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NEWS
By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | November 29, 1993
Nine years ago, the U.S. Naval Academy had neither a windsurfing program nor a racing team. Now, it has six national championships and a reputation as one of the best windsurfing race teams in the country, thanks largely to a transplanted 54-year-old Scotsman.James Coutts had been running his own windsurfing school in Scotland, developing an international reputation, when in 1984 he took up Navy brass on their invitation to create and coach a windsurfing team at the academy.Since then, he has been drilling the midshipmen on the necessity for preparation and perfection.
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SPORTS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2012
First, the spot she won on the Olympic team for the Beijing Games was taken away and given to a competitor. Then, after making this year's team, she learned her sport would be dropped from the Games after London. Somehow, Farrah Hall, the sole American woman in the upcoming Olympic RS:X windsurfing competition, always finds herself fighting her sport as much as her competition. And yet, if there's anything the 30-year-old Annapolis native knows how to do, it's navigating rough waters.
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NEWS
By Nick Anderson and Nick Anderson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - Amid this week's campaign clashes over the U.S. mission in Iraq and chilling reports of beheadings of American civilians, President Bush turned yesterday to a novel image to attack Sen. John F. Kerry: windsurfing. In a 30-second advertisement to make its debut today, Bush lampoons one of his Democratic challenger's favorite pastimes while attacking him as indecisive on Iraq and other matters. The spot includes footage of Kerry windsurfing in waters off Nantucket Island, edited to show the Massachusetts Democrat tacking back and forth to the strains of the "Blue Danube Waltz" by Johann Strauss.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2012
Farrah Hall spends most of her life traveling around the world, windsurfing. The pictures and other images she posts on her Facebook page from places like Australia and the south of France seem pretty glamorous, but the reality for the 30-year-old Hall is not. "It's something that you really have to want to do," Hall said, sitting recently in the Annapolis office of her main sponsor, Compass Marketing. Hall, who grew up as a recreational sailor in nearby Cape St. Claire and competed in a variety of sports at Broadneck, has aspired to become an Olympic windsurfer ever since she met Mike Gebhardt, a two-time medalist, when he was putting on a clinic while she was attending St. Mary's College.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Staff Writer | July 15, 1992
Scott Steele was on his parents' sailboat during a Wednesday night race off Annapolis in 1976 when his attention was momentarily diverted."There was a guy on a wind surfer," Steele said, "going twice as fast as we were in a large sailboat."Intrigued, Steele said he and his older brother Ron tracked down the windsurfer, who happened to be Ken Winner, then the national champion. Ron bought a board from Winner, learned to sail it and then taught Scott.Two years later, Scott Steele entered his first competition.
SPORTS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2000
You have seen them skipping the waves, somersaulting their boards, and sending up wakes like speed boats. They are windsurfers, sailors who get the maximum out of the wind with the minimum amount of board and sail. And this week, for the first time, the U.S. Open National Windsurfing championships come to Chesapeake Bay. The races were to have been held in Martha's Vineyard, but a last-minute logistical problem led to their transfer to Solomons, in Southern Maryland. "It's definitely been a handful," said Alan Bernau, president of the 75-member Southern Maryland Windsurfing Association, who has had six weeks to organize the championships here.
SPORTS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2000
SOLOMONS - Australian Phil McGain, fifth ranked in the world, took the U.S. Windsurfing Open national championship on the Chesapeake Bay here yesterday. After eight races over four days off Drum Point, McGain finished narrowly ahead of another windsurfing professional, Jimmy Diaz, from the Virgin Islands, but left 17 amateur sailors far behind. "You don't expect them to be close," said McGain, who was the Professional Board Sailing Association's world racing champion in 1989, taking the open championship for the third time.
NEWS
March 5, 1991
AAU basketball tourneyThe Maryland Amateur Athletic Union invites county teams to participate in the Maryland Association AAU/Carrier Basketball Tournament on March 23 at the New Community College of Baltimore.The boys double-elimination tournament will offer competition in the 19, 17, 16, 15, 14, 13, 12, 11 and 10-and-under age brackets.Entry fees are $110 per team, $8 per player for AAU membership. Application and fees must be received by March 13.Send them to Mel Parker, Director of Maryland State AAU, 1268 Dunbar Ave. Annapolis.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2000
Heeding the call to "raft up," the kayakers draw near to share the moment they've all been waiting for. Their vessels - red, yellow, green, colorful in a kindergarten sort of way - bob and sway beneath stunning lavender clouds. The sun sinks from view. "I don't think I've seen water reflect the pinkness of the sky like that," says Barbara Miller, a speech pathologist who spent a recent Saturday evening on the waters of eastern Baltimore County for a two-mile, two-hour tour. She savors one last taste of a horizon washed in fuchsia, then turns to paddle back to shore.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 28, 2005
WHAT IF GIDGET and Moondoggie got married and moved to Maryland? They'd most likely be hanging out on the shores of Gunpowder Falls State Park having fun, fun, fun windsurfing with the kids of BABA. But, you say, these days Gidget would be a suburban matron with a job and young ones and responsibilities and an AARP card in the mail. Well, then, she'd fit right in at the Baltimore Area Boardsurfing Association. With 120 members, average age 45, the club has nearly as many whitecaps as the Chesapeake Bay on a fall day. The senior member, Bob Catzen, is 76. BABA ranks up there on the senior circuit in other ways, too. As one of the oldest (and largest)
SPORTS
Sports Digest | December 17, 2011
Sailing Windsurfer Hall nominated for Olympics Windsurfer Farrah Hall , who grew up in Annapolis, is one of five athletes nominated to the 2012 U.S. Olympic sailing team. Hall, the top-ranked women's RS:X windsurfer in the United States, was selected after the ISAF Sailing World Championships in Perth, Australia. "I'm so happy to make it onto the U.S. Olympic team," said Hall, who sailed collegiately at St. Mary's. Varsity soccer Zinkand named coach at Calvert Hall Calvert Hall has named Rich Zinkand , a 1987 graduate and a member of the school's English department, as its new varsity soccer coach.
