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NEWS
December 30, 1990
From: Marvin SandsChairmanCanandaigua Wine Co. Inc.Your newspaper recently published a column by Huntley J. Cross, director of the Anne Arundel County Drug and Alcohol Program, which included blatantly false and misleading information about our product, Cisco.Mr. Cross's article not only wrongly links the death of a California teen-ager to Cisco, it also claims our product is "known on the street as 'liquid crack.' "The coroner's report on the tragic death of a California teen-ager last August established the young man's blood alcohol content was 0.04 last -- less than half the legal minimum for intoxication in most states.
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FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home | December 18, 2010
With the holiday entertaining season in full swing, you may find yourself lacking a dedicated space for mixing up and serving the latest cocktail. For some, a box of spirits and a six-pack in the fridge might be enough, but for large-scale entertaining, a home bar may be the answer — particularly if you are trying to get your guests out of the kitchen. Bar styles and options are as varied as those for sofas. Victorian, deco, urban contemporary, rustic, wood, metal, glass — whatever look you're trying to achieve, a custom cabinetry specialist can build you a bar to the dimensions and specifications you desire.
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NEWS
December 18, 1991
Sixteen students from at least three Baltimore schools were arrested yesterday for breaking into railroad cars and stealing cases of wine and wine coolers, according to police.Officer Robert L. Jenkins of the Southern Police District said the youths -- 12 to 16 years old -- broke into the boxcars before school and hid most of the cases of wine and wine coolers.Twenty-eight cases have been recovered so far. Railroad police are conducting an inventory to see how many cases were taken from the railroad cars.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 24, 1993
The luncheon salad was green, crunchy with strips of beet. The luncheon chardonnay, a 1990 BV Caneros Reserve, was perfect. And the main speaker, Dr. Dimitrios Trichopoulos, chairman of the department of epidemiology at Harvard University's School of Public Health, was reassuring. He said drinking moderate amounts of wine, white or red, had more health benefits than risks for healthy adults.It was a fitting way to kick off Wine Appreciation Week, Feb. 21-27.But amid the chardonnay sipping and salad crunching at the National Press Club gathering, there was talk of "sin" and "new taxes."
NEWS
By Huntley J. Cross | January 6, 1991
I would very much appreciate the opportunity to respond to Marvin Sands, chairman, Canandaigua Wine Co. Inc., and his letter of Dec. 30.Let me begin by stating that I am in complete agreement with what Sands stated in the last paragraph of his letter: "We believe that public officials are responsible for providing correct, verified information to the public."I agree wholeheartedly with Sands because that is exactly what I did in regard to Cisco. I provided no blatantly false nor misleading information about the product Cisco.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe | June 16, 1992
Q: Our daughter is graduating from high school this month and she is planning a party at our home for many of her friends. Since this is a special occasion, she wants to serve alcohol. We know they'll wind up drinking somewhere, so we wonder whether it wouldn't be better to let her friends drink at our house where we can monitor them and confine the alcohol to beer and wine coolers rather than hard liquor. What do you think?A: Maryland law is quite clear in this regard: Serving alcohol to individuals under the age of 21 is illegal, regardless of where it occurs.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff writer | December 1, 1991
County middle and high school students are far more likely to use alcohol or tobacco than illegal drugs such as marijuana, cocaine or hallucinogens, a statewide survey shows.Nearly one in five says Mom and Dad probably wouldn't say anything if they knew about the drinking, while 16 percent say they probably wouldn't get in trouble with their parents for smoking cigarettes.The statewide survey, conducted last December, asked students about their use of alcohol and drugs during the previous 30 days.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 24, 1993
The luncheon salad was green, crunchy with strips of beet. The luncheon chardonnay, a 1990 BV Caneros Reserve, was perfect. And the main speaker, Dr. Dimitrios Trichopoulos, chairman of the department of epidemiology at Harvard University's School of Public Health, was reassuring. He said drinking moderate amounts of wine, white or red, had more health benefits than risks for healthy adults.It was a fitting way to kick off Wine Appreciation Week, Feb. 21-27.But amid the chardonnay sipping and salad crunching at the National Press Club gathering, there was talk of "sin" and "new taxes."
