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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
On a recent Sunday afternoon, Polly Pittman clipped nets over the ripening grapes in the vineyard she hopes will ensure that one of Anne Arundel County's oldest family farms continues to have a future. "Basically, the McMansions start on the other side of these trees," Pittman said. "We think of ourselves as the last frontier of agricultural development in Anne Arundel County. " Nearly three centuries after her ancestors started tilling this hill in Davidsonville, the 550-acre Dodon Farm remains the county's largest working family farm.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
New advances in wine technology are great news for people who thrive on variety and experimentation. With more Baltimore-area restaurants adopting an array of advanced wine-dispensing systems - from kegs to devices that allow wine to be poured without removing the cork - it's easier than ever to imbibe without committing to a single bottle. These new systems have a cool factor that makes wine geeks go nuts. But the technology is for more than just show. Implementing these systems translates into more options for customers, cost savings for restaurant owners and environmental benefits for everyone.
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NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | November 3, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- As President Clinton intensifies his personal effort to win congressional approval of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), California's 52-member House delegation is a particularly critical contingent to his hopes. The White House expects to win the Nov. 17 vote in the Senate but is fighting an uphill battle in the House, where constituent interests are pulling congressmen in all directions.House veteran Democrat Robert Matsui of Sacramento, the administration's point man for NAFTA in the state, acknowledges that only six of the 30 California Democrats in the House are on record supporting NAFTA now. But he predicts 13 will be aboard eventually, along with 16 or 17 of the state's House Republicans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
Though New Year's Eve is less than a week away, even last-minute party planners have time to add a Maryland sparkling wine to their celebrations. With seven of the state's 56 wineries producing America's version of champagne, the local wine industry has a lot to offer. "Most well-made sparkling wines have a freshness imparted by the effervescence and the bright fruit," says Kevin Atticks, executive director of the Maryland Wine Association, which is based in Timonium . And besides, "Bubblies are interesting and look so nice in the glass," he says.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | February 4, 2007
It has been said that a glass of red wine each day can be good for your health. A recent congressional study says it can also be good for the nation's economic health. Winemakers and grape growers contribute more than $162 billion annually to the U.S. economy, according to a study conducted for the Congressional Wine Caucus, a group of 182 senators and representatives from states with an interest in wine. Although tiny compared with those in some states, Maryland's wine industry is growing and becoming an increasingly important part of the agricultural economy.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,Sun foreign reporter | December 10, 2007
SOMERSET WEST, South Africa -- A few years ago, Howard Booysen thought "bouquet" referred only to flowers and that the mark of a fine wine was a big, fruity flavor. Now, at 24, he is one of this country's most promising young vintners, praised for his calmness under pressure, his discerning palate and his knowledge of chemical processes so critical to turning grapes into a choice bottle of shiraz or chardonnay. Booysen has another notable quality, given South Africa's bid to redress decades of racial discrimination and the wine industry's long history as a bastion of exploitation: He isn't white.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2003
Don Segal's vineyard, with its rows of bare midwinter vines and wood and wire trellises, sits on Annapolis' Harness Creek, a quiet nook where kayaks skim over glassy water. It bears the name of Segal's yet-to-be-unveiled boutique wine. Segal's Anne Arundel County vineyard, which he hopes will be Maryland's 13th winery, is representative of the state's burgeoning grape-growing and wine-making industry, as well as a concerted effort by state officials to establish a cluster of wineries in southern counties such as Anne Arundel, Prince George's and Calvert - where tobacco was once king.
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,Special to the Sun | October 13, 2004
The upstairs room in Helen's Garden Res-taurant in Canton one Thursday eve-ning is bathed in candlelight and filled with the hum of talk, music and laughter. About a dozen women sit at tables in the art-filled nook and chat as they nibble from carefully arranged trays of hors d'oeuvres and sip glasses of rose. Welcome to the Women's Wine & Dine, a monthly event with wine tastings, a three-course gourmet meal, guest speakers and goody bags. No men are allowed. The dinners, which began in April and sell out every month, offer women the chance to learn about wine in a relaxed "sisterly" setting while raising money for an organization that helps homeless women, says Wine & Dine founder Monyka Berrocosa-Marbach, a 34-year-old food and wine consultant.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | January 19, 1997
I was about to sit down and write a column about cabernet sauvignon and merlot when I got the phone call telling me Philip Wagner was dead.Cabernet and Merlot can wait.Wagner, who died Dec. 29 at the age of 92, was a most remarkable man. It would be difficult to overstate how important a figure this Baltimore newspaperman was in the world of wine.This was a man who reinvented the wine industry in the United States east of the Rockies. He accomplished this in his spare time, while pursuing a distinguished journalistic career that ended in 1964, when he retired as editor of The Sun.Wagner was also the man who taught America how to make wine at home, inspiring generations of amateur vintners.
