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By Jane Wingle and Jane Wingle,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 7, 1997
"Make no little plans."Daniel H. Burnham, noted architect and city planner, took his words literally and grandly exemplified them in his famous Chicago Plan of 1909.The Windy City continues to reap the benefits of his vision. Visitors and natives alike experience his foresight and architectural inventiveness, along with scores of other magnificent towering structures, on a sightseeing cruise aboard Chicago's First Lady.Sponsored by the city's Architecture Foundation, the excursion is led by well-informed docents, as the boat, displaying the flair of a 1920s presidential yacht, meanders the Chicago River.
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EXPLORE
By Carolyn Kelemen | September 21, 2011
Ever since it opened on Broadway in 1975, "Chicago, the Musical" has brought the Windy City's scandalous ways to a new generation of theater-goers. Now through early November, we can do a little more time on the women's block of the Cook County jail with the likes of Roxie Hart, Velma Kelly and other jazz-era murderesses doing the "Cell Block Tango" right here at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Columbia. Forget for a moment the immorality of murder or whether you buy the ladies' excuses that their unfaithful hubbies and boyfriends "had it coming.
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NEWS
By Eric Slater and Eric Slater,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 2003
CHICAGO - A man who was fired from his job at an auto parts company six months ago returned yesterday with a handgun and shot six former co-workers, killing them all, before being mortally wounded in a gunbattle with police, authorities said. Salvador Tapia, 36, who had been arrested a dozen times on weapons, assault and other charges, died after being taken to a hospital, police said. Four of his victims were pronounced dead at the scene, shot down among a maze of engine parts, crates and 55-gallon drums at Windy City Core Supply Inc. The two others died at local hospitals, officials said.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2011
They're the city with wind, we're the city with charm. They have Daleys, we have D'Alesandros. Their stories are told by David Mamet, ours by David Simon. And now, Andrés Alonso may have to choose one over the other. The Baltimore schools chief is on a short list for the same post in Chicago, according to the Chicago Tribune, which is owned by the same company as The Baltimore Sun. And, adding to all this delightful inbreeding, I have something of a dual citizenship in both cities — born here, raised there, came back here almost 24 years ago to work at The Sun. So allow me to offer some unsolicited advice to Dr. A, should he be weighing one city against the other.
NEWS
April 19, 1992
Could downtown Baltimore suddenly be flooded the way Chicago was this past week? No, says the city's public works czar, George Balog, and recent history seems to prove him right. Yet an aging city like Baltimore must constantly watch its infrastructure to prevent unforeseen disasters.The flooding that paralyzed much of Chicago's business area was caused by a car-sized hole in the concrete bed of the Chicago River. Hundreds of millions of gallons of water suddenly filled a network of underground tunnels originally used to transport freight and coal to different Loop buildings.
TRAVEL
May 6, 2001
Road Shows In search of America's 10 best roadside attractions John Margolies, author of "Fun Along the Road: American Tourist Attractions," has spent nearly a quarter-century touring and photographing America's roadside wonders. So, when American Heritage magazine asked him for a list of the 10 best, he balked. Ten is an awfully small number. But then Margolies buckled down and came up with these in the interest of "geographical diversity": * Trees of Mystery, Klamath, Calif.: A forest of ancient redwoods guarded by the largest statues of Paul Bunyan and his ox Babe in the United States.
FEATURES
By Mike Gluck | May 7, 1995
I started living in Baltimore by default. I figured that going to Johns Hopkins University was as good an excuse as any to live in a place once known as Mobtown, a city where everyone knows your name, as long as it's "Hon."That was nearly four years ago. Now that I'm about to graduate, it's time to move on. And while I don't mind leaving Hopkins, I'd rather not say goodbye to Baltimore.The problem is that I'm addicted. Hooked. I can't sing the national anthem without screaming "O!" in the middle of it. I've become accustomed to a nighttime sky that never gets completely black, just darker shades of orange.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | October 21, 1993
A conservative estimate is that if the NFL had been in charge of the Normandy Invasion, D-Day wouldn't have been until the 7th of June . . . 1952.This never-ending soap opera, which supposedly arrives at its final episode next Tuesday in the Windy City (an apt place), has been raging since, what, the Reagan administration?In any case, it has been quite a while since the league commissioner said in all apparent sincerity, "I wouldn't expect another city to be added this week, but the expansion committee will explore additional expansion.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | January 25, 2004
On a certain level, Scott Skiles knew what he was getting into when he took over as Chicago Bulls coach after Bill Cartwright was fired in late November. The Bulls, as constituted, are a weird amalgam of the very young (Tyson Chandler and Eddy Curry) and the graying before your eyes (Scottie Pippen and Antonio Davis). But Skiles may not have realized just how difficult it will be to change the culture of losing that has festered around the United Center in the six seasons since the Bulls last raised a championship banner.
