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By New York Times News Service | March 28, 1993
Q: Do you know of companies that run tours of the wine regions of France?.A: World Wine Tours, 69-71 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE, England, telephone (0865) 310 344 (the country code for England is 44; when dialing from the United States drop the zero before the area code), offers six such itineraries in France, each led by a wine expert.There are separate tours to Alsace, the Loire Valley, Bordeaux, Gascony, Burgundy and the Rhone Valley. The five-day Alsace tour, beginning June 26 and Aug. 29 in Basel, costs $1,320 a person based on two sharing a room, and includes lodging, meals, visits to wineries and wine tastings.
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By Lisa Aireythewinekey@aol.com | October 6, 2011
I touched down in Gisbourne, New Zealand, on a flying "cigar tube with wings. " The placards to that town read "First to see the light" and "First to see the New Millennium. " Having crossed the international dateline while in a more sizable bird and "lost a day" while flying, the signage seemed even more disorienting. This was the locale to which international observers flocked on Dec. 31, 1999, to see how the Y2K bug would strike because Gisbourne is the first place to see the dawn in the world every year.
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TRAVEL
March 17, 2002
Vacationing Survivor-style may seem like an oxymoron, but that hasn't stopped Island Quest Vacations. "Survivor was the inspiration," says company spokeswoman Annesophia Alexander. Island Quest trips will mimic the reality show, she says, but "there's no eating bugs, starving or getting voted off." Although no trips have been scheduled yet, Island Quest's plan is to give vacationers a week of fun in the sun -- on St. Croix or aboard a Royal Caribbean ship -- with daily quests, secret missions and nightly point-earning summits.
NEWS
By Corie Brown and Corie Brown,Los Angeles Times | March 7, 2007
Imagine a world in which the best sparkling wines come from Surrey in southern England, not Champagne, France. A world where Monterey Bay is home to California's best cabernet sauvignons and Sweden produces world-class rieslings. It's not science fiction. A growing number of climatologists are warning that by the turn of the next century, such a radically altered wine map could be the new reality. They say man-made greenhouse gases warming the planet are expected to shift viticultural regions toward the poles, cooler coastal zones and higher elevations.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 22, 1996
Virginia's emergence as a center for viniculture has been anticipated for almost 400 years, but it is only in the last decade that Virginia wines have established themselves.About 50 wineries around the state now produce a variety of wines, many of which are made from vinifera grapes.Many of Virginia's wineries are small and family owned, some producing no more than 5,000 cases a year, and many of these wines never leave Virginia - or, if they do, they make it just over the border to Washington and surrounding Southern states.
NEWS
By Corie Brown and Corie Brown,Los Angeles Times | March 7, 2007
Imagine a world in which the best sparkling wines come from Surrey in southern England, not Champagne, France. A world where Monterey Bay is home to California's best cabernet sauvignons and Sweden produces world-class rieslings. It's not science fiction. A growing number of climatologists are warning that by the turn of the next century, such a radically altered wine map could be the new reality. They say man-made greenhouse gases warming the planet are expected to shift viticultural regions toward the poles, cooler coastal zones and higher elevations.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Aireythewinekey@aol.com | October 6, 2011
I touched down in Gisbourne, New Zealand, on a flying "cigar tube with wings. " The placards to that town read "First to see the light" and "First to see the New Millennium. " Having crossed the international dateline while in a more sizable bird and "lost a day" while flying, the signage seemed even more disorienting. This was the locale to which international observers flocked on Dec. 31, 1999, to see how the Y2K bug would strike because Gisbourne is the first place to see the dawn in the world every year.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | January 20, 1991
Dear Readers,I apologize.Recently I realized that in eight and one-half years of writing this column, I have not once devoted an article to the great red wines of Chateauneuf-du-Pape.In that time I have written repeatedly about Bordeaux, California cabernet sauvignon, Barbaresco and Barolo, Burgundy and the wines of the northern Rhone. Somehow, for no reason I can adequately explain, I have never gotten around to telling readers about a wine that can equal any of them -- at a better price.
