Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWinfield Scott
IN THE NEWS

Winfield Scott

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | April 5, 2009
David Winfield Scott, a noted American artist and author and former Eastern Shore resident who was the founding director of the National Museum of American Art, died of multiple organ failure Monday at an Austin, Texas, hospice. He was 92. Dr. Scott was born in Fall River, Mass., and raised in Claremont, Calif., where his father was a professor at Pomona College. After graduating from the Webb School in Claremont, he studied painting with Millard Sheets, a prominent California watercolorist, who became a formative influence on the young artist.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | April 5, 2009
David Winfield Scott, a noted American artist and author and former Eastern Shore resident who was the founding director of the National Museum of American Art, died of multiple organ failure Monday at an Austin, Texas, hospice. He was 92. Dr. Scott was born in Fall River, Mass., and raised in Claremont, Calif., where his father was a professor at Pomona College. After graduating from the Webb School in Claremont, he studied painting with Millard Sheets, a prominent California watercolorist, who became a formative influence on the young artist.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Andrew D. Faith and Andrew D. Faith,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2001
At the outset of the Civil War, the commander of the federal army was Lt. Gen. Winfield Scott, who had been promoted to brigadier general for heroic service during the War of 1812. Scott had taken over as head of the U.S. Army in 1841. In 1847 he led the American army to victory in the War with Mexico. Scott was born June 13, 1786, at his father's farm near Petersburg, Va. He graduated from the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Va., and then studied law in Petersburg. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Scott was 74 years old. Although too sick to command the army in the field, he left his mark on the Battle of Bull Run and on the subsequent Union strategy for the war. After the fall of Fort Sumter, the regular army consisted of 1,098 officers and 15,304 enlisted men. "The officers of the regular army constituted a closely knit family of which Scott was the father," Page Smith writes in Trial by Fire, published in 1982.
NEWS
By Nicholas Prindle and Nicholas Prindle,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
The concluding event of the Gettysburg re-enactment highlights the fateful charge led by Confederate Maj. Gen. George Edward Pickett on the third and final day of the Gettysburg campaign. After a bombardment of the Union line on Cemetery Ridge with heavy artillery fire, about 15,000 men - including Pickett's entire division and a portion of A.P. Hill's corps - charged, and briefly breached, the first Union line. While many accounts of Pickett's Charge suggest a back-and-forth battle with victories and losses on either side, the words and deeds of Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock testify to a decisive Union victory that was never really in doubt.
FEATURES
October 27, 1991
December 1860. It was a fateful month for Marylanders and al U.S. citizens as South Carolina seceded from the Union and other Southern states soon joined it. In a few short months, Confederate troops would begin shelling federal property, specifically Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor.How ready were the federal troops -- in Maryland and elsewher-- for the start of the Civil War? And who were some of the high-ranking military men with Maryland connections?The only immediate force that the government had at its command to stem the tide of war was its regular Army -- a scattered force of 16,000 men. They were expected to provide security in a country of more than 30 million people on 4 million square miles of land.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | November 23, 1992
A COUPLE of months ago I described Franklin Pierce as being "the obscure New Hampshire senator" who was nominated for president in 1852 after all the leading contenders refused to concede to each other.I got a letter from his great-great-great-grandnephew, Winston Wood of Berryville, Va. I saved it till today, Pierce's 188th birthday."While it's true Frank Pierce was one of the darkest of political horses [Wood wrote], he was hardly obscure. He served in both the House and Senate, was offered the post of attorney general in the Polk administration but rejected it to enlist as a private in the Mexican War, rising to brigadier.
NEWS
By Nicholas Prindle and Nicholas Prindle,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
The concluding event of the Gettysburg re-enactment highlights the fateful charge led by Confederate Maj. Gen. George Edward Pickett on the third and final day of the Gettysburg campaign. After a bombardment of the Union line on Cemetery Ridge with heavy artillery fire, about 15,000 men - including Pickett's entire division and a portion of A.P. Hill's corps - charged, and briefly breached, the first Union line. While many accounts of Pickett's Charge suggest a back-and-forth battle with victories and losses on either side, the words and deeds of Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock testify to a decisive Union victory that was never really in doubt.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 2000
More than 35 years ago, Joe and Emma Foltz decided to head out to the country to find space of their own where they wouldn't feel confined. What they found was Winfield. "We knew nothing about the area until we moved here. But we liked it because it was small and rural," said Emma Foltz, who moved with her husband from the Pikesville area of Baltimore County. "This is still such a nice community. You just meet really nice people out here. It's a quiet community, but we like it." Nestled almost exactly halfway between Frederick and Baltimore, Winfield surrounds the intersection of Woodbine, Salem Bottom and Liberty roads in southern Carroll County.
NEWS
By Peter Kumpa | January 14, 1991
AMERICANS can claim "Yankee Doodle" as one of their very own -- native born, not foreign. The tune ranks as one of the most popular in Colonial times, during the Revolutionary War and well after it. It was the original carrier of American patriotism, a thumb-your-nose outcry against a parent country.Once, it had been taken for granted that the simple ditty was of English origin, probably from a nursery rhyme. Other theories had the song arising from Dutch, French or even German sources. Exhaustive research by Prof.
