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BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | January 30, 2007
NEW YORK -- Aiming to "wow" millions of computer users, Microsoft Corp. launched its Vista operating system for consumers yesterday with a series of flashy Manhattan events and midnight sales at stores around the world. Two months after arriving for business customers, the first major Windows upgrade in more than five years promises consumers a slicker 3-D look, improved security and search tools, and a host of multimedia and entertainment features. While promoted by Microsoft executives as an enormous step forward, many reviewers have been more reserved, calling Vista better than the current XP system and full of subtle improvements, but not a revolutionary advance.
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NEWS
By ROB PEGORARO | January 6, 2009
New home computers should come with the same warning label as many toys: Some assembly required. A fresh-out-of-the-box Windows or Macintosh machine may be able to get you on the Web, play your MP3s and collect your photos, but it can perform those tasks better with a little extra setup. Here's what to do with a new computer running Windows Vista or Mac OS X Leopard, the current versions of each operating system. Secure: On a Vista computer, Windows' built-in firewall defense will already be active, and you should be prompted to enable the preinstalled anti-virus software when you first boot up the PC. Do not ignore that step.
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BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | February 15, 2007
I am quite old and computer-ignorant. I need a new computer, as mine is about six years old and on its last legs. I took your suggestion and waited for Windows Vista, and I intend to get a new Dell with all the power I can get. What worries me is whether Vista will let me use programs that I used constantly over the years, such as Adobe Photoshop 2.0, which let me create and edit and print anything that came to mind. Photo montages, artistic creations - anything was possible. Will my old programs work in a new Vista system computer?
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION | November 29, 2007
Ihave a laptop computer with Windows XP and plan to buy a new desktop computer with Vista. I use the laptop when I travel and then transfer the files to my desktop when I am at home. Will I have any problems using files created or updated under XP and then transferred to the Vista machine, or vice versa? -- P.D. Hughey No one can promise you a completely smooth ride with any operating system. However, I have computers running both Windows XP and Windows Vista at home. I have yet to have the first problem moving data and opening files, no matter which computer created them.
NEWS
September 2, 2007
Traveling exhibit focuses on software The Microsoft Across America Truck, a traveling educational showcase of software for business, will visit Carroll Community College on Sept. 21. Interactive demonstrations will be conducted from 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. outside the front entrance to the college, 1601 Washington Road, at workstations inside the 42-foot truck. Exhibits, interactive experiences, and free seminars on Windows Vista, Office 2007 and Microsoft Exchange Server will be available by registering online at https:--www.
BUSINESS
By SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | August 2, 2006
Microsoft engineers will detail new security approaches in Windows Vista at an important technology conference in Las Vegas this week. But when it comes to grabbing attention, it won't be easy for them to top another session at the conference. Its title: "Subverting Vista Kernel For Fun And Profit." No, this is not your ordinary industry conference. In a first for Microsoft Corp., it will give a presentation at the Black Hat Briefings - an annual gathering in Las Vegas where hackers, researchers, government officials and corporate technology specialists unveil and analyze emerging computer security threats.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION | November 29, 2007
Ihave a laptop computer with Windows XP and plan to buy a new desktop computer with Vista. I use the laptop when I travel and then transfer the files to my desktop when I am at home. Will I have any problems using files created or updated under XP and then transferred to the Vista machine, or vice versa? -- P.D. Hughey No one can promise you a completely smooth ride with any operating system. However, I have computers running both Windows XP and Windows Vista at home. I have yet to have the first problem moving data and opening files, no matter which computer created them.
NEWS
By ROB PEGORARO | January 6, 2009
New home computers should come with the same warning label as many toys: Some assembly required. A fresh-out-of-the-box Windows or Macintosh machine may be able to get you on the Web, play your MP3s and collect your photos, but it can perform those tasks better with a little extra setup. Here's what to do with a new computer running Windows Vista or Mac OS X Leopard, the current versions of each operating system. Secure: On a Vista computer, Windows' built-in firewall defense will already be active, and you should be prompted to enable the preinstalled anti-virus software when you first boot up the PC. Do not ignore that step.