NEWS
May 12, 1993
Call it a vintage case of sour grapes, this tiff between the Association of Maryland Wineries and Annapolis tavern owner Jerry Hardesty.The 10 vintners in the association are stomping-mad at Mr. Hardesty for using his capital connections to win passage of a General Assembly bill allowing him to invite out-of-state wineries to his yearly beer and wine bash. The vintners say this violates the spirit of 1984 legislation that created the Maryland Wine Festival as a promotional tool for Maryland's small but reputable wine industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
Maryland Wine Week is back. The 11-day celebration of the state's wine industry begins Friday and runs through June 24. Organized by the Maryland Wineries Association, the third annual promotional event has restaurants and wine shops throughout the state offering discounts and specials in addition to a full schedule of winemaker dinners and other events featuring Maryland wine. Johnny's (4800 Roland Ave., 410-773-0777, johnnysdownstairs.com) will spotlight a different Maryland winemaker at evening wine tastings from June 18 to 23. The free tastings, which will include light snacks, are from 5 to 6 o'clock each night.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
Maryland Wine Week is back. The 11-day celebration of the state's wine industry begins Friday and runs through June 24. Organized by the Maryland Wineries Association, the third annual promotional event has restaurants and wine shops throughout the state offering discounts and specials in addition to a full schedule of winemaker dinners and other events featuring Maryland wine and winemakers. Johnny's (4800 Roland Ave., 410-773-0777, johnnysdownstairs.com) will spotlight a different Maryland winemaker at evening wine tastings from June 18 to 23. The free tastings, which will include light snacks, are from 5 to 6 o'clock each night.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | November 27, 2012
Maryland will host the fifth annual Drink Local Wine Conference. The event will be held the weekend of April 12-14 in Baltimore. Created by Washington Post wine columnist Dave McIntyre and wine blogger Jeff Siegel, a.k.a. the Wine Curmudgeon, the Drink Local Wine Conference brings attention to wine made in the 47 states and Canada that aren't California, Washington and Oregon. Maryland's wine industry is one of the fastest growing in the country, nearly doubling in size over the past two years with more than 60 wineries, according to the Maryland Wineries Association.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
On a recent Sunday afternoon, Polly Pittman clipped nets over the ripening grapes in the vineyard she hopes will ensure that one of Anne Arundel County's oldest family farms continues to have a future. "Basically, the McMansions start on the other side of these trees," Pittman said. "We think of ourselves as the last frontier of agricultural development in Anne Arundel County. " Nearly three centuries after her ancestors started tilling this hill in Davidsonville, the 550-acre Dodon Farm remains the county's largest working family farm.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2010
Marylanders preparing for holiday parties can't order wine to be shipped to their homes, but key lawmakers are working toward making such wine-by-mail sales legal next year. Sen. Joan Carter Conway, who chairs the Senate committee that oversees the delicate issue, said there will "probably" be a bill passed to let Marylanders receive shipments of wine. Her counterpart in the House, Del. Dereck E. Davis, pledged to do "the best I can" to persuade his committee and his chamber to pass a bill.
NEWS
September 7, 2009
All Mark Emon, owner of St. Michaels Winery, wanted to do was ship to a customer from New York who loved his Maryland-made wine. But since Maryland doesn't permit direct shipment of wine within the state, New York ruled this summer he could not ship out of it. The result? No sale. "This is St. Michaels. We get tourists," says Mr. Emon, who employs nine people at his Eastern Shore winery, one of the state's top five producers. "How much business do I lose? I'm asked several times a day if we can ship, whether in state or out of state.
NEWS
May 12, 1993
Call it a vintage case of sour grapes, this tiff between the Association of Maryland Wineries and Annapolis tavern owner Jerry Hardesty.The 10 vintners in the association, including three based in Mt. Airy, are stomping-mad at Mr. Hardesty for using his capital connections to win passage of a General Assembly bill allowing him to ask out-of-state wineries to his yearly beer and wine bash. The vintners say this violates the spirit of 1984 legislation that created the Maryland Wine Festival as a promotional tool for Maryland's small but reputable wine industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | November 27, 2012
Maryland will host the fifth annual Drink Local Wine Conference. The event will be held the weekend of April 12-14 in Baltimore. Created by Washington Post wine columnist Dave McIntyre and wine blogger Jeff Siegel, a.k.a. the Wine Curmudgeon, the Drink Local Wine Conference brings attention to wine made in the 47 states and Canada that aren't California, Washington and Oregon. Maryland's wine industry is one of the fastest growing in the country, nearly doubling in size over the past two years with more than 60 wineries, according to the Maryland Wineries Association.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | July 20, 2008
Here in Paris, Coca-Cola is 10 dollars a glass. A grilled cheese sandwich is 10 dollars. And gas is 10 dollars a gallon. But France still offers one good deal to Americans - and the French and everybody else. A decent bottle of wine is 2 or 3 euros - 3 dollars to 5 dollars. A great bottle can be had for 10 or 15 dollars. (I'm violating Sun style by spelling out monetary amounts, but my French keyboard doesn't have a dollar sign! At least not that I can find. It also has the letters "w" and "m" and "a" and a bunch of other stuff in the "wrong" places.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,Sun foreign reporter | December 10, 2007
SOMERSET WEST, South Africa -- A few years ago, Howard Booysen thought "bouquet" referred only to flowers and that the mark of a fine wine was a big, fruity flavor. Now, at 24, he is one of this country's most promising young vintners, praised for his calmness under pressure, his discerning palate and his knowledge of chemical processes so critical to turning grapes into a choice bottle of shiraz or chardonnay. Booysen has another notable quality, given South Africa's bid to redress decades of racial discrimination and the wine industry's long history as a bastion of exploitation: He isn't white.
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