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By Lisa Airy, thewinekey@aol.com | November 8, 2012
It takes a lot to build a legacy. Hard work, vision, long-distance planning, and a tight-knit circle of family and friends to keep it all together. Although America's history is relatively short compared with that of Europe, we've still got a legacy or two. And some even come with a castle. George Vanderbilt's massive Asheville, N.C., estate was fashioned after three French chateaux and took six years to construct 91889-1895) There are 250 rooms, 34 bedrooms, and 65 fireplaces covering four acres of floor space.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
Though New Year's Eve is less than a week away, even last-minute party planners have time to add a Maryland sparkling wine to their celebrations. With seven of the state's 56 wineries producing America's version of champagne, the local wine industry has a lot to offer. "Most well-made sparkling wines have a freshness imparted by the effervescence and the bright fruit," says Kevin Atticks, executive director of the Maryland Wine Association, which is based in Timonium . And besides, "Bubblies are interesting and look so nice in the glass," he says.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 22, 1991
SILVER RUN -- Dave Argento is looking for a few very special investors for a virtually risk-free venture.That is, there's all but no risk of dividends or capital gains anytime soon. And short of an oil strike in the vineyards of Carroll County, there's absolutely no risk of ever making a killing.That's because Mr. Argento's plan, as outlined in a draft prospectus, is to raise $224,000 to save Montbray Wine Cellars, a pioneering but impoverished winery in the scenic Silver Run Valley, barely a grape's throw from the Pennsylvania border.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Boordy Vineyards, Maryland's oldest and one of its largest wineries, has started over. Transforming the northern Baltimore County winery meant ripping up its grape-growing and winemaking operations literally root and branch, and rebuilding them at a cost of more than $3.3 million. "What we're doing is making a big investment in the future of making wine in Maryland," said Rob Deford, Boordy's president and co-owner, whose family will host a reception this week opening the new winemaking operation.
NEWS
March 31, 1991
Dave Argento is looking to raise $224,000 to save Montbray Wine Cellars.Founded in 1964 and bonded in 1966, Montbray has been operating on a shoestring under its founder, ex-Johns Hopkins psychologist G. Hamilton Mowbray.Maryland's second-oldest winery and the oldest to be continuouslyoperated in one place, Montbray was the first commercial winery to successfully grow classic European (vinifera) grapes in the mid-Atlantic states. It made the region's first Riesling, chardonnay and cabernet sauvignon, all of which were critically praised.
NEWS
May 9, 1995
Linganore Winecellars, a vineyard of 230 acres in Mount Airy, has been chosen the official winery of Preakness Celebration 1995.Linganore's award-winning wines will be displayed and available for sampling and purchase at a number of Preakness events from the Friday opening ceremonies to the running of the Preakness on May 20.The winery won six medals at the 1994 Governor's Cup competition, including a gold medal for its Vidal wine.POLICE* Mount Airy: A resident of Boteler Road reported to state police that someone broke into his auto and stole a CD player, MTX speakers and two CDs while the vehicle was parked near his home Friday.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL DRESSER | March 1, 1992
Chateau Souverain is not a cutting-edge winery.It doesn't dabble in exotic Rhone Valley or Italian grape varieties. It doesn't make sparkling wine. It doesn't make any $40 reserve bottlings in collaboration with famous French wine-makers.All Chateau Souverain does is make flavorful, reasonably complex, ready-to-drink versions of the most basic California varietals: chardonnay, sauvignon blanc, merlot, cabernet sauvignon and zinfandel. And it sells them for attractive prices.In today's wine market, that's nothing to scoff at. The honest laborers of the wine world deserve recognition, too.Five years ago, however, it was more difficult for Chateau Souverain to get much attention at all.Tom Peterson, Chateau Souverain's winemaker, and Michael Florian, its public relations director, still remember one incident in Baltimore back then.
TRAVEL
By The Washington Post | September 20, 2009
Maryland has only a fraction of the wineries that Virginia has, but there are several trails that lead to the grapes, including the Chesapeake Wine Trail along the Eastern Shore and the Patuxent Wine Trail in southern Calvert County. We took a quick peek at a cluster along the Frederick Trail in Frederick County. Here are a few stops to make: Black Ankle Vineyards, 14463 Black Ankle Road, Mount Airy. This newcomer, which opened only last year, is building buzz for its dry, sophisticated wines, such as its red Crumbling Rock blend.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | July 30, 2006
Winemaking is still a tiny part of the Maryland agricultural scene, but it's growing as fast as those weeds in your backyard vegetable patch. "We have had unbelievable growth the past two years," said Rose Fiore. "We have gone from 12 wineries to 22." Rose Fiore operates Fiore Winery in the Pylesville section of Harford County with her husband, Mike. She also serves as the industry's representative on the Maryland Agricultural Commission, a 27-member panel composed of a cross-section of farming that advises the Secretary of Agriculture on farm issues.
