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By LESTER A. PICKER | April 20, 1992
Some weeks ago, I reviewed Windows software that I felt would help non-profit organizations -- columns that generated a good number of comments from readers. Now, three new developments in the Windows environment are worthy of a quick update."What's the big deal with Windows software?," one reader asked me. "They claim it's so easy to use and it saves time. Oh yeah? So how come you can literally watch your hair grow while you wait for it to print?"Good point, I had to admit.One of the more frustrating things about Windows 3.0 is the wait time for printing documents, especially ones that incorporate tables or other graphic elements.
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BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 16, 1999
As mass movements go, Windows Refund Day might not have achieved the political profile of an anti-war protest or the popular support of, say, saving the whales. But for a demonstration over computer software, the turnout yesterday was not too shabby.More than 100 self-proclaimed computer geeks showed up at Microsoft Corp. sales offices in several cities to make a public display of rejecting the software maker's ubiquitous Windows operating system and demanding their money back.Organized by advocates of Linux, a free operating system, the first March on Microsoft focused on a clause in the Windows license included with the software that comes installed on PCs. That clause states that users who do not agree to the terms of the license can request a refund.
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BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 16, 1999
As mass movements go, Windows Refund Day might not have achieved the political profile of an anti-war protest or the popular support of, say, saving the whales. But for a demonstration over computer software, the turnout yesterday was not too shabby.More than 100 self-proclaimed computer geeks showed up at Microsoft Corp. sales offices in several cities to make a public display of rejecting the software maker's ubiquitous Windows operating system and demanding their money back.Organized by advocates of Linux, a free operating system, the first March on Microsoft focused on a clause in the Windows license included with the software that comes installed on PCs. That clause states that users who do not agree to the terms of the license can request a refund.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | April 20, 1992
Some weeks ago, I reviewed Windows software that I felt would help non-profit organizations -- columns that generated a good number of comments from readers. Now, three new developments in the Windows environment are worthy of a quick update."What's the big deal with Windows software?," one reader asked me. "They claim it's so easy to use and it saves time. Oh yeah? So how come you can literally watch your hair grow while you wait for it to print?"Good point, I had to admit.One of the more frustrating things about Windows 3.0 is the wait time for printing documents, especially ones that incorporate tables or other graphic elements.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | April 7, 1992
The long-awaited Microsoft Windows 3.1 computer program arrived yesterday in local software stores, where copies were grabbed up by users eager to make their IBM-style computers easier to operate."
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis and Peter H. Lewis,New York Times News Service | November 14, 1990
LAS VEGAS -- Smaller, faster, more powerful, less expensive and more overwhelming: These are the words that best describe the products on display here at the annual personal computer trade exposition called Comdex, a high-tech bazaar where an estimated 120,000 computer buyers and sellers are meeting this week to inspect the latest hardware and software.The new products are spread out over more than 2 million square feet of display booths.On the desktop, machines of the first generation to be based on the Intel 486 microprocessor are on display.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | January 6, 1992
Lately, one topic has consistently come up when I talk with non-profit executives about technology issues: Should we move to Windows or not? Asking me that question is like asking a Bedouin which snow sled is best. A computer expert I'm not. As long as it does what I need it to do, I couldn't care less what goes on inside the black box.So, maybe eight months ago, hat in hand and heavily armed with ignorance, I approached the chief guru of our computer affiliate, Dr. Ed Boas of International Computer Associates in Chesapeake City.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 6, 1992
The reasons PCs outsell the Mac 10-to-1 are numerous, but let's focus on two key issues: choice and price.All sorts of people need to use personal computers, and they have all sorts of requirements, budgets and experience levels. The PC marketplace offers any imaginable combination of price, service and selection; the Mac marketplace is dictated by Apple. PC users can buy a preconfigured Windows system with no installation needed or build one from scratch. There is a choice!A mildly experienced PC user willing to install Windows (it takes about 20 minutes)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Aaron Zitner and Aaron Zitner,BOSTON GLOBE | May 25, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Everyone knows Coke and Pepsi. Not as many people understand the computer industry's distribution channels and product lines.And so, with billions of dollars in business potentially at stake in the Microsoft Corp. case, a public relations battle is emerging over the analogies used to explain the software industry and antitrust law.For example, Microsoft has protested the government's effort to force it to distribute a World Wide Web browser made by Netscape, a rival company, with every copy of Microsoft's Windows 98 software.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | April 15, 1996
THE HUMAN RACE HAS functioned fairly well for thousands of years despite a large number of operating system incompatibilities. There are different standards for sex, language, race, religion, politics and personal computers.With its new program Soft Windows 95 for Power Macintosh, Insignia Solutions Inc. has done little to resolve the battle of the sexes or the 1996 election, but it has succeeded fairly well in forging a closer relationship between the Macintosh and Windows cultures.Soft Windows 95, with an estimated retail price of $350, effectively converts a fast Macintosh into a slow 486-based PC that is capable of using Windows software.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | April 7, 1992
The long-awaited Microsoft Windows 3.1 computer program arrived yesterday in local software stores, where copies were grabbed up by users eager to make their IBM-style computers easier to operate."
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | January 6, 1992
Lately, one topic has consistently come up when I talk with non-profit executives about technology issues: Should we move to Windows or not? Asking me that question is like asking a Bedouin which snow sled is best. A computer expert I'm not. As long as it does what I need it to do, I couldn't care less what goes on inside the black box.So, maybe eight months ago, hat in hand and heavily armed with ignorance, I approached the chief guru of our computer affiliate, Dr. Ed Boas of International Computer Associates in Chesapeake City.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis and Peter H. Lewis,New York Times News Service | November 14, 1990
LAS VEGAS -- Smaller, faster, more powerful, less expensive and more overwhelming: These are the words that best describe the products on display here at the annual personal computer trade exposition called Comdex, a high-tech bazaar where an estimated 120,000 computer buyers and sellers are meeting this week to inspect the latest hardware and software.The new products are spread out over more than 2 million square feet of display booths.On the desktop, machines of the first generation to be based on the Intel 486 microprocessor are on display.
NEWS
October 31, 2001
WINDOWS ON THE ART WORLD Microsoft revolutionzed the computer world with its Windows software. Now you can find out how Microsoft has also opened windows on the art world with the Microsoft Art Collection at www.microsoft.com / mscorp / artcollection / . Since 1987, Microsoft has been collecting eclectic pieces of art to brighten its work environment. Microsoft shares its artwork on this exciting Web site. You can view current or past exhibits or take a stroll through the recent acquisitions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2003
Why can't I open Zip files on my computer? Do I need a special program? I am using Windows Millennium. Zip is a compression technique that uses mathematical tricks to duplicate all of the data in a file while using just a fraction of the space it consumes when displayed for actual human consumption. So lots of people use the technique to squeeze down files before sending them as e-mail attachments, thus causing a great deal of confusion because those at the other end need their own Zip program to unzip them into usable form.
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