FEATURES
By Sarah Schaffer | November 8, 2003
Stormy weather was relentless Thursday evening, but it didn't dampen the mood at Greg Otto's art opening. The reception, held at the American Institute of Architects, was packed with folks trying to get a peek at the local artist's depiction of Chicago. For Otto, 60, a Roland Park painter who normally creates architectural scenes of Baltimore, the success was a shock and a thrill. "Even though the weather was not good, the people just made a tremendous effort to get there. And it was one of those occasions where people were really responding to and talking about [the work]
SPORTS
By The New York Times | August 16, 2008
QINGDAO, China - The Chinese do not have much of a tradition of yacht clubs or sailing centers, so for the Olympics they built one from scratch in a former shipyard in this port on the Yellow Sea. Qingdao, where all the Olympic sailing races are taking place, is not a quaint seaside village. It is the Hartford, Conn., of China, a major insurance center, with a population of some 7.5 million. There are traffic jams, glass office towers that light up at night, and thousands of the gray high-rise apartment blocks that sprout up overnight in China, like mushrooms.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2005
The Orioles' once-promising season is beginning to dissolve in a raft of defeats. The Chicago White Sox, the team with the best record in baseball, dealt the skidding Orioles another blow Friday night before a Camden Yards sellout of 45,267. They rode key home runs by Paul Konerko and Carl Everett to a 7-2 victory that was essentially decided after Konerko's three-run blast in the third inning off a laboring Erik Bedard. It was the 23rd home run for Konerko, who is batting .386 during his past 16 games.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2005
MESA, Ariz. -- Jerry Hairston knew last summer that he would probably be playing elsewhere this season. From the moment Brian Roberts returned from the injured list and Hairston was moved from second base to the outfield, Hairston figured that his days as an Oriole were numbered. When he was finally traded in early February to the Chicago Cubs in the deal that sent Sammy Sosa to the Orioles, Hairston looked at it as a chance to play regularly in the city in which he grew up. It's one of baseball's oddities that Hairston is so comfortable putting on the uniform of a team he usually rooted against as a kid. Asked last month if it seemed strange to him to be a Cub when he grew up a White Sox fan, Hairston smiled.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2004
MAYOR Martin O'Malley is so intrigued by the education system in Chicago that he has scheduled a fact-finding trip to the Windy City this month. He'll find a school system that underwent considerable reform in the late 1990s under the direction of Paul G. Vallas, the city's former budget director appointed schools chief in 1995 by Mayor Richard M. Daley. In five years, until Vallas fell out of favor at City Hall and resigned, he eliminated deficits in the system's $3.5 billion budget, raised test scores (which then leveled)
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | January 25, 2004
On a certain level, Scott Skiles knew what he was getting into when he took over as Chicago Bulls coach after Bill Cartwright was fired in late November. The Bulls, as constituted, are a weird amalgam of the very young (Tyson Chandler and Eddy Curry) and the graying before your eyes (Scottie Pippen and Antonio Davis). But Skiles may not have realized just how difficult it will be to change the culture of losing that has festered around the United Center in the six seasons since the Bulls last raised a championship banner.
FEATURES
By Sarah Schaffer | November 8, 2003
Stormy weather was relentless Thursday evening, but it didn't dampen the mood at Greg Otto's art opening. The reception, held at the American Institute of Architects, was packed with folks trying to get a peek at the local artist's depiction of Chicago. For Otto, 60, a Roland Park painter who normally creates architectural scenes of Baltimore, the success was a shock and a thrill. "Even though the weather was not good, the people just made a tremendous effort to get there. And it was one of those occasions where people were really responding to and talking about [the work]
SPORTS
By Andrew Gottesman and Mark Caro and Andrew Gottesman and Mark Caro,Chicago Tribune | March 10, 1995
CHICAGO -- The Beatles wouldn't spark excitement like this, even if they played a comeback concert. Ross Perot's decision to pursue the presidency looks like a footnote by comparison.Only one man could arouse the frenzy that permeated Chicago yesterday: Michael Jordan. Only he could do all of these things:* Prompt bookmakers in Las Vegas to drastically improve the odds that a .500 team would win the NBA championship.* Cause sportscasters to interrupt programs for special reports and send talk radio into a tizzy.
EXPLORE
By Carolyn Kelemen | September 21, 2011
Ever since it opened on Broadway in 1975, "Chicago, the Musical" has brought the Windy City's scandalous ways to a new generation of theater-goers. Now through early November, we can do a little more time on the women's block of the Cook County jail with the likes of Roxie Hart, Velma Kelly and other jazz-era murderesses doing the "Cell Block Tango" right here at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Columbia. Forget for a moment the immorality of murder or whether you buy the ladies' excuses that their unfaithful hubbies and boyfriends "had it coming.
NEWS
By Eric Slater and Eric Slater,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 2003
CHICAGO - A man who was fired from his job at an auto parts company six months ago returned yesterday with a handgun and shot six former co-workers, killing them all, before being mortally wounded in a gunbattle with police, authorities said. Salvador Tapia, 36, who had been arrested a dozen times on weapons, assault and other charges, died after being taken to a hospital, police said. Four of his victims were pronounced dead at the scene, shot down among a maze of engine parts, crates and 55-gallon drums at Windy City Core Supply Inc. The two others died at local hospitals, officials said.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2002
CHICAGO - By the time yesterday's game at the United Center ended, Michael Jordan felt the weight of the statue in his likeness had been lifted from his shoulders. Certainly, coming back to that same old place, sweet home Chicago, for the first time in his 13-year career as an opponent, took an emotional toll on Jordan, one that was obvious from the time he was announced in the starting lineup to his embrace of longtime Bulls announcer Johnny "Red" Kerr at the end of the game. Luckily, Jordan's Washington Wizards teammates were able to take up the slack on the floor, as they managed a 77-69 victory that defines the word "ugly."
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