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Windows 98

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By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,New York Times News Service | September 29, 1997
MICROSOFT Corp. recently announced that Windows 98, the successor to its Windows 95 operating system, would be delayed. The new target date is the second quarter of 1998, which in the computer world tends to mean "one minute before the first of July, assuming we don't blow it."An early version of Windows 98 is already being tested by a select cadre of fearless users (not me), and a fairly clear view of the final version is taking shape. Last-minute surprises are always possible, but for now the upgrade looks like an extremely modest improvement that may give you a reason to wait before buying a new machine.
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By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 8, 2004
When I start Windows 98, this annoying dialogue box appears asking to "Enter Network Password," with user name already showing. I hit Cancel or press the Enter key to continue the boot. Is there a way to stop this from appearing and banish it to the Recycle Bin forever? All over the planet, millions of folks with PCs based on Windows 98 probably go through that same weary and needless password dance every time they turn on their machines. It dates back to more primitive times when networking was much more difficult.
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By MICHAEL HIMOWITZ | June 22, 1998
The latest release of the world's dominant computer operating system officially goes on sale Thursday with about 1/100th of the hoopla that greeted the debut of Windows 95 almost three years ago.Even Microsoft concedes that Windows 98 is an "evolutionary" update - antitrust suits notwithstanding. But it's still worth having because it fixes a lot of the bugs that have bedeviled Windows 95 users, makes it easier to recover from crashes, supports a lot of fancy new hardware, conserves hard disk space, and can even speed up your system a bit.Windows 98 also integrates the operating system tightly with the World Wide Web (one of the alleged misdeeds that got Microsoft in trouble with the Justice Department)
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 25, 2003
When I bought a new computer with a 120-gigabyte hard drive, 512 megabytes of RAM and Windows XP, I had the seller install as a second drive my old 20 GB hard drive with Windows 98SE. However, when I turn the machine on, it does not offer that drive as a choice. Instead I have to go to setup and have that Windows 98 drive as the selection on all three drive selections, the floppy, the CD, and the second hard drive. How can I have my computer let me select either operating system or hard drive like Partition Magic does when you install another operating system on the main hard disk?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,COX NEWS SERVICE | September 7, 1998
Let's start by agreeing that Windows 98 is not as good as it could be. But danged little is.If I insisted on pure excellence in my life, I'd have to stop eating in the cafeteria at work, give away my golf clubs and never again sing in the shower.And Windows 98, despite its quirks and problems, is better than earlier versions and one heck of a lot better than cafeteria Salisbury steak.So instead of sulking, let's talk about some of the ways to get the most performance out of Windows 98. The good news is simple ways exist to improve the speed and reliability of Windows.
BUSINESS
By Samantha Kappalman | October 26, 1997
THE Justice Department last week charged Microsoft Corp. with violating a 1995 consent decree and asked a federal judge to impose a $1 million-a-day fine.The government contends that by requiring personal computer makers to include its Internet Explorer Web browser software when they install its Windows 95 operating system, the company is unfairly exploiting its near-monopoly on PC operating systems and seeking to dominate the browser market. While Netscape Communications Corp.'s Navigator software is still the leading browser, Microsoft's Internet Explorer is gaining fast.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL HIMOWITZ | April 5, 1998
ONE DAY in the summer of 1995, I sat down in front of a perfectly good PC and stuck a brand new Microsoft Windows 95 CD in the drive. Then I swallowed hard and clicked on Setup.To my utter amazement, the new operating system installed without a hitch -- a feat that's analogous to changing the engine in a car and having it start up the first time without so much as a hiccup.The honeymoon didn't last long. Over the last 2 1/2 years, I've fought more than a few skirmishes with Windows 95, and often wound up on the losing side.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and By James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 5, 2001
Can you tell me a way that I can change the size of the various windows that pop up when I click on icons? Whenever I insert a floppy disk in my computer's A: drive and click on the disk's icon, I get a huge window that covers the entire screen. So I have to resize the giant window so that I can see the icons on my desktop at the same time I am working with stuff on the floppy drive. It used to be that these windows were 5 inches by 5 inches, and that was OK. How do I fix this? Windows 98 hides the command you need under a tool called View in the toolbar contained in every window.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 17, 2002
My daughter received a Dell PC with the Windows XP operating system for Christmas. My daughter's old PC used Windows 98, and she wants data saved to her new PC. Your suggestion in an earlier column to buy a Zip drive was very enlightening but a little too expensive for me. Please tell me if you think this is a viable alternative. I was going to remove the old hard drive and install it in a spare bay in the new PC. I suspect that you can fix things for your daughter quite nicely with a $5 Ethernet cable instead of a $50 to $100 Zip drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sean Gallagher and Sean Gallagher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 8, 1998
Unless you've spent the last few months hiding in a Montana mountain cabin, you know about the controversy surrounding Microsoft Windows 98.While an antitrust lawsuit swirls around it, the latest upgrade to the Windows operating system is due to hit store shelves on June 25.Legal hoopla aside, Windows 98 is an important upgrade for PC users - for reasons that have little to do with the integrated Web browsing software that prompted the U.S. Justice Department's...
