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NEWS
December 28, 2011
I'm a Baltimore Country employee. I have worked for the county for 36 years. I drive a school bus and plan to retire in 2013 at the age of 62 if all goes well. I belong to the retirement system. Of course, I do not make the pay that the Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and two former councilmen receive ("A pension windfall," Dec. 18). I work had for my pay and a truck driver hauling beer makes more than I do, only I have a greater responsibility. Hopefully, my retirement check and Social Security check will keep me above water.
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NEWS
July 29, 2014
Chicago's 2008 privatization of its municipal parking assets is widely considered to be a colossal boondoggle. Los Angeles considered selling off a few of its parking garages earlier this decade but scrapped the idea after it became clear that the deal wouldn't be nearly as good as initially advertised. Pittsburgh's city council killed a parking privatization deal in 2010 amid concerns about hidden costs in the proposed contract. In 2013, Cincinnati signed a deal to privatize its parking, but then voters rebelled, electing an anti-privatization mayor and city council, who promptly killed the plan.
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Letter to The Aegis | August 13, 2013
Editor: Where is the casino money? When our illustrious governor lobbied for the casino bill in Maryland, he assured the voters that the schools would receive a large share of the revenue. I knew then, as I am sure of now, that this was a ploy to get his way and money into the richer counties that have supported him. Harford County Government and Harford County Schools are blaming each other for the deficit that is causing the elimination of school bus stops in some areas.  Meanwhile it is our children and their safety that is at stake while these people twiddle away doing nothing to alleviate the situation.
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Letter to The Aegis | August 13, 2013
Editor: Where is the casino money? When our illustrious governor lobbied for the casino bill in Maryland, he assured the voters that the schools would receive a large share of the revenue. I knew then, as I am sure of now, that this was a ploy to get his way and money into the richer counties that have supported him. Harford County Government and Harford County Schools are blaming each other for the deficit that is causing the elimination of school bus stops in some areas.  Meanwhile it is our children and their safety that is at stake while these people twiddle away doing nothing to alleviate the situation.
NEWS
May 29, 2003
PRESIDENT BUSH'S tax cut package sends cash relief to the states, including a cool $333 million for the tapped-out accounts of Maryland. It's found money in hard times, a blessing to be sure. But it's less than a stopgap, no more than a partial reprieve. Long-term budget balancing must continue, but immediate and painful economies that might have been unavoidable now seem less urgent. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. should be breathing somewhat easier as he goes about the task of filling a $135 million hole in this year's budget created by his veto of a three-part tax bill.
NEWS
May 10, 1995
An unexpected windfall from the city's sale of Harrison's Pier 5 Hotel will mean an extra $1.2 million for the Enoch Pratt Free Library. It's difficult to get too excited, though, since the additional funding will only give the Pratt enough money to maintain current services for an additional year.The central library will still be closed on both Fridays and Sundays. That's not what one would expect from "the city that reads."But Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke should be commended for even thinking of the Pratt while completing the agreement to sell Harrison's Pier 5. He probably had enough on his mind deciding whether selling the bankrupt hotel and restaurant to a new investment group is the kick in the pants it needs.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | February 20, 2000
IN THE END, it was a hippopotamus that trampled Jason Dettelbach's chances of becoming a millionaire last month. The 24-year-old College Park resident, appearing on the television quiz show "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" failed to pick out the hippo in a multiple choice lineup as the animal that kills the most people in Africa. Still, Dettelbach walked off with $125,000 and another question: What do you do with a windfall? It's not an unusual situation. Bonuses, inheritances, lotteries and stock options can all of a sudden dump a lump sum in your lap. Local, financial experts say those with newfound wealth may splurge on a new car or vacation, but often end up with the same goal: To not lose what they've gained.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | September 15, 2000
Have you inherited money recently or received an insurance settlement or other windfall? "Do nothing aggressive for a while," Financial Planning Perspectives advises. "If the inheritance is in cash, put it into low-risk money market funds or CDs." In a survey, the newsletter noted, it was "found that 40 percent of baby boomers who have received at least a $50,000 inheritance made a financial decision in less than a week. "Whatever the form of monies received, take time to focus on what you want to do with the money: invest it for retirement, buy a new home, make charitable donations or pay off certain debts.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,Staff Correspondent | February 11, 1992
BRIDES-les-BAINS, France -- This is an Olympic story, but barely. It is more a story about leveraging the Olympics, about youth and consequences, about paying the price for squeezing and squeezing the Games until the rings drip money.It is about the 600 residents of this quiet mountain resort using the Olympics of Albertville to play poker with their future, and winding up with high hopes -- but also with a mortgage to cry about and a seven-foot wire fence splitting their town in half."The future has some people worried," says Veronique Avazov, the owner of a perfume store.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | August 29, 2001
IF YOU RECEIVE a big sum of money, what should you do? Note "Rules for Investing a Windfall," from Dartmouth Alumni Magazine: "Don't go nuts frittering your money away for wants ahead of your needs. If you do, the windfall will soon be gone. Cover children's education and your retirement first. If you need money for college expenses, set aside that money in a safe place. Plan your estate. Get a financial planner." SAFETY FIRST: How safe is a money market fund? "Although one institutional money fund did liquidate, causing losses of 6 percent for its institutional shareholders, no individual investor has ever lost money in a money market fund.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
The Sun's recent headlines about rising gambling revenues neglect to note the fact that the companies' profits, or course, represent money lost by the players ("Casino take soars in June," July 6). Add this to the increases in the gasoline tax and bridge and highway tolls, and one would think that the state of Maryland and Baltimore would have no more need of additional taxes. Dream on. What if it doesn't rain? No runoff taxes. What happens if we drink less water? Headline: "Water tax collection drops - people breaking into fire hydrants.
