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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2010
Consumer advocates are worried that a study of whether to overturn Maryland's much-criticized ban on direct-to-home shipments of wine might be stained by the same alcohol interests that have blocked changes in the General Assembly for years. Wine drinkers said they were dismayed to find that they weren't invited to the first meeting last week held by the Maryland comptroller's office to study the wine-shipping issue. The study commission seems to be focused on the potential impact on liquor wholesalers and distributors, and could "overlook" consumers, said Adam Borden, former executive director of Marylanders for Better Beer and Wine Laws.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2012
John and Cindy Stevenson had the perfect set-up Saturday at the Maryland Wine Festival: topped-off glasses of vino, a cadre of friends and family, blankets and chairs spread out under a shade tree, crusty bread, caprese salad and two kinds of cheese. The Ellicott City wine connoisseurs were among thousands who attended the 29th annual event on the sprawling grounds of Carroll County Farm Museum in Westminster. The two-day event continues Sunday from noon to 6 p.m. The Stevensons said Napa Valley has nothing on Maryland's homegrown wines.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
Corkage is coming. Beginning July 1, Maryland joins some 25 other states where diners may bring their own bottles of wine into licensed establishments.  Restaurants can choose whether or not to allow the practice, known as corkage, but must have a permit to do so. Restaurants that choose to allow corkage can determine what, if any, fee they levy on diners. They can charge, really, whatever they want, and diners are free to shop around as they like. That fee is known as a corkage fee. And a no-fee policy is typically promoted by restaurants as "corkage-free" dining.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
Corkage is coming. Beginning July 1, Maryland joins some 25 other states where diners may bring their own bottles of wine into licensed establishments.  Restaurants can choose whether or not to allow the practice, known as corkage, but must have a permit to do so. Restaurants that choose to allow corkage can determine what, if any, fee they levy on diners. They can charge, really, whatever they want, and diners are free to shop around as they like. That fee is known as a corkage fee. And a no-fee policy is typically promoted by restaurants as "corkage-free" dining.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 6, 2010
As it turns out, 2010 probably won't be the vintage year for Marylanders who want to buy wine over the Internet or receive deliveries from Napa Valley. The head of a key Annapolis committee said Friday that it "will be a challenge" for his panel to endorse an end to a ban on direct wine shipments. Wine-lovers and state wineries have been pushing to overturn the prohibition for years but have been blocked by the state's powerful liquor lobby and lawmakers sympathetic to the industry.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2011
Consumer advocates pleaded with lawmakers Monday to let customers bring their own bottles of wine to restaurants in Baltimore City and three other counties, saying the state's high-end eateries want to extend the option to their clienteles. But opponents of the legislation, including the Restaurant Association of Maryland and the liquor lobby, argued Monday before the House Economic Matters Committee that the arrangement would eat into restaurant profits and generate uncertainty about liability when consumers drink too much.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman | laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | November 27, 2009
Wine lovers are planning an all-out lobbying offensive in the General Assembly next year for passage of a law that would allow merchants and wineries to ship directly to Maryland consumers. The issue has fermented for years in the legislature where a bill has been bottled up in committee, but wine producers and connoisseurs see an opportunity in the next session that begins in January. They say they have more funding and support, and they hope to draw votes by casting the bill as a pro-consumer issue that lawmakers can promote to voters before the 2010 election.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2012
John and Cindy Stevenson had the perfect set-up Saturday at the Maryland Wine Festival: topped-off glasses of vino, a cadre of friends and family, blankets and chairs spread out under a shade tree, crusty bread, caprese salad and two kinds of cheese. The Ellicott City wine connoisseurs were among thousands who attended the 29th annual event on the sprawling grounds of Carroll County Farm Museum in Westminster. The two-day event continues Sunday from noon to 6 p.m. The Stevensons said Napa Valley has nothing on Maryland's homegrown wines.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | February 8, 2010
