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NEWS
November 29, 1992
British royal families have long been sensitive to what now is called public relations. In 1916, during the dark days of World War I, King George V determined that his Germanic family name was not politically correct. Would Tommies (British soldiers) go over the top (forward from the trenches) into the muzzles of Hun (German) guns for someone named Saxe-Coburg-Gotha? George changed the family name to a great patriotic symbol, something that would stand forever. He took the name of the house he lived in. He called himself Windsor.
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TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
As excitement builds for this week's opening of the Summer Olympics, many an armchair athlete may yearn to hop a transcontinental flight to London. But if a trip overseas isn't in the cards right now, why not discover a taste of jolly olde England closer to home? The nation's capital offers its own brand of proper British attractions, dining and lodging, say experts, suitable for even the most discerning Anglophile. "There are actually quite a few similarities between Europe and Washington, D.C., and one can certainly discover elements of British culture close to home," says Georgia Johnson Kicklighter of American Express Travel.
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FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 18, 1997
WINDSOR, England -- Prince Charles said the sight of a fire-ravaged Windsor Castle "made his blood run cold."His father, the Duke of Edinburgh, pondered the problems of rebuilding a priceless, uninsured home and said, "I felt that there was going to be a hell of a business trying to put it together again. I don't think anybody would have contemplated leaving it as a ruin."But five years after a blaze swept through the heart of the royal family's favorite residence, Windsor Castle has re-emerged, rebuilt and restored beyond its former glory.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
Camilla Parker Bowles married her longtime love Prince Charles yesterday in a regal affair, despite a veil of distaste that shrouded the union. And though some still might question the propriety of the marriage, it's doubtful that anyone will have much to criticize about the new Duchess of Cornwall's choice of wedding attire. Not generally known for her fashion sense, Parker Bowles, 57, faced international scrutiny yesterday and pulled off a tasteful, appropriate and elegant bridal look.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 24, 1996
WINDSOR, England -- The fire began the morning of Nov. 20, 1992, and burned for 15 hours, flames devouring grand drawing rooms and servants' quarters, while panic-stricken royals and commoners carted away leather-bound books, antique sofas and red velvet chairs.By the time it ended, after firefighters poured more than 1.5 million gallons of water on turrets and roofs that had been built to last centuries, the northeast corner of Windsor Castle lay a smoldering ruin.Now, the castle is still in the process of being restored.
NEWS
May 12, 1993
After the Baltimore Museum of Art and Walters Art Gallery introduced admission fees a few years back, could Buckingham Palace be far behind?It took the convergence of fire at Windsor Castle, the soaring unpopularity of the royal family and the embarrassment of the exchequer faced with the Windsor repair bill to bring Queen Elizabeth II into trade like some common aristocrat.She will open her London home, Buckingham Palace, which belongs to the Crown and not to her personally, to tourists in July and August.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 20, 2004
LONDON - Protesters in the British House of Commons hurled condoms full of purple cornstarch at Prime Minister Tony Blair yesterday, injuring no one but prompting an urgent examination of security. Two men, ages 50 and 36, were arrested. An organization called Fathers 4 Justice, which advocates greater child custody rights for men, claimed responsibility. The attack followed security lapses at Windsor Castle and the Big Ben bell tower and was made weeks after Parliament received an intelligence alert that it might be attacked with anthrax or ricin.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2003
The plaster artisans at Hayles & Howe Inc. spent yesterday morning sipping champagne in their Baltimore workshop and chatting with royalty. Well, listening to royalty, at any rate. Prince Andrew visited the ornamental plastering firm's British office to present the Queen's Award for outstanding achievements in international trade, and he said a few words to the Americans - who were connected by speaker phone. "Are you there, Baltimore?" said the prince, third son of Queen Elizabeth II. "Are you listening?"
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | November 24, 1992
LONDON -- The fire is out in Windsor Castle, but the effects of it still smolder as the public and politicians divide over who is going to pay to have the royal fortress restored.Peter Brooke, the heritage secretary, threw more fuel on the controversy when he repeated yesterday before the House of Commons that the government would pick up the cost of restoration."Windsor Castle is the property of the state, and it is the government's responsibility to ensure that resources are provided to maintain it in a manner commensurate with its status," he told the chamber.
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2005
At most weddings, the bride is queen for a day. But when your mother-in-law-to-be is the queen, just whose day is it, anyway? News that Queen Elizabeth II will not attend the April 8 town-hall civil ceremony uniting her son Prince Charles and longtime love Camilla Parker Bowles had British tabloids atwitter yesterday, with the announcement viewed as evidence that the monarch will never accept the prince's mistress as his wife. But royal watchers and etiquette experts said yesterday that the queen is doing the right thing.