BUSINESS
By The Seattle Times | September 14, 2006
SEATTLE -- A brain injury at 16 made tying her shoes a challenge for Logan Olson, let alone the demands of publishing a magazine. Olson is on the computer constantly, typing out ideas, researching seasonal fashions and corresponding with writers and advertisers to assemble the coming premiere issue of a lifestyle magazine for young women with disabilities. But the loss of fine-motor skills means her fingers can't keep pace with her mind. Microsoft's forthcoming Windows Vista operating system has speech-recognition technology that could make her work a lot easier.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | October 19, 2006
When hundreds of millions of people rely on software that grows more complex with each release, publishers find it harder and harder to get updates out the door - as Microsoft knows all too well. Windows Vista, the long-awaited revision of Microsoft's flagship operating system, won't be ready for consumers until early next year - years behind schedule and a couple of months too late for the Christmas shopping season. Luckily, Microsoft won't make us wait quite that long to update its Web browser.
NEWS
September 2, 2007
Traveling exhibit focuses on software The Microsoft Across America Truck, a traveling educational showcase of software for business, will visit Carroll Community College on Sept. 21. Interactive demonstrations will be conducted from 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. outside the front entrance to the college, 1601 Washington Road, at workstations inside the 42-foot truck. Exhibits, interactive experiences, and free seminars on Windows Vista, Office 2007 and Microsoft Exchange Server will be available by registering online at https:--www.
BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | February 15, 2007
I am quite old and computer-ignorant. I need a new computer, as mine is about six years old and on its last legs. I took your suggestion and waited for Windows Vista, and I intend to get a new Dell with all the power I can get. What worries me is whether Vista will let me use programs that I used constantly over the years, such as Adobe Photoshop 2.0, which let me create and edit and print anything that came to mind. Photo montages, artistic creations - anything was possible. Will my old programs work in a new Vista system computer?
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | January 30, 2007
NEW YORK -- Aiming to "wow" millions of computer users, Microsoft Corp. launched its Vista operating system for consumers yesterday with a series of flashy Manhattan events and midnight sales at stores around the world. Two months after arriving for business customers, the first major Windows upgrade in more than five years promises consumers a slicker 3-D look, improved security and search tools, and a host of multimedia and entertainment features. While promoted by Microsoft executives as an enormous step forward, many reviewers have been more reserved, calling Vista better than the current XP system and full of subtle improvements, but not a revolutionary advance.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | October 19, 2006
When hundreds of millions of people rely on software that grows more complex with each release, publishers find it harder and harder to get updates out the door - as Microsoft knows all too well. Windows Vista, the long-awaited revision of Microsoft's flagship operating system, won't be ready for consumers until early next year - years behind schedule and a couple of months too late for the Christmas shopping season. Luckily, Microsoft won't make us wait quite that long to update its Web browser.
BUSINESS
By The Seattle Times | September 14, 2006
SEATTLE -- A brain injury at 16 made tying her shoes a challenge for Logan Olson, let alone the demands of publishing a magazine. Olson is on the computer constantly, typing out ideas, researching seasonal fashions and corresponding with writers and advertisers to assemble the coming premiere issue of a lifestyle magazine for young women with disabilities. But the loss of fine-motor skills means her fingers can't keep pace with her mind. Microsoft's forthcoming Windows Vista operating system has speech-recognition technology that could make her work a lot easier.
BUSINESS
By SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | August 2, 2006
Microsoft engineers will detail new security approaches in Windows Vista at an important technology conference in Las Vegas this week. But when it comes to grabbing attention, it won't be easy for them to top another session at the conference. Its title: "Subverting Vista Kernel For Fun And Profit." No, this is not your ordinary industry conference. In a first for Microsoft Corp., it will give a presentation at the Black Hat Briefings - an annual gathering in Las Vegas where hackers, researchers, government officials and corporate technology specialists unveil and analyze emerging computer security threats.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | November 9, 2006
Normally, I don't start writing about holiday PC buying until we toss out the last Thanksgiving leftovers. But this is the strangest computer shopping season I can recall. The reason: Virtually every PC on store shelves through the holidays will be a leftover. There's nothing wrong with leftovers from the table; some stews and soups are actually better the second time around. But we're talking about computers here, so the comparison is a bit more complicated. Why is this a season of leftovers?
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