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home | December 18, 2010
With the holiday entertaining season in full swing, you may find yourself lacking a dedicated space for mixing up and serving the latest cocktail. For some, a box of spirits and a six-pack in the fridge might be enough, but for large-scale entertaining, a home bar may be the answer — particularly if you are trying to get your guests out of the kitchen. Bar styles and options are as varied as those for sofas. Victorian, deco, urban contemporary, rustic, wood, metal, glass — whatever look you're trying to achieve, a custom cabinetry specialist can build you a bar to the dimensions and specifications you desire.
NEWS
By Huntley J. Cross | November 25, 1990
There is a product that can be found in many Anne Arundel County liquor stores that I believe is dangerous and a threat to anyone who mistakes it for a wine cooler.This product is a fortified wine, which has a labeled alcohol content of 20 percent by volume (40 proof). Wine coolers have an alcohol content that ranges from 4 percent to 7 percent. Regular table wines average about 12 percent alcohol.Fortified wine, or "Cisco," comes in five flavors: red, peach, orange, berry and gold. It is bottled in two sizes: 375 and 750 milliliters.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe | June 16, 1992
Q: Our daughter is graduating from high school this month and she is planning a party at our home for many of her friends. Since this is a special occasion, she wants to serve alcohol. We know they'll wind up drinking somewhere, so we wonder whether it wouldn't be better to let her friends drink at our house where we can monitor them and confine the alcohol to beer and wine coolers rather than hard liquor. What do you think?A: Maryland law is quite clear in this regard: Serving alcohol to individuals under the age of 21 is illegal, regardless of where it occurs.
NEWS
December 18, 1991
Sixteen students from at least three Baltimore schools were arrested yesterday for breaking into railroad cars and stealing cases of wine and wine coolers, according to police.Officer Robert L. Jenkins of the Southern Police District said the youths -- 12 to 16 years old -- broke into the boxcars before school and hid most of the cases of wine and wine coolers.Twenty-eight cases have been recovered so far. Railroad police are conducting an inventory to see how many cases were taken from the railroad cars.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff writer | December 1, 1991
County middle and high school students are far more likely to use alcohol or tobacco than illegal drugs such as marijuana, cocaine or hallucinogens, a statewide survey shows.Nearly one in five says Mom and Dad probably wouldn't say anything if they knew about the drinking, while 16 percent say they probably wouldn't get in trouble with their parents for smoking cigarettes.The statewide survey, conducted last December, asked students about their use of alcohol and drugs during the previous 30 days.
NEWS
By Huntley J. Cross | January 6, 1991
I would very much appreciate the opportunity to respond to Marvin Sands, chairman, Canandaigua Wine Co. Inc., and his letter of Dec. 30.Let me begin by stating that I am in complete agreement with what Sands stated in the last paragraph of his letter: "We believe that public officials are responsible for providing correct, verified information to the public."I agree wholeheartedly with Sands because that is exactly what I did in regard to Cisco. I provided no blatantly false nor misleading information about the product Cisco.
NEWS
December 30, 1990
From: Marvin SandsChairmanCanandaigua Wine Co. Inc.Your newspaper recently published a column by Huntley J. Cross, director of the Anne Arundel County Drug and Alcohol Program, which included blatantly false and misleading information about our product, Cisco.Mr. Cross's article not only wrongly links the death of a California teen-ager to Cisco, it also claims our product is "known on the street as 'liquid crack.' "The coroner's report on the tragic death of a California teen-ager last August established the young man's blood alcohol content was 0.04 last -- less than half the legal minimum for intoxication in most states.
NEWS
March 27, 2008
Hal Riney, 75 Advertising copywriter, executive Hal Riney, the iconoclastic copywriter who helped build San Francisco into a creative center for advertising with low-key, upbeat campaigns for Saturn cars, Bartles & Jaymes wine coolers and the re-election of President Ronald Reagan, died this week at his home in San Francisco. The cause was cancer, said his wife, Elizabeth Sutherland Riney. Mr. Riney spent almost 50 years in advertising, all in San Francisco, in a career arc that began in a mailroom and ended with him as chairman and chief executive of his own agency.
NEWS
August 15, 1991
"I'd hate to think that this was for nothing. I want kids to come to the viewing, if I can handle an open casket, and look and touch the cold skin of my son and know that it could have been them."The poignant anguish of Brian Ball's mother is easy to comprehend and remarkably insightful for so harsh a situation, the unexpected death of her son at age 15 of alcohol poisoning. He'd drunk 26 shots of hard liquor bought at a drinking party for teen-agers, unattended by adults, in a private house outside of Salisbury.
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