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By ROB KASPER | December 8, 1993
Can an old tongue learn new tricks? Lately I have been trying to train my tongue to be in the best position to taste the various types of wine I throw its way.Your red Bordeaux and your California Cabernets, for instance, are supposed to land in the middle of the tongue. By landing there the tongue theoretically gets a clean shot at the fruit flavors of the red wines. Meanwhile, your Rieslings are supposed to splash down on the tip of tongue. This landing spot is where the sweet flavors of the wine are detected.
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NEWS
March 5, 2014
"Wines Around the World," a wine-tasting benefit in support of Family and Children's Services, will be held March 16, from 2 to 5 p.m. at Vandiver Inn, 301 South Union Avenue in Havre de Grace. This ninth annual event raises funds for Family and Children's Services, a nonprofit based in Bel Air that serves children, adolescents and their families who experience the effects of sexual, physical and/or emotional abuse. The nonprofit also provides school-based counseling in seven elementary schools in Harford County, general counseling and adult day care.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2005
Family The new Sports Legends at Camden Yards museum hosts its grand opening on Saturday. The venue stores and displays more than 10,000 Maryland sports artifacts. Page 14 Arts Photographer Arthur Leipzig took hundreds of images documenting the lives of ordinary New Yorkers and others around the world during the 1940s. Don't miss your chance to see these pictures at the exhibit On Assignment at University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Page 30 Scene Bjork's music and an 18-piece jazz band might seem to be an unlikely combination, but the Bjorkestra, performing tomorrow at the Ottobar, is real and ready to play.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
Sunday, Feb. 23 'Bay Day' Environmental event The Robinson Nature Center's first annual "Bay Day" will take place from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at 6692 Cedar Lane in Columbia. Event highlights the culture, history, food and natural resources of the bay through speakers, hands-on activities, film screenings and bay-themed concessions. Information: 410-313-0400 or howardcountymd.gov/rncbayday.htm. Recital Pianist David Wasser will perform a program titled, "Day on Earth," at 4 p.m. at Howard Community College's Monteabaro Recital Hall, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway in Columbia.
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler and Karen Zeiler,Contributing Writer | September 16, 1994
The 11th annual Maryland Wine Festival will open tomorrow with a bounty of fine wines and gourmet cuisine.As many as 20,000 visitors are expected to attend the annual two-day event at the Carroll County Farm Museum in Westminster. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. tomorrow and noon to 6 p.m. Sunday.Admission is $12 for those age 21 and older and includes a logo-engraved wine glass, tickets for 10 one-ounce samples of Maryland wines, attendance at the wine-tasting seminar, and self-guided tours of period craft exhibits and demonstrations.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 27, 1991
Art isn't just what you hang on a wall. It can be a vase, a plate, even a cup and saucer -- especially a cup and saucer desigend by a fine artist.Imagine a coffee cup that looks like a swirl of ribbon candy, crafted in striped black and white porcelain. Or one with handles that look like an angel's wing. Or cups that resemble flowers.These whimsical pieces are part of the Artist Collection, featuring 21 cups and saucers designed for Rosenthal, a 115-year-old German porcelain company, by artists such as Dorothy Hafner of New York and Lino Sabattini.
NEWS
September 10, 2006
The 23rd Maryland Wine Festival 2006 will be held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and noon to 6 p.m. Sept. 17 at the Carroll County Farm Museum, 500 S. Center St., Westminster. Admission is $20 for those ages 21 and older with valid identification; $5 for ages 7 to 20; and free for those ages 6 and younger with a paying adult. The adult admission includes a 2006 logo-engraved wine glass, up to 20 samples of Maryland wines and wine-education seminars. Fourteen Maryland wineries will participate with their finest vintages.
