Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWindows Nt
IN THE NEWS

Windows Nt

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | May 24, 1993
REDMOND, Wash. -- A case of opening-night jitters pervades the sprawling corporate headquarters here that has become the world's software capital.On the verge of introducing its most ambitious software product yet, Windows NT, Microsoft Corp. has found itself in an unusual position: It is trying to ratchet back the expectations of the computer industry and computer users, who have come to expect blockbuster products with clockwork regularity from the world's dominant software publisher.NT stands for "new technology" and its formal introduction at an industry show in Atlanta today has been anticipated for months by the trade press and business publications, as well as by legions of computer hardware and software makers that have designed entire product lines to accommodate it. Microsoft sent about 70,000 test copies not only to those hardware and software people, but also to potential customers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 24, 2001
SEATTLE - Federal agents here have cracked a Russian computer-hacking ring that prosecutors say victimized dozens of e-commerce businesses in 10 states through extortion and the theft of thousands of credit card numbers. Two young hackers have been arrested and indicted after the FBI set up a bogus Internet-security company, called "Invita," and let the men hack into it, authorities said. Then, they lured the men to the United States to apply for jobs. An amended 20-count indictment from a Seattle grand jury this month identifies the men as Alexey Ivanov, 20, and Vasiliy Gorshkov, 25. Prosecutors say they might be linked to hundreds of crimes, including the highly publicized theft of 15,700 credit card numbers from Western Union in Denver in September.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 20, 1999
REDMOND, Wash. -- Microsoft Corp., the world's biggest software maker, reported yesterday that its fiscal fourth-quarter profit jumped 62 percent, beating estimates, on strong sales of its Office 2000 group of business software.Earnings for the period that ended June 30 climbed to $2.20 billion, or 40 cents a share, from $1.36 billion, or 25 cents a share, a year earlier. The average analyst estimate was 36 cents a share.Revenue rose to $5.76 billion in the quarter, from $4 billion a year earlier.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 20, 1999
REDMOND, Wash. -- Microsoft Corp., the world's biggest software maker, reported yesterday that its fiscal fourth-quarter profit jumped 62 percent, beating estimates, on strong sales of its Office 2000 group of business software.Earnings for the period that ended June 30 climbed to $2.20 billion, or 40 cents a share, from $1.36 billion, or 25 cents a share, a year earlier. The average analyst estimate was 36 cents a share.Revenue rose to $5.76 billion in the quarter, from $4 billion a year earlier.
BUSINESS
By Paul Andrews and Paul Andrews,Seattle Times | December 28, 1992
SEATTLE -- Novell's $350 million purchase of Unix Systems Laboratories from AT&T last week may unwittingly have aided the Provo, Utah-based software company's archnemesis, Microsoft Corp., in the latter's encounter with the Federal Trade Commission.Analysts praised what they termed a gutsy move by Novell -- which dominates personal-computer networking software, with a more than 70 percent market share -- to combat the looming assault of Microsoft's Windows NT software next year."The implications in the long term are extremely positive for Novell in the sense that they are taking the Unix operating system into the desktop arena," said Cecilia Brancato at Oppenheimer.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | July 23, 1996
REDMOND, Wash. -- Microsoft Corp.'s fourth-quarter earnings rose 41 percent, more than most analysts expected, on strong sales of its business computer programs and Windows NT and Windows 95 operating systems.The solid showing may ease concerns about earnings from computer and software companies amid disappointing forecasts from Digital Equipment Corp. and Hewlett-Packard Co., analysts said."They did better than I was expecting," said Jamie Kiggen, an analyst at Bear Stearns & Co. in New York.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 24, 2001
SEATTLE - Federal agents here have cracked a Russian computer-hacking ring that prosecutors say victimized dozens of e-commerce businesses in 10 states through extortion and the theft of thousands of credit card numbers. Two young hackers have been arrested and indicted after the FBI set up a bogus Internet-security company, called "Invita," and let the men hack into it, authorities said. Then, they lured the men to the United States to apply for jobs. An amended 20-count indictment from a Seattle grand jury this month identifies the men as Alexey Ivanov, 20, and Vasiliy Gorshkov, 25. Prosecutors say they might be linked to hundreds of crimes, including the highly publicized theft of 15,700 credit card numbers from Western Union in Denver in September.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 25, 1997
REDMOND, Wash. -- Windows 97 might well become Windows 98. And that news sent Microsoft Corp. shares tumbling yesterday, after the company said the next version of its operating software wouldn't be on the market in time for Christmas sales.Microsoft closed down $3.875 at $90.125 yesterday after having been as low as $87.50. With 23.3 million shares trading, it was the most active U.S. stock.The announcement was Microsoft's second recent delay of a key product.The updated Windows operating system had been expected to be released in time for the important holiday season.
BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 13, 1992
IBM and Microsoft Corp. have begun spending millions of dollars on everything from television advertising to telephone support lines in an effort to woo personal computer owners to their competing operating systems: IBM's OS/2 2.0 and Microsoft's Windows 3.1.But that flurry of marketing hype and salesmanship is just a preliminary round before the main bout: the battle over who will control the crucial market for operating systems on powerful "servers" that...
BUSINESS
By Laurie Flynn and Laurie Flynn,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | August 3, 1992
Like your uncle's 1972 Buick, the DOS operating system is rusty and gets lousy mileage. But as long as it gets you where you're going, who needs a CD player and fuel injection?Millions of personal computer users are taking such a view of graphical user interfaces like Windows. Having finally mastered DOS enough to maneuver around a hard disk, type and print out a letter, and maybe calculate a spreadsheet, many users say they can find no good reason to disrupt everything because Microsoft Corp.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 25, 1997
REDMOND, Wash. -- Windows 97 might well become Windows 98. And that news sent Microsoft Corp. shares tumbling yesterday, after the company said the next version of its operating software wouldn't be on the market in time for Christmas sales.Microsoft closed down $3.875 at $90.125 yesterday after having been as low as $87.50. With 23.3 million shares trading, it was the most active U.S. stock.The announcement was Microsoft's second recent delay of a key product.The updated Windows operating system had been expected to be released in time for the important holiday season.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | July 23, 1996
REDMOND, Wash. -- Microsoft Corp.'s fourth-quarter earnings rose 41 percent, more than most analysts expected, on strong sales of its business computer programs and Windows NT and Windows 95 operating systems.The solid showing may ease concerns about earnings from computer and software companies amid disappointing forecasts from Digital Equipment Corp. and Hewlett-Packard Co., analysts said."They did better than I was expecting," said Jamie Kiggen, an analyst at Bear Stearns & Co. in New York.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | May 24, 1993
REDMOND, Wash. -- A case of opening-night jitters pervades the sprawling corporate headquarters here that has become the world's software capital.On the verge of introducing its most ambitious software product yet, Windows NT, Microsoft Corp. has found itself in an unusual position: It is trying to ratchet back the expectations of the computer industry and computer users, who have come to expect blockbuster products with clockwork regularity from the world's dominant software publisher.NT stands for "new technology" and its formal introduction at an industry show in Atlanta today has been anticipated for months by the trade press and business publications, as well as by legions of computer hardware and software makers that have designed entire product lines to accommodate it. Microsoft sent about 70,000 test copies not only to those hardware and software people, but also to potential customers.
BUSINESS
By Paul Andrews and Paul Andrews,Seattle Times | December 28, 1992
SEATTLE -- Novell's $350 million purchase of Unix Systems Laboratories from AT&T last week may unwittingly have aided the Provo, Utah-based software company's archnemesis, Microsoft Corp., in the latter's encounter with the Federal Trade Commission.Analysts praised what they termed a gutsy move by Novell -- which dominates personal-computer networking software, with a more than 70 percent market share -- to combat the looming assault of Microsoft's Windows NT software next year."The implications in the long term are extremely positive for Novell in the sense that they are taking the Unix operating system into the desktop arena," said Cecilia Brancato at Oppenheimer.
BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 13, 1992
IBM and Microsoft Corp. have begun spending millions of dollars on everything from television advertising to telephone support lines in an effort to woo personal computer owners to their competing operating systems: IBM's OS/2 2.0 and Microsoft's Windows 3.1.But that flurry of marketing hype and salesmanship is just a preliminary round before the main bout: the battle over who will control the crucial market for operating systems on powerful "servers" that...
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | June 21, 1993
Refusing to concede defeat in the face of daunting opposition, the International Business Machines Corp. is once again trying to convince the world that OS/2 is the best operating system for the current generation of personal computers.This time it may be right, though right doesn't always make might in the software business. At a technical symposium last week in Austin, Texas, the home of its new personal software products division, IBM introduced what is by far the most impressive version yet of OS/2.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | November 15, 1993
The heavyweights of the personal-computer industry are prepared once again to slug it out in Las Vegas where the annual Comdex/Fall trade show opens today.The tone for this year's extravaganza was set earlier this month, when a man in a powered parachute sailed down into the Las Vegas boxing ring where Evander Holyfield and Riddick Bowe were fighting for the heavyweight title.If there is a similar disruption this week, it will be the arrival of the PowerPC chip. The chip is a new microprocessor forged by the alliance of IBM, Apple Computer and Motorola.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.