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2005
At most weddings, the bride is queen for a day. But when your mother-in-law-to-be is the queen, just whose day is it, anyway? News that Queen Elizabeth II will not attend the April 8 town-hall civil ceremony uniting her son Prince Charles and longtime love Camilla Parker Bowles had British tabloids atwitter yesterday, with the announcement viewed as evidence that the monarch will never accept the prince's mistress as his wife. But royal watchers and etiquette experts said yesterday that the queen is doing the right thing.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 11, 2005
LONDON - Prince Charles, whose first marriage managed to go from an enchanting fairytale to sordid divorce, had to be aware that no divorced man in the history of the British monarchy had married a divorced woman with children and become - or remained - king. Rather than figure a way out of the binds of custom, he simply decided to move the monarchy forward, into the realities of the 21st century. Yesterday, he announced that he would wed Camilla Parker Bowles, the woman Princess Diana blamed for her breakup with the man first in line to the British throne.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 20, 2004
LONDON - Protesters in the British House of Commons hurled condoms full of purple cornstarch at Prime Minister Tony Blair yesterday, injuring no one but prompting an urgent examination of security. Two men, ages 50 and 36, were arrested. An organization called Fathers 4 Justice, which advocates greater child custody rights for men, claimed responsibility. The attack followed security lapses at Windsor Castle and the Big Ben bell tower and was made weeks after Parliament received an intelligence alert that it might be attacked with anthrax or ricin.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2003
The plaster artisans at Hayles & Howe Inc. spent yesterday morning sipping champagne in their Baltimore workshop and chatting with royalty. Well, listening to royalty, at any rate. Prince Andrew visited the ornamental plastering firm's British office to present the Queen's Award for outstanding achievements in international trade, and he said a few words to the Americans - who were connected by speaker phone. "Are you there, Baltimore?" said the prince, third son of Queen Elizabeth II. "Are you listening?"
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 18, 1997
WINDSOR, England -- Prince Charles said the sight of a fire-ravaged Windsor Castle "made his blood run cold."His father, the Duke of Edinburgh, pondered the problems of rebuilding a priceless, uninsured home and said, "I felt that there was going to be a hell of a business trying to put it together again. I don't think anybody would have contemplated leaving it as a ruin."But five years after a blaze swept through the heart of the royal family's favorite residence, Windsor Castle has re-emerged, rebuilt and restored beyond its former glory.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 1997
WASHINGTON - About 1639 the Mogul Emperor Shah Jahan of India, builder of the Taj Mahal, commissioned a great book to record the splendor of his reign. Meant to be illustrated with miniature paintings by the finest artists of the imperial atelier, it was titled, immodestly, the "Padshahnama," or "Chronicle of the King of the World."Shah Jahan was deposed by one of his sons in 1658. Only part of his book, it seems, was ever completed. After his death, 44 paintings executed for various court projects were cobbled together and bound with a written account of the first 10 years of his reign.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Contributing Writer | February 28, 1993
Across the road from Windsor Castle in London, Matt had his choice for an afternoon snack: a traditional English tea, McDonald's or Pizza Hut.Forget tea. He chose McDonald's -- along with a group of boys from nearby Eton College, Britain's famous public school that dates from 1440.The boys, young teen-agers who were decked out in American sports team caps and sweat shirts, and my 8-year-old son exchanged shy smiles between bites of burgers and fries. "They look just like American kids," Matt said.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
Camilla Parker Bowles married her longtime love Prince Charles yesterday in a regal affair, despite a veil of distaste that shrouded the union. And though some still might question the propriety of the marriage, it's doubtful that anyone will have much to criticize about the new Duchess of Cornwall's choice of wedding attire. Not generally known for her fashion sense, Parker Bowles, 57, faced international scrutiny yesterday and pulled off a tasteful, appropriate and elegant bridal look.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 24, 1996
WINDSOR, England -- The fire began the morning of Nov. 20, 1992, and burned for 15 hours, flames devouring grand drawing rooms and servants' quarters, while panic-stricken royals and commoners carted away leather-bound books, antique sofas and red velvet chairs.By the time it ended, after firefighters poured more than 1.5 million gallons of water on turrets and roofs that had been built to last centuries, the northeast corner of Windsor Castle lay a smoldering ruin.Now, the castle is still in the process of being restored.
NEWS
May 12, 1993
After the Baltimore Museum of Art and Walters Art Gallery introduced admission fees a few years back, could Buckingham Palace be far behind?It took the convergence of fire at Windsor Castle, the soaring unpopularity of the royal family and the embarrassment of the exchequer faced with the Windsor repair bill to bring Queen Elizabeth II into trade like some common aristocrat.She will open her London home, Buckingham Palace, which belongs to the Crown and not to her personally, to tourists in July and August.
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