Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWind Shear
IN THE NEWS

Wind Shear

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1995
The local Westinghouse Electric Corp. division has won federal approval to market a radar system designed to detect and warn pilots of wind shear, which has been the cause of several commercial airline crashes.James Reinhard, a Westinghouse spokesman, said the "preventive" system can detect wind shear from a distance of up to 10 miles, which would give pilots up to 90 seconds to steer a new course.Some planes are currently equipped with "reactive" systems that warn pilots when they are caught in wind shear.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2012
As Hurricane Michael and Tropical Storm Leslie churn in the Atlantic with only limited impact on land expected, a new storm system is moving toward North America in the middle of the ocean. The system, about 850 miles west of Africa's Cape Verde Islands, has a 90 percent likelihood of becoming a tropical cyclone in the next 48 hours. That would make it the 14th named storm of the season, to be dubbed Nadine. It's too early to predict where the storm could be headed. It's currently moving west-northwestward at 15 to 20 mph. Leslie and Michael are both headed northward, with Leslie making a brush with eastern Canada on Tuesday.
Advertisement
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 6, 1994
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Shortly after the pilots tried to abort their landing amid torrential rains and gusting winds, USAir Flight 1016 was slammed to earth in a way consistent with what a wind shear would cause, according to a National Transportation Safety Board spokesman.A board member, John Hammerschmidt, also described to a press briefing last night the desperate efforts of crew members to gain altitude around Saturday. The jet, a DC-9-30, experienced "a severe sink rate" just after it veered to the right and tried to circle Charlotte/Douglas International Airport, Mr. Hammerschmidt said, and crashed, killing 37 people and injuring 20.Interviews conducted with the pilot and first officer yesterday, along with information from the cockpit voice recorder, tower communications and other data have allowed investigators to put together a chilling chronology of every traveler's worst nightmare: a sudden, vicious storm that kicks up at almost the instant a plane is thundering in for a landing and brings catastrophe.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
Tropical Storm Michael, the 13th named storm of the hurricane season, has formed in the Atlantic as of 11 a.m. Tuesday. The storm poses no threat to land at the moment. Tropical Storm Leslie, meanwhile, is struggling to Michael's west but could still become a hurricane that could affect Bermuda. Michael had 40 mph winds as of Tuesday morning, and was 1,200 miles southwest of the Azores, in the middle of the ocean. The storm is expected to move slowly northward but isn't much of a concern.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | October 14, 1992
It may look like a giant golf ball, but the new weather radar that federal officials want to build along the Severn River is no toy. The dome-covered radar tower the Federal Aviation Administration has proposed would detect"wind shear," dangerous shifts in wind direction and velocity involved in several recent airplane crashes.Wind shear "can effectively slam a plane into the ground," said Mark Miglietta, associate programmer for the FAA's seven-state eastern region. "It's like flying into a tornado."
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby , and Ted Shelsby | July 27, 1991
Two of the nation's worst commercial air disasters of the past 10 years -- the crash of a Delta Airlines jumbo jet at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport in 1985 that took 137 lives and the 1982 downing of a Pan American World Airways jet in New Orleans that killed 146 -- were blamed on the same thing: wind shear.Wind shear is a weather condition that involves the sudden and dramatic change in wind direction that can push a plane to the ground. Engineers at the Westinghouse Electric Corp.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1993
The local Westinghouse Electronic Systems Group announced the sale of its first wind shear detection radar to a commercial airline yesterday.Miami-based cargo carrier Arrow Air and parent International Air Leases Inc. have ordered 20 MR-3000 radar systems from the Westinghouse unit based in Linthicum, with an option for 100 more.Arrow President Richard Haberly said the units cost about $100,000 each, and the full order would likely exceed $10 million. He said the radar warns pilots when they are flying into wind shear conditions in time to change their course.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The National Transportation Safety Board concluded yesterday that USAir Flight 1016 crashed in Charlotte, N.C., on July 2 because air traffic controllers failed to pass along crucial weather information, the crew failed to recognize signs of wind shear and, at the crucial moment, the apparently disoriented captain told his first officer to push the nose of the plane down when it should have been climbing.The findings were approved at a seven-hour meeting to establish the cause of the crash, which killed 37 people and injured 20 others aboard the USAir DC-9.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 2, 2012
The Atlantic hurricane season could be in for a jolt in the next few weeks, at least according to AccuWeather. It has been more than a month since Tropical Storm Debby dissipated after drenching Florida and moving out to sea. The lull could soon end -- what is being called Tropical Depression Five is expected to become Tropical Storm Ernesto some time on Friday, according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm is anticipated to impact the Lesser Antilles in the southern Caribbean on Friday and potentially Jamaica by Monday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
Tropical Storm Michael, the 13th named storm of the hurricane season, has formed in the Atlantic as of 11 a.m. Tuesday. The storm poses no threat to land at the moment. Tropical Storm Leslie, meanwhile, is struggling to Michael's west but could still become a hurricane that could affect Bermuda. Michael had 40 mph winds as of Tuesday morning, and was 1,200 miles southwest of the Azores, in the middle of the ocean. The storm is expected to move slowly northward but isn't much of a concern.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 2, 2012
The Atlantic hurricane season could be in for a jolt in the next few weeks, at least according to AccuWeather. It has been more than a month since Tropical Storm Debby dissipated after drenching Florida and moving out to sea. The lull could soon end -- what is being called Tropical Depression Five is expected to become Tropical Storm Ernesto some time on Friday, according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm is anticipated to impact the Lesser Antilles in the southern Caribbean on Friday and potentially Jamaica by Monday.
