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By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2011
The publisher of The Wine Advocate said Monday he had embarked on a no-holds-barred investigation into an alleged payola scandal involving one of the publication's top critics. The Wine Advocate, an influential journal run out of Baltimore County by Robert M. Parker Jr., has been under the shadow of the scandal for the past week, ever since a London blogger alleged that Baltimore reviewer Jay Miller and his representative in Spain asked wineries for money in exchange for a visit from Miller.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2012
Nearly 35 years after founding Wine Advocate, Robert M. Parker Jr. shocked wine enthusiasts this week with his announcement that he was stepping down as editor in chief of the the seminal newsletter he ran from his Maryland home. Parker posted on the Wine Advocate website Sunday that he had brought in a new investment group and was handing over the reins to Lisa Perrotti-Brown, a master of wine and reviewer for Parker, who will run the publication from Singapore, where the Wine Advocate would establish a second office.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2012
Nearly 35 years after founding Wine Advocate, Robert M. Parker Jr. shocked wine enthusiasts this week with his announcement that he was stepping down as editor in chief of the the seminal newsletter he ran from his Maryland home. Parker posted on the Wine Advocate website Sunday that he had brought in a new investment group and was handing over the reins to Lisa Perrotti-Brown, a master of wine and reviewer for Parker, who will run the publication from Singapore, where the Wine Advocate would establish a second office.
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By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2011
The publisher of The Wine Advocate said Monday he had embarked on a no-holds-barred investigation into an alleged payola scandal involving one of the publication's top critics. The Wine Advocate, an influential journal run out of Baltimore County by Robert M. Parker Jr., has been under the shadow of the scandal for the past week, ever since a London blogger alleged that Baltimore reviewer Jay Miller and his representative in Spain asked wineries for money in exchange for a visit from Miller.
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By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2011
The Spain-based representative for an influential Baltimore wine reviewer defended himself Wednesday amid accusations that he asked wineries for money in exchange for a visit from the critic. The wine world has buzzed for days over news that respected oenophile Jay Miller, former co-owner of Bin 604 in Harbor East, had resigned from The Wine Advocate after accusations that his Spanish contact had strong-armed payments from local wineries in exchange for his visits. But Pancho Campo, president of a Spanish wine organization called The Wine Academy, told The Baltimore Sun on Wednesday that neither he nor Miller ever took money from a winery.
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By Michael Dresser | October 25, 1992
French wines run out of luckFrance's good luck, which culminated in three great vintages from 1988 to 1990, has apparently come to an end.According to Robert M. Parker Jr., publisher of the Wine Advocate, the 1992 vintage ended with "major problems in a lot of viticultural areas of France."Storms brought flooding to much of the south of the country at harvest time, he noted during a talk at the American Heart Association's Fine Wine Auction Oct. 4.In Bordeaux, the rains followed a summer plagued by high humidity and rampant rot."
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By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper , rob.kasper@baltsun.com | December 9, 2009
I went to liquor stores looking for bargains, well-reviewed wines that cost less than $25. This can be a frustrating endeavor. So many times I have hunted for wines, carrying clippings of the glowing review in my hands, only to be unable to find the bottles that the critics had praised. But this time, thanks to Jay Miller, I bagged the bargains. The $15 Chateau Ste. Michelle Indian Wells Chardonnay 2007, the $10 Milton Park Shiraz from Australia, the Finca Sobreno from Spain for $15 and the $20 Lange Pinot Noir 2007 from Oregon.
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By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 19, 2004
CANNES, France -- He was born in Baltimore, became a lawyer, and now lives comfortably in the Maryland countryside with bulldogs and a bloodhound named J. Edgar Hoover. But his reviews in the Wine Advocate can alter the price of wine around the world. Is Robert Parker too influential? Jonathan Nossiter's new documentary, Mondovino, which premiered this week at the Cannes Film Festival, leans that way. For the film, Nossiter journeys across three continents examining the struggles of the wine world's stars, supporting players and hangers-on.
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By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2001
When Robert Parker spits, the world listens. Or so they say in the wine world. That's because the affable 53-year-old lawyer from Monkton essentially determines whether a wine will fly off the shelves or sit there until it rots. And he can do that in about 20 seconds, with a swirling swish of his tongue. Vintners fear Parker. Some dislike him, especially some in the Bordeaux region of France, where they have been making wine (and big profits) the same way forever; once, in a fit of Gallic pique, a Bordelaise winemaker unleashed a fierce schnauzer on him. Right now, many are busy reacting to the new issue of his bimonthly mag, the Wine Advocate, which came out last week.