NEWS
May 9, 2013
As soon as I heard about the "rain tax," I knew politicians in this state wouldn't be able to keep their hands off this revenue windfall ("Faceoff over city water fee plan," May 6). I will be very much surprised if any of it actually goes toward cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay. Neal Cohen, Reisterstown
NEWS
October 16, 2012
As a certified public accountant servicing small businesses and their owners, and cramming on the final extension tax deadline day of the year, I almost got excited when I saw the headline, "Businesses may see big 2013 tax drop" (Oct. 15). The article states how Maryland's unemployment tax may fall by 55 percent, and it goes on to gush that this will "give businesses a boost as they use that money for other purposes. " For my CPA firm (and for most of my clients), the Maryland unemployment tax makes up around 1 percent of my yearly payroll tax bill.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
National Harbor's hired expert on the gambling industry is predicting that the Cordish Cos.' Maryland Live! casino at Arundel Mills would enjoy an $84 million annual windfall from a gambling expansion plan favored by the developers of the Prince George's County complex. Predictably, Cordish Cos. chief executive David Cordish is not impressed Andrew J. Moody, head of Business Research and Economic Advisors, sent a report to a state-sponsored work group on gambling expansion, in which he projects that Maryland Live!
NEWS
December 28, 2011
I'm a Baltimore Country employee. I have worked for the county for 36 years. I drive a school bus and plan to retire in 2013 at the age of 62 if all goes well. I belong to the retirement system. Of course, I do not make the pay that the Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and two former councilmen receive ("A pension windfall," Dec. 18). I work had for my pay and a truck driver hauling beer makes more than I do, only I have a greater responsibility. Hopefully, my retirement check and Social Security check will keep me above water.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
Thank you for exposing the "sweetheart pension deal" that Baltimore County officials Kevin Kamenetz, Stephen G. Samuel Moxely, Vincent J. Gardina and Arnold Jablon, are receiving. For these county officials to draw or bank retirement benefits while continuing to work for the county is wrong. Not only are the retirement benefits they receive paid at a higher percentage than those of most county employees, the salaries that these officials are making (in addition to their sweetheart retirement benefits)
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,Morning Call | September 3, 2006
Some lottery winners go broke. Some athletes and entertainers amass millions and go bankrupt. Regular people every day squander inheritances, court settlements and salary bonuses. Why? Because it's hard to spend money well. And spending a windfall well is even harder. Windfalls, especially sizable ones, can be life-altering. They could provide a more comfortable lifestyle or blaze a path to self-destruction. Up to 70 percent of people who receive a large lump sum of money blow it in a few years, according to the National Endowment for Financial Education.
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | September 29, 1991
Depending on whom you talk to, the county government's disclosure that it has an extra $3.5-million surplus is either a sign of Harford'sthrift or extravagance.It has also renewed debate over whether county employees should get merit or step raises denied them earlier this year because of the county's worsening fiscal situation.County Executive Eileen Rehrmann last week announced that cash reserves of $9.8 million were left after fiscal year 1991 ended June 30.That's considerably higher than the $6.3 million rainy day fund Rehrmann created, saying it was needed to help Harford achieve a favorable bond rating when it goes to the bond market this year.
SPORTS
By Jeff Shain, Tribune Newspapers | May 5, 2011
The wind has been known to whip rather fiercely around golf's ancestral home, as anyone who saw Round 2 of last year's British Open can attest. As mist gave way to bright sunshine at St. Andrews, play was shut down for more than an hour when 35 mph gusts off the North Sea began pushing balls around the greens. That said, one has to wonder about the Machiavellian thought process that led some 19th Century rules-maker to penalize an ill gust. If the wind moves your ball while you're standing over it, it's a stroke.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2011
It's just the start of the evening rush, and the cars are everywhere — and going fast — outside Clarence "Sonny" Jordan's house on Ritchie Highway in Arnold. The 87-year-old has lived here since 1932 — before Ritchie Highway was built — and has been trying for years to sell his property. But there's a problem, he says: No one wants to buy a piece of residentially zoned property along a busy thoroughfare. So he wants to get his 51/2 acres of land rezoned from low-density residential to commercial, increasing its value and allowing for a comfortable retirement.
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