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Wind Tunnel

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By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | November 10, 1991
When Robert Foor-Hogue tells his science research students that the "only limitation is your imagination," they heed that philosophy.Why else would a serious student like Tim White have spent several hundred hours over the past two years researching and designing a wind tunnel -- a tunnel the senior might never see come to fruition?But with a mentor like Foor-Hogue and other successful student projects from which to take inspiration, limitation is not part of the classroom lesson in the South Carroll High science lab."
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Brendan Timothy Sullivan, a college student who enjoyed sports and music, died Monday of a cardiac arrest at his Marriottsville home. He was 19. Mr. Sullivan was born in Silver Spring and spent his early years in Hyattsville before moving to Marriottsville in 1999. He was a 2008 graduate of West Nottingham Academy in Colora, where the 6-foot-9-inch player was the varsity basketball team's center. His athletic prowess earned him the school's Best Male Athlete Award. At the time of his death, Mr. Sullivan was studying business at Howard Community College and the University of Phoenix.
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SPORTS
By Tom Higgins and Tom Higgins,Charlotte Observer | April 18, 1995
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- In recent years NASCAR has been far more open about its decisions and policies than a quarter-century back, when the sanctioning body's founder, Bill France Sr., ran a benevolent dictatorship.However, it borders on trying to break into Fort Knox to get information from NASCAR concerning last month's "comparison tests" of the three Winston Cup Series models -- the new Chevrolet Monte Carlo, Ford Thunderbird and Pontiac Grand Prix -- at wind tunnels in Georgia and Michigan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 21, 2010
One of the most enjoyable things about joining The Baltimore Sun staff 10 years ago was ending up with Elizabeth Large as my pod mate. Even though her desk was perpetually, maybe pathologically, clean, and mine perpetually and pathetically messy, we got along from the start. And even though there were many things we didn't have in common (she, the sports enthusiast, couldn't believe I didn't know who Ray Lewis was; I, the classical music nut, retaliated by drawing a blank stare when I asked her who Renée Fleming was)
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 2, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon's top general said yesterday that a key research facility at one of the five Maryland bases targeted for closure in the latest Pentagon cuts was "unique" and should "probably be retained."His comments raised the possibility of some relief for the local pain of the Pentagon base closures, announced Tuesday, which threaten 1,211 civilian jobs in the state.The facility employs about 70 of the 201 civilian workers facing the loss their jobs at the Naval Surface Warfare Center at White Oak, on the Montgomery-Prince George's County line, one of 146 bases the Pentagon proposes to close this year.
NEWS
By Jeff Long and Jeff Long,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 13, 2000
HAMPTON, Va. -- Ivy now snakes up the crumbling concrete walls of the wind tunnel where engineers once grappled with aviation's most complicated problems. Once at the cutting edge of American technology, now it has the look of an abandoned B-movie set. Old wooden pallets are scattered among knee-high weeds in this remote corner of Langley Air Force Base, overlooking the Southwest Branch of the Back River. It almost seems that no one has visited here since 1961, the year the NASA Langley Research Center deactivated its "8-Foot High-Speed Wind Tunnel."
NEWS
By Albert M. Hill and Albert M. Hill,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2004
What does it feel like to walk through a hurricane? What submarine design produces the least drag? Which sail catches the wind best? How much steel does a building need to stand up to strong gusts? Since 1949 scientists at the University of Maryland have been using the Glenn L. Martin Wind Tunnel in College Park to answer those questions and more. Shaped like a squared-off doughnut, the tunnel stirs up the air with a 20,000-horsepower fan with blades 20 feet in diameter that can generate wind speeds up to 230 mph. Ford Motor Co. uses the tunnel to help make its automobiles more aerodynamic and pays fees to the college, which help keep the tunnel self-supporting.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 18, 2006
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The only way to really test the safety of the space shuttle's redesigned external fuel tank is to fly, according to Discovery's astronauts, who said yesterday that they were eager for a May liftoff. "We will lose foam on this flight, just like every other," said commander Steven Lindsey, who could lead a crew into space as early as May or as late as July. "The key is to make sure that the foam we do lose is a small enough size so it can't hurt us if it hits the vehicle."
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2001
Two aeronautical engineers at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel say they've found a way to build better missiles, save taxpayer dollars and bring new business to the lab in one simple idea: use plastic. As part of an independent research project, Richard R. Heisler and Clifford L. Ratliff designed a way to make plastic models for use in wind tunnel tests that keep their integrity, provide quality data during the tests and shave tens of thousands of dollars off the cost of a typical wind tunnel experiment, as well as months of time.
SPORTS
By Christopher Clarey and Christopher Clarey,The New York Times | July 6, 2008
WIMBLEDON, England -- Sisters for life and doubles partners later in the afternoon, Venus and Serena Williams put all that aside for nearly two hours yesterday at Wimbledon, slugging serves and ground strokes in each other's direction with a vengeance. It had been five years since they had played a Grand Slam singles final together, and the long wait resulted in one of their most intense and entertaining matches despite the gusty conditions that made Centre Court feel more like a wind tunnel.