Most Maryland lawmakers, a swath of Democrats and Republicans from across the state, want adults to be able to have bottles of wine shipped to their homes, something that's legal in 37 other states. When it was filed last week, a bill repealing the quarter-century-old direct-shipping ban included the signatures of 106 of the 188 state legislators. "In a logical world, that kind of support would indicate that a bill is about to pass," said Sen. Jamie Raskin, a Montgomery County Democrat and proponent of what's affectionately known as the "Free the Grapes" campaign.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2010
Marylanders preparing for holiday parties can't order wine to be shipped to their homes, but key lawmakers are working toward making such wine-by-mail sales legal next year. Sen. Joan Carter Conway, who chairs the Senate committee that oversees the delicate issue, said there will "probably" be a bill passed to let Marylanders receive shipments of wine. Her counterpart in the House, Del. Dereck E. Davis, pledged to do "the best I can" to persuade his committee and his chamber to pass a bill.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2011
Consumer advocates pleaded with lawmakers Monday to let customers bring their own bottles of wine to restaurants in Baltimore City and three other counties, saying the state's high-end eateries want to extend the option to their clienteles. But opponents of the legislation, including the Restaurant Association of Maryland and the liquor lobby, argued Monday before the House Economic Matters Committee that the arrangement would eat into restaurant profits and generate uncertainty about liability when consumers drink too much.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2010
Marylanders preparing for holiday parties can't order wine to be shipped to their homes, but key lawmakers are working toward making such wine-by-mail sales legal next year. Sen. Joan Carter Conway, who chairs the Senate committee that oversees the delicate issue, said there will "probably" be a bill passed to let Marylanders receive shipments of wine. Her counterpart in the House, Del. Dereck E. Davis, pledged to do "the best I can" to persuade his committee and his chamber to pass a bill.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2010
Consumer advocates are worried that a study of whether to overturn Maryland's much-criticized ban on direct-to-home shipments of wine might be stained by the same alcohol interests that have blocked changes in the General Assembly for years. Wine drinkers said they were dismayed to find that they weren't invited to the first meeting last week held by the Maryland comptroller's office to study the wine-shipping issue. The study commission seems to be focused on the potential impact on liquor wholesalers and distributors, and could "overlook" consumers, said Adam Borden, former executive director of Marylanders for Better Beer and Wine Laws.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 6, 2010
As it turns out, 2010 probably won't be the vintage year for Marylanders who want to buy wine over the Internet or receive deliveries from Napa Valley. The head of a key Annapolis committee said Friday that it "will be a challenge" for his panel to endorse an end to a ban on direct wine shipments. Wine-lovers and state wineries have been pushing to overturn the prohibition for years but have been blocked by the state's powerful liquor lobby and lawmakers sympathetic to the industry.
NEWS
February 9, 2010
In this volatile political atmosphere, elected officials who act contrary to the views of voters are likely to find the electorate unforgiving this November. It is a powerful argument that Republicans have been using to great effect in Washington: Polls matter. Amazingly, Sen. Joan Carter Conway is pursuing precisely that folly with her recent disclosure that she opposes legislation to allow Marylanders to have wine shipped directly to their homes. A majority of the public clearly favors the law, and more than half the members of the General Assembly have signed on as co-sponsors of the bill.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | February 8, 2010
Most Maryland lawmakers, a swath of Democrats and Republicans from across the state, want adults to be able to have bottles of wine shipped to their homes, something that's legal in 37 other states. When it was filed last week, a bill repealing the quarter-century-old direct-shipping ban included the signatures of 106 of the 188 state legislators. "In a logical world, that kind of support would indicate that a bill is about to pass," said Sen. Jamie Raskin, a Montgomery County Democrat and proponent of what's affectionately known as the "Free the Grapes" campaign.
NEWS
February 9, 2010
In this volatile political atmosphere, elected officials who act contrary to the views of voters are likely to find the electorate unforgiving this November. It is a powerful argument that Republicans have been using to great effect in Washington: Polls matter. Amazingly, Sen. Joan Carter Conway is pursuing precisely that folly with her recent disclosure that she opposes legislation to allow Marylanders to have wine shipped directly to their homes. A majority of the public clearly favors the law, and more than half the members of the General Assembly have signed on as co-sponsors of the bill.
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