NEWS
March 5, 2014
"Wines Around the World," a wine-tasting benefit in support of Family and Children's Services, will be held March 16, from 2 to 5 p.m. at Vandiver Inn, 301 South Union Avenue in Havre de Grace. This ninth annual event raises funds for Family and Children's Services, a nonprofit based in Bel Air that serves children, adolescents and their families who experience the effects of sexual, physical and/or emotional abuse. The nonprofit also provides school-based counseling in seven elementary schools in Harford County, general counseling and adult day care.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,Contributing Writer | September 17, 1993
Carroll County will be rolling in the grapes this weekend.The 10th annual Maryland Wine Festival will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. tomorrow and from noon to 6 p.m. Sunday at the Carroll County Farm Museum in Westminster.The Farm Museum's 140 acres will be filled with activities. Tents have been set up to house wineries and artisans from all over the state, as well as food vendors. With all of the activity, the Farm Museum has had to rely on the kindness of strangers."There are so many behind-the-scenes efforts," said Dottie Freeman, the museum's administrative marketing specialist.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1997
Etiquette expert Dorothea Johnson tells the story of the businessman who came to her for help after losing out on a plum assignment.At a lunch meeting with a senior executive in the company, he sat down and immediately started eating the salad in front of him. He looked up to see his boss, who hadn't picked up his fork yet, staring at him."I knew right then they weren't going to send me out," he said.If only he had taken a dining tutorial offered by Johnson's Protocol School of Washington before his lunch, he would have known to wait until his host started eating.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | September 8, 2012
Peggy Conrad vividly recalls attending the very first Maryland Wine Festival, held in September 1984, at the Shriver Homestead in Union Mills, on a whim. "I just heard about it and thought I would check it out and see how much I liked it," said Conrad, who worked for the county government for 31 years and is now retired. "I was not a big wine drinker back then. " Suffice it to say, it turned out that Conrad enjoyed that first festival quite a bit - and also ended up developing a fondness for white wines.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | April 29, 2009
Once upon a time if you went to a restaurant that didn't have a liquor license, the owner was happy you decided to eat there anyway. The server would open the bottle of wine you brought, provide glasses and pour it for you. For no charge, of course. Then, as Baltimoreans got more wine-savvy, some were so into their cellars they would take their own bottles even to restaurants that had wine lists of their own. It made sense for these places to charge a "corkage fee," not as a penalty but to recoup some of the loss of revenue because the customer didn't buy wine from the restaurant's cellar.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER and ROB KASPER,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | April 15, 2009
Halfway through a recent wine tasting at the Gramercy Carriage House on Greenspring Valley Road, the crowd of 80 well-dressed sippers was getting loud and silly. Georg J. Riedel quickly restored order. Riedel, the 60-year-old Austrian who comes from 10 generations of glassmakers, put the drinkers through a series of exercises designed to show that wines can taste drastically different when they are served in differently shaped wineglasses. "I am here to complicate your wine drinking," said Riedel, who heads the Austrian wineglass company that bears his name.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | September 9, 2007
Art is a very subjective thing, so it is best to keep your gallery comments ambiguous, yet relevant. Wine people are experts at this sort of patter, which is why so many art openings feature wine-and-cheese receptions. The fact is, many things that can be said about wine can be said about art. For example, if you are standing in front of one of those ubiquitous vase-with-flowers paintings, you could murmur, "What a fine bouquet!" Whether you were talking about the wine in your glass or the painting on the wall, you would be entirely appropriate.
NEWS
September 10, 2006
The 23rd Maryland Wine Festival 2006 will be held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and noon to 6 p.m. Sept. 17 at the Carroll County Farm Museum, 500 S. Center St., Westminster. Admission is $20 for those ages 21 and older with valid identification; $5 for ages 7 to 20; and free for those ages 6 and younger with a paying adult. The adult admission includes a 2006 logo-engraved wine glass, up to 20 samples of Maryland wines and wine-education seminars. Fourteen Maryland wineries will participate with their finest vintages.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2005
Family The new Sports Legends at Camden Yards museum hosts its grand opening on Saturday. The venue stores and displays more than 10,000 Maryland sports artifacts. Page 14 Arts Photographer Arthur Leipzig took hundreds of images documenting the lives of ordinary New Yorkers and others around the world during the 1940s. Don't miss your chance to see these pictures at the exhibit On Assignment at University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Page 30 Scene Bjork's music and an 18-piece jazz band might seem to be an unlikely combination, but the Bjorkestra, performing tomorrow at the Ottobar, is real and ready to play.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | July 25, 1993
Johanna Jager, a 25-year-old college student from Austria touring the eastern United States, stood at a tent yesterday and sampled a chardonnay, joining thousands of others at the Mid-Atlantic Wine Festival in Annapolis."
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | April 29, 2009
Once upon a time if you went to a restaurant that didn't have a liquor license, the owner was happy you decided to eat there anyway. The server would open the bottle of wine you brought, provide glasses and pour it for you. For no charge, of course. Then, as Baltimoreans got more wine-savvy, some were so into their cellars they would take their own bottles even to restaurants that had wine lists of their own. It made sense for these places to charge a "corkage fee," not as a penalty but to recoup some of the loss of revenue because the customer didn't buy wine from the restaurant's cellar.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 14, 2004
A few years ago if you had told me Cambridge would be a vacation destination for Baltimoreans, I would have laughed. It was just a town to drive through on the way to Ocean City. With the opening of the Hyatt Chesapeake Bay resort 18 months ago, all that changed. Tourists arrived in droves who were willing to spend -- even used to spending -- $50 a person for dinner. One of the beneficiaries was the Canvasback, Cambridge's fine dining restaurant. (It's also a sometimes raucous pub with live blues performances, which makes for an interesting combination.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1997
Etiquette expert Dorothea Johnson tells the story of the businessman who came to her for help after losing out on a plum assignment.At a lunch meeting with a senior executive in the company, he sat down and immediately started eating the salad in front of him. He looked up to see his boss, who hadn't picked up his fork yet, staring at him."I knew right then they weren't going to send me out," he said.If only he had taken a dining tutorial offered by Johnson's Protocol School of Washington before his lunch, he would have known to wait until his host started eating.
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