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Winnie Madikizela Mandela

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NEWS
November 26, 1997
WINNIE MADIKIZELA-Mandela may regret that she opted for open hearings before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission: The former wife of Nelson Mandela, who hopes to win the No. 2 spot in the African National Congress, is being depicted as a power-hungry murderer."
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NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 16, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, implicated last year in apartheid-era killings, kidnappings and torture, was named yesterday as one of the ruling African National Congress' top 10 candidates for this year's election. The former wife of President Nelson Mandela was listed ninth among 200 party candidates for the national legislature. Her high ranking provoked speculation here that she could be in line for a Cabinet position in the country's second black majority government.
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NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 16, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, implicated last year in apartheid-era killings, kidnappings and torture, was named yesterday as one of the ruling African National Congress' top 10 candidates for this year's election. The former wife of President Nelson Mandela was listed ninth among 200 party candidates for the national legislature. Her high ranking provoked speculation here that she could be in line for a Cabinet position in the country's second black majority government.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 5, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- After a day of vehement denial, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela bowed to an emotional appeal yesterday from Archbishop Desmond Tutu for an admission that "things went horribly wrong" when violence and death swirled around her in the late 1980s."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 25, 1997
LET'S HOLD a Million Woman March in Philadelphia today, some black women got together and said. Fine. It's a noble idea. A good idea.Let's invite Winnie Mandela, some of them said.Bad idea, which shows that not everyone connected with today's event was actually thinking.Winnie Mandela? The one suspected of murder? The one whose life had become so rife with immorality that her husband had to dump her?But apparently Mandela - now known as Winnie Madikizela-Mandela - accepted. She will be one of the march's keynote speakers - along with U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters of California.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 29, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Madikizela-Mandela -- divorced from the country's president, sacked from her government job, reprieved from a prison sentence -- is back, and in a big way.Her weekend re-election as president of the Women's League of the ruling African National Congress puts her in a key political position as the nation starts to prepare for the 1999 election of a successor to her former husband, President Nelson Mandela.Her triumph also coincided with the country's Freedom Day celebration of the first democratic elections here in 1994, which ended the era of apartheid and opened the way for the creation of what is proudly called a "rainbow nation."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 5, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- After a day of vehement denial, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela bowed to an emotional appeal yesterday from Archbishop Desmond Tutu for an admission that "things went horribly wrong" when violence and death swirled around her in the late 1980s."
NEWS
May 4, 1997
THE RE-ELECTION OF Winnie Madikizela-Mandela as president of the Women's League of the African National Congress has all the potential of throwing a monkey wrench into her former husband's carefully crafted succession plans. South Africa President Nelson Mandela has made it clear he views Deputy President Thabo Mbeki as his heir apparent.The problem is Mr. Mbeki does not have the charisma of Nelson Mandela. Winnie Madikizela-Mandela does. And she enjoys wide support among South African women.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 26, 2003
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, the ex-wife of Nelson Mandela, who was once exalted as the "Mother of the Nation," was sentenced yesterday to five years in jail with one year suspended after being convicted Thursday of dozens of charges of theft and fraud. Madikizela-Mandela, 66, who immediately issued a statement saying she would resign from Parliament and from posts in the governing African National Congress, had faced as many as 15 years in jail on 43 counts of fraud and 25 counts of theft.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 18, 2001
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - From the elegant halls of Parliament in Cape Town to the dusty, traffic-choked streets of Soweto, it is South Africa's burning question: Is it all over for Winnie Madikizela-Mandela? The authorities have announced that Madikizela-Mandela, the prominent political leader and former wife of Nelson Mandela, will be charged today with defrauding a bank of more than $103,000. Madikizela-Mandela has vehemently denied the accusations. Henriette Bester, a spokeswoman for the South African police, said Madikizela-Mandela would face 30 charges of fraud and 25 charges of theft when she turns herself in today.
NEWS
November 26, 1997
WINNIE MADIKIZELA-Mandela may regret that she opted for open hearings before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission: The former wife of Nelson Mandela, who hopes to win the No. 2 spot in the African National Congress, is being depicted as a power-hungry murderer."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 25, 1997
LET'S HOLD a Million Woman March in Philadelphia today, some black women got together and said. Fine. It's a noble idea. A good idea.Let's invite Winnie Mandela, some of them said.Bad idea, which shows that not everyone connected with today's event was actually thinking.Winnie Mandela? The one suspected of murder? The one whose life had become so rife with immorality that her husband had to dump her?But apparently Mandela - now known as Winnie Madikizela-Mandela - accepted. She will be one of the march's keynote speakers - along with U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters of California.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 29, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Madikizela-Mandela -- divorced from the country's president, sacked from her government job, reprieved from a prison sentence -- is back, and in a big way.Her weekend re-election as president of the Women's League of the ruling African National Congress puts her in a key political position as the nation starts to prepare for the 1999 election of a successor to her former husband, President Nelson Mandela.Her triumph also coincided with the country's Freedom Day celebration of the first democratic elections here in 1994, which ended the era of apartheid and opened the way for the creation of what is proudly called a "rainbow nation."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 25, 2003
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, the former wife of Nelson Mandela who was once exalted as the "Mother of the Nation," was convicted of dozens of charges of theft and fraud yesterday. Madikizela-Mandela, 66, considered one of the most powerful figures in this country's fight against apartheid, could be sentenced to 15 years in jail on 43 counts of fraud and 25 counts of theft. A business associate, Andy Moolman, was found guilty of 58 charges of fraud and 25 of theft.
NEWS
December 25, 1997
NELSON MANDELA will remain South Africa's president until his term ends in 1999. But the daily running of the government has already largely shifted into the hands of Thabo Mbeki, his 55-year-old deputy who last week was elected president of the ruling African National Congress.Africa's post-colonial history is full of freedom fighter presidents who could not relinquish power. Mr. Mandela, 79, decided he would not go down in history as having stayed on too long. He insisted that his initial timetable for the transfer of power be adhered to. He is ready to assume the role of elder statesman, letting a younger generation take charge.
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