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 20, 2003
How do I get my computer back to its original configuration, or at least to the configuration when I installed Windows 98 about two years ago? The computer runs very sluggishly, even though I perform ScanDisk and defragmenting maintenance regularly. In addition, I believe that I have messed up a number of things when trying to delete programs or functions that I thought were not necessary. I have a Gateway P5-150 with a 2.37-gigabyte hard drive (1.5 Gb used and 890 megabytes free), 80 Mb of RAM, 32-bit file system and 32-bit virtual memory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 2003
My wife's computer uses Windows ME and had worked well, but recently running programs and using the Internet seemed very slow. I corrected the problem by going into the "msconfig" menu and shutting down all the Startup Group items. Are these necessary? You need to keep only these items in the Windows ME Startup menu if they are checked on your machine: Scan Registry, Task Monitor, System Tray, your antivirus program and LoadPowerProfile (some machines do not use the LoadPowerProfile; others use more than one profile)
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 28, 2002
Our home network of a Windows 98 machine and a Windows XP machine linked by a cable/DSL router box has stopped working. The computers can share the Internet connection, but they no longer can be used to exchange files. The file sharing worked at first but no longer. The Windows 98 computer was set up on the network using a set-up disk created by the XP computer. I have done all the XP upgrades recommended, but nothing helps. I've also tried resetting the network once, and that worked for a short time and then stopped working for file sharing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | October 3, 2002
As a PC kind of guy, I rarely suffer from Mac envy, but I'll admit turning green last year when Apple announced its iPod digital music player. The elegant, 6.5-ounce gadget - about the size of a pack of cigarettes - featured a tiny but capacious hard drive and a slick, friendly interface that made competing players seem downright clunky. Now Apple has an iPod for the rest of us - or at least those who have the right PC and recent versions of Microsoft Windows. As expected, it's a pleasure to use, with superb sound and a beautifully simple control panel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | June 27, 2002
ONE OF THE benefits of writing a column is that you get every possible opportunity to learn from your mistakes - and an opportunity to apologize in public. So, Microsoft, I owe you an apology. A couple of weeks ago, when I said the Windows XP operating system was a bloated hog that turned today's hottest computers into tortoises that run no faster than the last generation of PCs, I was telling only half the story. Windows XP is indeed a hog, but it's not the only reason that today's fast computers aren't much better at real work than the PCs available two years ago. Another reason is that Intel's flagship processor, the Pentium 4, is as much a product of marketing hype as of technology.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 28, 2002
My computer is about 2 years old. And, though I would like to upgrade to a newer one, I don't have the funds to purchase what I want at this time. My system is a 166 MHz Pentium w/MMX running Windows 95. Should I upgrade the operating system, and, if so, to what - Windows 98? I'm finding less and less support for Windows 95 out there, including from Microsoft, and I am not a techie who can keep 95 running forever. Any help you can provide will be appreciated. It's relatively easy to get one's hands on older operating systems such as Windows 98 or even Windows 95 at discount stores or using auction Web sites such as www. ebay.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 15, 2000
REDMOND, Wash. - Microsoft Corp. started selling the new Windows operating system for consumers yesterday, giving the world's largest software maker a new product for home computer users in time for the holiday shopping season. Windows Millennium Edition, or Windows Me, is available in stores and will be included in new machines from personal computer makers including Compaq Computer Corp., Hewlett-Packard Co. and International Business Machines Corp., Microsoft said. The new operating system replaces Windows 98. It is a temporary upgrade until Microsoft releases a more ambitious system for consumers next year, code-named Whistler, analysts said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | December 6, 1999
I travel for business, and I need to get my msn.com mail at a location where I can't change the settings in someone else's system. I am looking for a Web site where I can enter my user name and password and get my e-mail.The popmail service built into almost any Internet service provider's e-mail service can forward e-mail to one of the many Web-based e-mail services.These Web sites let you log on to any Internet browser and offer e-mail accounts on the order of yourname@hotmail.com. They almost always let users access their e-mail accounts on traditional Internet service providers using the popmail feature, which is explained in detail during setup.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 17, 2002
My daughter received a Dell PC with the Windows XP operating system for Christmas. My daughter's old PC used Windows 98, and she wants data saved to her new PC. Your suggestion in an earlier column to buy a Zip drive was very enlightening but a little too expensive for me. Please tell me if you think this is a viable alternative. I was going to remove the old hard drive and install it in a spare bay in the new PC. I suspect that you can fix things for your daughter quite nicely with a $5 Ethernet cable instead of a $50 to $100 Zip drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 2001
My desktop PC with Windows 98 can't perform the programmed maintenance of defragmenting its hard drive. The program starts with checking files and folders up to 4 percent and then cuts out and starts all over. Reinstalling Windows 98 didn't help. To defragment my hard disk, I have to start my PC in Safe Mode, which is time-consuming. How can I restore this function? Many Windows users find that every time they try to run hard-drive utilities like ScanDisk or Defragment, the machine gets down to just a few minutes left to complete the task only to blurt out an error message that another process has begun and the Defrag or ScanDisk must start over to prevent data loss.
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