TRAVEL
By BARBARA A. NOE and BARBARA A. NOE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 22, 2002
About an hour's drive west of the nation's capital, turn off the interstate and you'll think you've stumbled upon a different century. Beneath the peaceful gaze of the Blue Ridge, country roads edged with flowery meadows, horse pastures and old red barns seem straight out of a picture book, while slumbering little towns, world-class restaurants and a bevy of B&Bs give more than enough reason to relax and stay awhile. But there's something more brewing here than quiet, beautiful scenery -- or, should I say, fermenting.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2003
Don Segal's vineyard, with its rows of bare midwinter vines and wood and wire trellises, sits on Annapolis' Harness Creek, a quiet nook where kayaks skim over glassy water. It bears the name of Segal's yet-to-be-unveiled boutique wine. Segal's Anne Arundel County vineyard, which he hopes will be Maryland's 13th winery, is representative of the state's burgeoning grape-growing and wine-making industry, as well as a concerted effort by state officials to establish a cluster of wineries in southern counties such as Anne Arundel, Prince George's and Calvert - where tobacco was once king.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2003
Don Segal's vineyard, with its rows of bare midwinter vines and wood and wire trellises, sits on Annapolis' Harness Creek, a quiet nook where kayaks skim over glassy water. It bears the name of Segal's yet-to-be-unveiled boutique wine. Segal's Anne Arundel County vineyard, which he hopes will be Maryland's 13th winery, is representative of the state's burgeoning grape-growing and wine-making industry, as well as a concerted effort by state officials to establish a cluster of wineries in southern counties such as Anne Arundel, Prince George's and Calvert - where tobacco was once king.
TRAVEL
By BARBARA A. NOE and BARBARA A. NOE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 22, 2002
About an hour's drive west of the nation's capital, turn off the interstate and you'll think you've stumbled upon a different century. Beneath the peaceful gaze of the Blue Ridge, country roads edged with flowery meadows, horse pastures and old red barns seem straight out of a picture book, while slumbering little towns, world-class restaurants and a bevy of B&Bs give more than enough reason to relax and stay awhile. But there's something more brewing here than quiet, beautiful scenery -- or, should I say, fermenting.
TRAVEL
March 17, 2002
Vacationing Survivor-style may seem like an oxymoron, but that hasn't stopped Island Quest Vacations. "Survivor was the inspiration," says company spokeswoman Annesophia Alexander. Island Quest trips will mimic the reality show, she says, but "there's no eating bugs, starving or getting voted off." Although no trips have been scheduled yet, Island Quest's plan is to give vacationers a week of fun in the sun -- on St. Croix or aboard a Royal Caribbean ship -- with daily quests, secret missions and nightly point-earning summits.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | November 23, 1997
To most people who have a serious interest in California wine, the names of the Napa Valley and Sonoma County are more than just familiar. They are almost synonymous with Wine Country.But if you have a little more space in your wine memory banks, you might just want to save a little of it for Contra Costa County, Amador County and Paso Robles.Like Sonoma and Napa, these three far-flung regions are important growing regions for zinfandel -- that most American of the world's great red wines.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 22, 1996
Virginia's emergence as a center for viniculture has been anticipated for almost 400 years, but it is only in the last decade that Virginia wines have established themselves.About 50 wineries around the state now produce a variety of wines, many of which are made from vinifera grapes.Many of Virginia's wineries are small and family owned, some producing no more than 5,000 cases a year, and many of these wines never leave Virginia - or, if they do, they make it just over the border to Washington and surrounding Southern states.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | March 28, 1993
Q: Do you know of companies that run tours of the wine regions of France?.A: World Wine Tours, 69-71 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE, England, telephone (0865) 310 344 (the country code for England is 44; when dialing from the United States drop the zero before the area code), offers six such itineraries in France, each led by a wine expert.There are separate tours to Alsace, the Loire Valley, Bordeaux, Gascony, Burgundy and the Rhone Valley. The five-day Alsace tour, beginning June 26 and Aug. 29 in Basel, costs $1,320 a person based on two sharing a room, and includes lodging, meals, visits to wineries and wine tastings.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | November 23, 1997
To most people who have a serious interest in California wine, the names of the Napa Valley and Sonoma County are more than just familiar. They are almost synonymous with Wine Country.But if you have a little more space in your wine memory banks, you might just want to save a little of it for Contra Costa County, Amador County and Paso Robles.Like Sonoma and Napa, these three far-flung regions are important growing regions for zinfandel -- that most American of the world's great red wines.
NEWS
January 31, 2007
NATIONAL Warming debate heats up After years of languishing on Capitol Hill, efforts to curb global warming have picked up momentum, powered by a growing bipartisan belief that climate change can no longer be ignored. pg 3a MARYLAND Report released in teen's death A report released yesterday by Bowling Brook Preparatory School describes what happened when Isaiah Simmons lost consciousness while being restrained by staff in the residential program for juvenile offenders. pg 1a Who will head the PSC?
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | January 20, 1991
Dear Readers,I apologize.Recently I realized that in eight and one-half years of writing this column, I have not once devoted an article to the great red wines of Chateauneuf-du-Pape.In that time I have written repeatedly about Bordeaux, California cabernet sauvignon, Barbaresco and Barolo, Burgundy and the wines of the northern Rhone. Somehow, for no reason I can adequately explain, I have never gotten around to telling readers about a wine that can equal any of them -- at a better price.
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