NEWS
June 27, 2004
Re-enactment set for July 2-4 at Gettysburg The re-enactment at Gettysburg will take place July 2, 3 and 4, and will commemorate the 141st anniversary of the battle. Tickets for persons 13 and older at the gate are $20 for one day, $35 for two days, and $48 for all three days. A schedule of the re-enactment. Page 2G Henry W. Halleck's role remains controversial. Page 2G Oliver O. Howard's reputation was stained on the battlefield. Page 3G Winfield Scott Hancock held the Union line. Page 7G Robert E. Lee made few comments about the battle.
NEWS
By Andrew D. Faith and Andrew D. Faith,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2001
At the outset of the Civil War, the commander of the federal army was Lt. Gen. Winfield Scott, who had been promoted to brigadier general for heroic service during the War of 1812. Scott had taken over as head of the U.S. Army in 1841. In 1847 he led the American army to victory in the War with Mexico. Scott was born June 13, 1786, at his father's farm near Petersburg, Va. He graduated from the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Va., and then studied law in Petersburg. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Scott was 74 years old. Although too sick to command the army in the field, he left his mark on the Battle of Bull Run and on the subsequent Union strategy for the war. After the fall of Fort Sumter, the regular army consisted of 1,098 officers and 15,304 enlisted men. "The officers of the regular army constituted a closely knit family of which Scott was the father," Page Smith writes in Trial by Fire, published in 1982.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 2000
More than 35 years ago, Joe and Emma Foltz decided to head out to the country to find space of their own where they wouldn't feel confined. What they found was Winfield. "We knew nothing about the area until we moved here. But we liked it because it was small and rural," said Emma Foltz, who moved with her husband from the Pikesville area of Baltimore County. "This is still such a nice community. You just meet really nice people out here. It's a quiet community, but we like it." Nestled almost exactly halfway between Frederick and Baltimore, Winfield surrounds the intersection of Woodbine, Salem Bottom and Liberty roads in southern Carroll County.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | November 23, 1992
A COUPLE of months ago I described Franklin Pierce as being "the obscure New Hampshire senator" who was nominated for president in 1852 after all the leading contenders refused to concede to each other.I got a letter from his great-great-great-grandnephew, Winston Wood of Berryville, Va. I saved it till today, Pierce's 188th birthday."While it's true Frank Pierce was one of the darkest of political horses [Wood wrote], he was hardly obscure. He served in both the House and Senate, was offered the post of attorney general in the Polk administration but rejected it to enlist as a private in the Mexican War, rising to brigadier.
FEATURES
October 27, 1991
December 1860. It was a fateful month for Marylanders and al U.S. citizens as South Carolina seceded from the Union and other Southern states soon joined it. In a few short months, Confederate troops would begin shelling federal property, specifically Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor.How ready were the federal troops -- in Maryland and elsewher-- for the start of the Civil War? And who were some of the high-ranking military men with Maryland connections?The only immediate force that the government had at its command to stem the tide of war was its regular Army -- a scattered force of 16,000 men. They were expected to provide security in a country of more than 30 million people on 4 million square miles of land.
NEWS
By Peter Kumpa | January 14, 1991
AMERICANS can claim "Yankee Doodle" as one of their very own -- native born, not foreign. The tune ranks as one of the most popular in Colonial times, during the Revolutionary War and well after it. It was the original carrier of American patriotism, a thumb-your-nose outcry against a parent country.Once, it had been taken for granted that the simple ditty was of English origin, probably from a nursery rhyme. Other theories had the song arising from Dutch, French or even German sources. Exhaustive research by Prof.
NEWS
June 24, 2008
MARY FRANCIS WEBBER born July 13, 1929, passed June 18, 2008 at Hospice of Queen Anne. She worked at Murphy for 18 years and retired from Sisk Mailing Service after 20 years. Wife of the late Benjamin Weber, daughter of the late Anne May Morgan and Winfield Scott Morgan. Beloved mother of the late Robert Webber. Survived by her sister Linda Moore, Sara McCore, Edna Smallwood, Evelyn Hoffman, Jenny Bury and brother Winfield Scout Morgan, Jr. Also survived by granddaughter Laura Webber and close friends Gail Smith and family.
FEATURES
September 14, 1993
THIS DATE IN HISTORY: SEPT. 14In 1814, Francis Scott Key wrote his famous poem "The Star-Spangled Banner" after witnessing the British bombardment of Fort McHenry.In 1847, U.S. forces under Gen. Winfield Scott took control of Mexico City.In 1901, President William McKinley died in Buffalo, N.Y., of gunshot wounds inflicted by an assassin. Vice President Theodore Roosevelt succeeded him.In 1927, modern-dance pioneer Isadora Duncan died in Nice, France, when her scarf became entangled in a wheel of her sports car.In 1959, the Soviet space probe Luna Two became the first man-made object to reach the moon as it crashed onto the lunar surface.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.