NEWS
By Michael Catalini, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2010
Another article in a series about the people and the jobs that define a Maryland summer. Hal Ashman remembers the day his connection to watersport took hold. He was in college, spending a summer in Ocean City, and found himself on the shores of Assawoman Bay one evening with wind whipping around him and a windsurfing board at his feet. Having never taken a lesson, he mounted the board and grabbed the sail. "It was pure luck. Somehow I stood in the right place, held the equipment in the right way — and the wind was blowing like crazy — and all of a sudden, things just started working," said Ashman, now 49. "I was flying along the water on the windsurfer with really no experience ... and I knew I was getting hooked."
SPORTS
By Rick Maese and Rick Maese,Sun reporter | May 24, 2008
Farrah Hall's Olympic dream will have to wait at least four years. The Annapolis windsurfer's final plea before a federal arbitrator was dismissed after nearly two days of testimony. The ruling means that Florida windsurfer Nancy Rios, and not Hall, will represent the United States in the RS:X women's event at the Summer Games in Beijing. "My heart goes out to Farrah Hall, who put her heart and soul into making the Olympic team. She has a bright future in our sport," said Dean Brenner, chairman of US Sailing's Olympic Committee.
SPORTS
By Rick Maese and Rick Maese,Sun reporter | April 16, 2008
Annapolis windsurfer Farrah Hall and her Olympic dream might be nearing a third and final strike. A race jury denied her appeal yesterday, reaffirming its initial ruling that sends Florida windsurfer Nancy Rios to the Summer Games in China and leaves Hall at home. "I am disillusioned and bitterly disappointed with the committee's actions," Hall said in a statement released yesterday afternoon. Hall's protest over the results from the Olympic trials and an earlier jury decision was considered over two days and in separate hearings last week in Providence, R.I. With the announcement yesterday, Hall is expected to exhaust what might be her remaining options: the U.S. Olympic Committee review board and a date next month with a California arbitrator.
SPORTS
By Rick Maese and Rick Maese,Sun Columnist | March 22, 2008
Farrah Hall's Olympic dream might have caught its second wind. The Annapolis windsurfer finished second at the RS:X team-selection trials in October after a jury's controversial decision to grant another competitor's appeal. After Hall won the regatta on the water, a jury ruled that Nancy Rios' race was affected by a tear in her sail and awarded the Miami windsurfer the trials' win. Only the first-place finisher is slated to represent the United States at the Summer Olympics. The jury initially declined to hear Hall's request for redress because it was filed too late.
SPORTS
By Rick Maese and Rick Maese,Sun Columnist | February 22, 2008
Farrah Hall touched her dream. Then she screamed. She danced. She took pictures. She celebrated with her mom on the phone. Hall will never forget the feeling, short-lived as it was. For 90 minutes, Hall, a 26-year-old windsurfer from Annapolis, had won the right to represent the United States at the Summer Olympics. She finished first at the RS:X team-selection trials in Long Beach, Calif., in October. "It was just amazing. It's what I'd worked so hard for," she says. After the race, though, Hall was called out of the shower, brought into a room and told that another windsurfer had protested the race results.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | July 12, 1992
Call me a soldier of fortune -- at least where the water is concerned. Having done nothing more than wade in the surf after spending several weeks here along the Atlantic, I decided, like Ishmael in Melville's "Moby Dick," that I would "sail about a little and see the watery part of the world" -- well, at least of Ocean City.No vacation at the shore is a vacation unless you spend some time playing in the water. And water sports are as much a part of the resort as the beaches, the T-shirt shops and amusement parks.
NEWS
By Michael Catalini, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2010
Another article in a series about the people and the jobs that define a Maryland summer. Hal Ashman remembers the day his connection to watersport took hold. He was in college, spending a summer in Ocean City, and found himself on the shores of Assawoman Bay one evening with wind whipping around him and a windsurfing board at his feet. Having never taken a lesson, he mounted the board and grabbed the sail. "It was pure luck. Somehow I stood in the right place, held the equipment in the right way — and the wind was blowing like crazy — and all of a sudden, things just started working," said Ashman, now 49. "I was flying along the water on the windsurfer with really no experience ... and I knew I was getting hooked."
BUSINESS
By San Jose Mercury News | October 4, 2007
Growing up on the water in Annapolis, Diane Greene loved to sail her dinghy. She mastered windsurfing when the sport was new. She studied naval architecture and, as a young woman, lived in Hawaii designing windsurfing gear. Today, Greene, at 52, is best known for navigating VMware Inc., a company that might best be likened to a nuclear submarine. For years VMware operated in the obscure depths of computer science, gradually developing the know-how and market for its esoteric "virtualization" software.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 28, 2005
WHAT IF GIDGET and Moondoggie got married and moved to Maryland? They'd most likely be hanging out on the shores of Gunpowder Falls State Park having fun, fun, fun windsurfing with the kids of BABA. But, you say, these days Gidget would be a suburban matron with a job and young ones and responsibilities and an AARP card in the mail. Well, then, she'd fit right in at the Baltimore Area Boardsurfing Association. With 120 members, average age 45, the club has nearly as many whitecaps as the Chesapeake Bay on a fall day. The senior member, Bob Catzen, is 76. BABA ranks up there on the senior circuit in other ways, too. As one of the oldest (and largest)
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