NEWS
By Andrew C. Revkin and Andrew C. Revkin,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 22, 2001
The Atlantic Seaboard and the Caribbean face 10 to 40 years of stronger and more frequent hurricanes, a new analysis of weather data shows. As a result, crowded coastlines and islands are confronted with the greatest risk of devastation in a generation, said the scientists who conducted the study. Many meteorologists said the new analysis provided the firmest evidence yet that cycles in ocean and atmospheric conditions that suppressed big storms from 1971 to 1994 had shifted into a storm-spawning state.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1995
The local Westinghouse Electric Corp. division has won federal approval to market a radar system designed to detect and warn pilots of wind shear, which has been the cause of several commercial airline crashes.James Reinhard, a Westinghouse spokesman, said the "preventive" system can detect wind shear from a distance of up to 10 miles, which would give pilots up to 90 seconds to steer a new course.Some planes are currently equipped with "reactive" systems that warn pilots when they are caught in wind shear.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 15, 1995
NEW YORK -- The FBI and New York City police are investigating an explosion that blew out part of the wind-shear detection system serving La Guardia Airport on Friday afternoon. The blast caused no air-traffic control problems, but raised concerns about who might have set off the device and why.A one-page handwritten note found at the site linked the incident to the federal raid on the Branch Davidian compound near Waco, Texas, in February 1993. "This is in response to the Waco incident, for all our fallen brothers," the note read.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 15, 1995
NEW YORK -- The FBI and New York City police are investigating an explosion that blew out part of the wind-shear detection system serving La Guardia Airport on Friday afternoon.The blast caused no air-traffic control problems but raised concerns about who might have set off the device and why. A one-page handwritten note found at the site linked the incident to the federal raid on the Branch Davidian compound near Waco, Texas, in February 1993."This is in response to the Waco incident, for all our fallen brothers," the note read.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The National Transportation Safety Board concluded yesterday that USAir Flight 1016 crashed in Charlotte, N.C., on July 2 because air traffic controllers failed to pass along crucial weather information, the crew failed to recognize signs of wind shear and, at the crucial moment, the apparently disoriented captain told his first officer to push the nose of the plane down when it should have been climbing.The findings were approved at a seven-hour meeting to establish the cause of the crash, which killed 37 people and injured 20 others aboard the USAir DC-9.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2012
As Hurricane Michael and Tropical Storm Leslie churn in the Atlantic with only limited impact on land expected, a new storm system is moving toward North America in the middle of the ocean. The system, about 850 miles west of Africa's Cape Verde Islands, has a 90 percent likelihood of becoming a tropical cyclone in the next 48 hours. That would make it the 14th named storm of the season, to be dubbed Nadine. It's too early to predict where the storm could be headed. It's currently moving west-northwestward at 15 to 20 mph. Leslie and Michael are both headed northward, with Leslie making a brush with eastern Canada on Tuesday.
NEWS
By Andrew C. Revkin and Andrew C. Revkin,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 22, 2001
The Atlantic Seaboard and the Caribbean face 10 to 40 years of stronger and more frequent hurricanes, a new analysis of weather data shows. As a result, crowded coastlines and islands are confronted with the greatest risk of devastation in a generation, said the scientists who conducted the study. Many meteorologists said the new analysis provided the firmest evidence yet that cycles in ocean and atmospheric conditions that suppressed big storms from 1971 to 1994 had shifted into a storm-spawning state.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 26, 1995
WASHINGTON -- American Eagle Flight 4184 had been holding for 32 minutes in a chilly drizzle last October when air traffic controllers in Chicago cleared the pilots to make a routine descent from 10,000 to 8,000 feet.Although the pilots did not know it, a dangerous ridge of ice had built up on the wings, and in a fraction of a second, to their complete and ultimately final terror, the pilots lost control of the ATR-72 turbo prop.The plane's controls moved on their own, tilting the right wing almost perpendicular to the ground.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 18, 1994
When Transportation Secretary Federico Pena meets next month with hundreds of airline employees and other aviation experts, a basic question will be on the table: What is being done to improve airline safety?The question is rarely raised in so public a forum. But it has been several years since travelers have had so much cause to ask: "Another crash? What caused it?"So with the growing unease about flying, heightened after an American Eagle plane crashed near Raleigh, N.C., last week -- the nation's fifth fatal crash of an airliner this year -- public pressure appears to have prompted the call for overarching answers about how the industry is trying to reduce accidents.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.