SPORTS
By Christopher Clarey and Christopher Clarey,The New York Times | July 6, 2008
WIMBLEDON, England -- Sisters for life and doubles partners later in the afternoon, Venus and Serena Williams put all that aside for nearly two hours yesterday at Wimbledon, slugging serves and ground strokes in each other's direction with a vengeance. It had been five years since they had played a Grand Slam singles final together, and the long wait resulted in one of their most intense and entertaining matches despite the gusty conditions that made Centre Court feel more like a wind tunnel.
NEWS
By MICHAEL CABBAGE and MICHAEL CABBAGE,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 29, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA managers said yesterday that there would be no more major safety changes to the space shuttle's external fuel tank until after the next planned launch in July. The decision follows a debate among engineers on whether to modify so-called ice-frost ramps on the tank's exterior before Discovery's coming flight. The small ramps are crafted from foam insulation that is sprayed by hand on the tank's exterior to prevent the buildup of ice. Concern remains among some engineers that in a worst-case scenario, pieces of the ramp weighing 2 or 3 ounces could break off during launch and hit the orbiter, causing critical damage.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 18, 2006
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The only way to really test the safety of the space shuttle's redesigned external fuel tank is to fly, according to Discovery's astronauts, who said yesterday that they were eager for a May liftoff. "We will lose foam on this flight, just like every other," said commander Steven Lindsey, who could lead a crew into space as early as May or as late as July. "The key is to make sure that the foam we do lose is a small enough size so it can't hurt us if it hits the vehicle."
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2004
When hurricanes start stalking America's Southeast coast, David Prevatt hopes that they hit one of his houses. Not one that the Clemson University engineer lives in, but one of the many he has wired from South Carolina to the panhandle of Florida to measure the stresses they face from extraordinarily high winds. Prevatt said that he takes no joy in the destruction and discomfort that these storms cause, but he cannot hide his pleasure when he records direct hits, as he did when Frances struck Florida on Sept.
NEWS
By Albert M. Hill and Albert M. Hill,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2004
What does it feel like to walk through a hurricane? What submarine design produces the least drag? Which sail catches the wind best? How much steel does a building need to stand up to strong gusts? Since 1949 scientists at the University of Maryland have been using the Glenn L. Martin Wind Tunnel in College Park to answer those questions and more. Shaped like a squared-off doughnut, the tunnel stirs up the air with a 20,000-horsepower fan with blades 20 feet in diameter that can generate wind speeds up to 230 mph. Ford Motor Co. uses the tunnel to help make its automobiles more aerodynamic and pays fees to the college, which help keep the tunnel self-supporting.
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2004
MOUNT WASHINGTON, N.H. - It took a precise blend of geography and weather, an exquisite cocktail of natural elements, to produce a gust of 231 mph. Call it the perfect wind. This world-record blast of air, set 70 years ago today, has withstood challenges from legions of hurricanes and typhoons. It is the bedrock of a reputation that allows 6,288-foot Mount Washington to boast, "Home of the World's Worst Weather." "It had to happen somewhere, but that it happened where it did surprises people," says Bryan Yeaton, the folksy host of the nationally syndicated radio show The Weather Notebook.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Brendan Timothy Sullivan, a college student who enjoyed sports and music, died Monday of a cardiac arrest at his Marriottsville home. He was 19. Mr. Sullivan was born in Silver Spring and spent his early years in Hyattsville before moving to Marriottsville in 1999. He was a 2008 graduate of West Nottingham Academy in Colora, where the 6-foot-9-inch player was the varsity basketball team's center. His athletic prowess earned him the school's Best Male Athlete Award. At the time of his death, Mr. Sullivan was studying business at Howard Community College and the University of Phoenix.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2004
One tree and a tangle of branches. That's all Tropical Storm Isabel's winds took from the Naval Academy's sprawling, 338-acre grounds when it ripped through Annapolis in September. When Isabel's 8-foot storm surge flooded into the school's academic buildings and laboratories, however, it knocked out more than $20 million worth of sophisticated electronic equipment. Six months later, the Naval Academy is still without some of its most prized apparatus -- from lasers and microscopes to a 380-foot towing tank used for testing models of ships and submarines -- as the $68.2 million that Congress allocated for the school's recovery effort continues to trickle in. "These were large pieces of gear with the kind of instrumentation that gets toasted by salty water," said Michael C. Halbig, associate dean for faculty and a member of the academy's restoration team.
NEWS
May 25, 2003
Board of Education to hold business meeting The Carroll County Board of Education will hold a business meeting starting at 1 p.m. Wednesday in Room 007 of the board offices in Westminster. A work session on healthy schools will be held at 2 p.m. The regular meeting agenda will be posted on the school system's website at www.carr.org/ccps. The meeting will be broadcast live on CETV, Adelphia Cable Channel 21, and repeated at 8 p.m. Thursday. The board offices are at 125 N. Court St. Information: 410- 751-3020.
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