desmond Tutu for an admission that "things went horribly wrong" when violence and death swirled around her in the late 1980s."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 4, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Jerry Richardson, coach of the notorious Mandela United Football Club, told the Truth and Reconciliation Commission yesterday that Winnie Madikizela-Mandela ordered all the murders and assaults he committed."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 2, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Amid allegations of witness intimidation, a convicted murderer told the Truth and Reconciliation Commission yesterday that he was carrying out the orders of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela when he killed a popular township doctor who was "disturbing her."Zakele Mbatha said Madikizela-Mandela, then the wife of an imprisoned Nelson Mandela, offered the killer and an accomplice about $4,000 to shoot Dr. Abu-Baker Asvat in his Soweto clinic in 1989. She also gave them the murder weapon, Mbatha testified.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 29, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The confessed killer of Stompie Seipei, the teen-age member of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela's "football club" who was beaten and murdered after being accused of being a police informer, was a police spy himself, South Africa's police chief told the Truth and Reconciliation Commission yesterday.And, according to a police intelligence officer who also testified, Stompie was killed because he had discovered the double role Jerry Richardson was playing and was threatening to expose him.Richardson, who was convicted of the murder and is now seeking amnesty for the slaying of Stompie and two other youths, was the coach of the Mandela United Football Club, a group of young men who, according to testimony, terrorized Soweto in the late 1980s.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | April 16, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Mandela announced her second separation yesterday.Only two days after Nelson Mandela announced that his marriage to her was over, she resigned a major post in the African National Congress, which he leads.It was a move that seemed to signal the end of a tempestuous political career in which she once embodied the anti-apartheid struggle for millions of people around the world.It also came amid increased publicity about Mrs. Mandela's involvement in a 1988 kidnapping and assault, for which she was tried and convicted last year.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | January 8, 1993
SOWETO, South Africa -- Winnie Mandela emerged from political isolation yesterday to launch a scathing attack on leaders of the African National Congress, which is headed by her estranged husband Nelson.Speaking at the grave site of Helen Joseph, a celebrated anti-apartheid campaigner who died last month at the age of 87, Mrs. Mandela criticized ANC leaders for cutting a deal to share power between "the elite of the oppressed and the oppressors."It was the first major speech by Mrs. Mandela since she was forced to resign her ANC positions last April after her highly publicized breakup with Mr. Mandela and her conviction on assault and kidnapping charges.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 28, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Madikizela-Mandela had become so frighteningly powerful and ruthless in the late 1980s that both local and national political movements tried to isolate the wife of the man who was to become president, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission was told yesterday.The commission, which is trying to exorcise the devils in this country's recent past, is investigating the violence surrounding Madikizela-Mandela, who is a candidate for the vice presidency of the ruling African National Congress when her former husband, Nelson Mandela steps down as party leader next month.
NEWS
November 26, 1997
WINNIE MADIKIZELA-Mandela may regret that she opted for open hearings before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission: The former wife of Nelson Mandela, who hopes to win the No. 2 spot in the African National Congress, is being depicted as a power-hungry murderer."
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