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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Wine Critic | February 2, 2000
The people who make what's in and what's out lists seemed to be down on merlot this past New Year's. That might just be a good thing for the wine and the people who drink it. Merlot is unquestionably one of the world's great red wine grapes, but its growth in popularity since it began taking root in California's wine industry has far outstripped its development in quality. Yes, it's relatively easy to pronounce, though many devotees still manage to butcher it. (It's mare-LOW.) Yes, it tends to be softer in texture than cabernet sauvignon, though there are quite a few hard-as-nails, user-unfriendly merlots on the market.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2011
The Spain-based representative for an influential Baltimore wine reviewer defended himself Wednesday amid accusations that he asked wineries for money in exchange for a visit from the critic. The wine world has buzzed for days over news that respected oenophile Jay Miller, former co-owner of Bin 604 in Harbor East, had resigned from The Wine Advocate after accusations that his Spanish contact had strong-armed payments from local wineries in exchange for his visits. But Pancho Campo, president of a Spanish wine organization called The Wine Academy, told The Baltimore Sun on Wednesday that neither he nor Miller ever took money from a winery.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper , rob.kasper@baltsun.com | December 9, 2009
I went to liquor stores looking for bargains, well-reviewed wines that cost less than $25. This can be a frustrating endeavor. So many times I have hunted for wines, carrying clippings of the glowing review in my hands, only to be unable to find the bottles that the critics had praised. But this time, thanks to Jay Miller, I bagged the bargains. The $15 Chateau Ste. Michelle Indian Wells Chardonnay 2007, the $10 Milton Park Shiraz from Australia, the Finca Sobreno from Spain for $15 and the $20 Lange Pinot Noir 2007 from Oregon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,Sun Staff | July 24, 2005
BIOGRAPHY THE EMPEROR OF WINE: THE RISE OF ROBERT M. PARKER JR. AND THE REIGN OF AMERICAN TASTE By Elin McCoy. Ecco. 304 pages. Taste memory is a talent and wine critic Robert M. Parker Jr. has it in magnums. In a mere minute, he is able to judge a wine, swirling it, sniffing it and holding it in his mouth before unceremoniously spitting it out. Moreover, Parker can mentally compare the wine in front of him with all the other wines of the same type he has tasted over the years. This ability to remember wines he has rated is, biographer Elin McCoy says, Parker's "secret weapon."
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 19, 2004
CANNES, France -- He was born in Baltimore, became a lawyer, and now lives comfortably in the Maryland countryside with bulldogs and a bloodhound named J. Edgar Hoover. But his reviews in the Wine Advocate can alter the price of wine around the world. Is Robert Parker too influential? Jonathan Nossiter's new documentary, Mondovino, which premiered this week at the Cannes Film Festival, leans that way. For the film, Nossiter journeys across three continents examining the struggles of the wine world's stars, supporting players and hangers-on.
FEATURES
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2001
When Robert Parker spits, the world listens. Or so they say in the wine world. That's because the affable 53-year-old lawyer from Monkton essentially determines whether a wine will fly off the shelves or sit there until it rots. And he can do that in about 20 seconds, with a swirling swish of his tongue. Vintners fear Parker. Some dislike him, especially some in the Bordeaux region of France, where they have been making wine (and big profits) the same way forever; once, in a fit of Gallic pique, a Bordelaise winemaker unleashed a fierce schnauzer on him. Right now, many are busy reacting to the new issue of his bimonthly mag, the Wine Advocate, which came out last week.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Wine Critic | February 2, 2000
The people who make what's in and what's out lists seemed to be down on merlot this past New Year's. That might just be a good thing for the wine and the people who drink it. Merlot is unquestionably one of the world's great red wine grapes, but its growth in popularity since it began taking root in California's wine industry has far outstripped its development in quality. Yes, it's relatively easy to pronounce, though many devotees still manage to butcher it. (It's mare-LOW.) Yes, it tends to be softer in texture than cabernet sauvignon, though there are quite a few hard-as-nails, user-unfriendly merlots on the market.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,Sun Staff | July 24, 2005
BIOGRAPHY THE EMPEROR OF WINE: THE RISE OF ROBERT M. PARKER JR. AND THE REIGN OF AMERICAN TASTE By Elin McCoy. Ecco. 304 pages. Taste memory is a talent and wine critic Robert M. Parker Jr. has it in magnums. In a mere minute, he is able to judge a wine, swirling it, sniffing it and holding it in his mouth before unceremoniously spitting it out. Moreover, Parker can mentally compare the wine in front of him with all the other wines of the same type he has tasted over the years. This ability to remember wines he has rated is, biographer Elin McCoy says, Parker's "secret weapon."
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | October 25, 1992
French wines run out of luckFrance's good luck, which culminated in three great vintages from 1988 to 1990, has apparently come to an end.According to Robert M. Parker Jr., publisher of the Wine Advocate, the 1992 vintage ended with "major problems in a lot of viticultural areas of France."Storms brought flooding to much of the south of the country at harvest time, he noted during a talk at the American Heart Association's Fine Wine Auction Oct. 4.In Bordeaux, the rains followed a summer plagued by high humidity and rampant rot."
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