BUSINESS
By Jane Applegate and Jane Applegate,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 24, 1992
AHOPLAND, Calif. -- When 10-year-old Barney Fetzer heard his family's winery was being sold and they could no longer use the Fetzer brand name, he was worried that he would no longer be a Fetzer.His father, Jim, the outgoing president, assured him and the rest of the Fetzer grandchildren that although their grandmother and 11 aunts and uncles were selling the successful family business, they would all still be Fetzers.Two weeks after the Fetzers culminated a three-year courtship with Louisville, Ky.-based Brown-Forman Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2013
From: South Mountain Vineyard, Maryland Price: $30 Serve with: Grilled meat, roast poultry, hard cheeses This is not only the greatest Maryland wine I've tasted in 30 years of sampling the home state product, it's the best red wine from the Eastern United States I've ever encountered. That's not just my view: Boordy's cab franc took Best of Show in the recent Eastern Seaboard Wine Association competition involving wineries from 12 states. This wine is as smooth, elegant and complex as a top-flight St. Emilion from France, but it has a character all its own. The black cherry flavors and herbal notes are penetrating and persistent.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
This could be the big summer of cider. We've fallen hard for the crisp dry hard ciders coming out of Millstone Cellars in Monkton, which are so refreshing for hot-weather dining. The Maryland Wineries will host Locapour - Drink Local , a tasting event at the Baltimore County Center for Maryland Agriculture and Farm Park on July 11 featuring five Maryland cider and mead producers. The event will include food vendors, live music and family activities. The participating wine producers are Great Shoals Winery (Princess Anne)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013
From: Central Coast, Calif. Price: $15 Serve with: Red meat, especially with raspberry sauce The GSM stands for grenache, syrah and mourvedre - the three classic Rhone Valley grapes that go into this exceptional red blend. The wine is extremely fruity and smooth, with deep flavor of raspberries and Chambord liqueur. It's one of those dry wines that gives the impression of sweetness through its sheer abundance of fruit. It's penetrating, intense and finishes with fine acidity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
Starting June 1, there will be fewer restrictions for Maryland wineries that want to sell wine and offer samples at farmers' markets. New rules passed by the General Assembly and signed by Gov. Martin O'Malley will remove limits on the number of days a winery can attend markets each year. “There were a number of restrictions in the law that kept wineries from attending as many markets as they like,” said Kevin Atticks, executive director of the Maryland Wineries Association.
FEATURES
By L'Oreal Thompson, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
Wedding date: March 23, 2013 Her story: Ashley Cook, 30, grew up in Woodbridge, Va. She is a literary academic content liaison for Baltimore City Public Schools. Her mother, Sherry, is a facilities manager for a government contracting agency in Virginia. Her father, Patrick, passed away last year. His story: Phillip Plymouth, 29, grew up in Randallstown. He is an accountant for the American Postal Workers Union Health Plan. His mother, Bernice Brooks-Plymouth, is a psychiatric nurse at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
EXPLORE
L'Oreal Thompson and Jennifer Broadwater | April 16, 2013
With four vineyards conveniently located in practically each corner of Harford County, you don't have to travel all the way to Sonoma to sip award-winning wines, experience scenic vistas and learn all about the winemaking process. In 2010, Harford County government, along with Baltimore County government and the Maryland Winery Association, created the Piedmont Wine Trail “in hopes that people would cross county borders and spend more time (and money in local businesses) in their quest for good wine,” according to Wini Roche, tourism and marketing manager for Harford County government.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | March 31, 1991
Just listening to Michel Chapoutier, it would be easy to conclude that the young man is a little, well, odd.Here he is talking about giving his grapevines "a paid vacation." He goes on about how he learned more about winemaking from reading dusty, old family records than from distinguished professors of oenology.And all the time this diminutive young man gestures broadly and grins wildly -- looking more like a jockey on uppers than the winemaker of one of the oldest and largest family wine firms in France's Rhone Valley.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 22, 1997
SAGAPONACK, N.Y. - Sagpond Vineyards, the biggest producer of wines from estate-grown grapes on the South Fork of Long Island, has opened its new multimillion-dollar winery.The winery, at 139 Sagg Road, a bit north of Route 27 in Sagaponack, occupies a saffron-colored stucco building that the owner, Christian Wolffer, describes as Tuscan in style.The winery has nearly 50 acres of vineyards.The opening coincided with the early stages of grape growing and the vacation season. Visits to wineries on the South and North Forks, which lead to perhaps 75 percent of all winery sales, increase from Memorial Day and peak in October at harvest.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
Ronald J. Biglin, a former business professor and dean of graduate programs at what is now Loyola University Maryland who owned a winery and a distribution company, died Monday at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Lutherville resident was 81. "Ron always got outstanding ratings from the students. He taught in the executive program and marketing, plus he had lots of professional experience. For instance, he knew what it meant to do a payroll," said Charles R. "Bob" Margenthaler, who was dean of the business school at Loyola from 1985 to 1992.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2013
From: California Price: $11 Serve with: Hamburgers, pizza, casual fare The jug-shaped bottle is a little odd, but the wine inside is more than sound. It won't blow you away with its complexity, but it offers a lot of ripe fruit at an attractive price. It's a zinfandel-syrah-cabernet blend of medium to full body with flavors of black cherry, blueberry earth and spice - with a hint of leather reminiscent of an Aussie red. Enjoy it in its engaging youth. - Michael Dresser
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