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By Los Angeles Times | May 3, 1992
COPENHAGEN, Denmark -- The Danish government is pushing ahead with one of Europe's most ambitious alternative-energy projects, a program that would make Denmark the first country to use wind power as a significant contributor to its national electricity grid.In a report in February, the Danish Environment Ministry set out a planning procedure for building additional windmills either in clustered parks or as individual free-standing units, bringing municipal governments into the decision-making process for the first time.
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NEWS
June 27, 2014
Regarding your recent editorial on the impact of climate change on the economy, I agree that resolving the issue of climate change would not be an economic failure but rather a success ( "The economic climate ," June 24). Aside from the fact that if climate change is ignored the situation of the economy will become an issue of infinitely less importance than the condition of our planet, exploring solutions to the problem will open many opportunities to improve the economy. At current rates of consumption, there is an estimated 50 years of oil left in Earth's crust.
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NEWS
January 13, 2012
Thank you for publishing OpinionWorks' poll results on offshore wind in Maryland ("Public favors offshore wind power, poll says," Jan. 11). Count me among the majority of people who agree that $2 is a trivial price to pay for the many advantages that wind power provides, including relief from our dependence on fossil fuels and mitigation of the resulting global warming. I was further gratified to read that support was not reduced in areas within sight of the turbines. When compared to the severe health, environmental and economic costs of coal-fired power plants (especially to those unfortunate enough to live nearby)
NEWS
April 24, 2014
Tom Vinson's and Bruce Burcat's arguments ( "A wind-win situation," April 21) asking Gov. Martin O'Malley to veto House Bill 1168, which places a temporary moratorium on the construction of wind turbines in Somerset County, suffers from the misleading arguments often used by promoters of renewable power. First, wind speed on the Chesapeake Bay's Eastern Shore is just adequate for commercial exploitation. The builders constantly refer to 150 megawatts of generation capacity, but this is the maximum or "nameplate" capacity, which is available only when the wind is strong.
NEWS
March 10, 2010
In his recent opinion piece, Jon Boone has once again let his bias against wind power stand in the way of sanity ("The fantasy of wind power for Maryland," March 8). Just as with his numerous lawsuits against widely-supported, economically important projects for Western Maryland, he has once again cast his wide "just say no" net to include offshore wind as well. Wind turbines will benefit Maryland, whether on land in Garrett County or in the water off Ocean City. They can provide much-needed tax revenue for communities, significant income to landowners and valuable clean energy to consumers that demand it -- all with little environmental impact.
NEWS
January 19, 2012
Count me among the minority. I don't favor adding $2 to our utility bills to pay for wind mills ("Public favors offshore wind power, poll says," Jan. 11). While I'm in favor of wind power and yes, $2 is not that much, let's look at what is really happening here. Electricity generated by any source is not delivered directly to the consumer. It is sold to brokers on the open market who then resell it to the highest bidder. So what that $2 will actually do is make the electricity cheaper to the brokers while people on fixed incomes or no income will be subsidizing rich energy brokers.
NEWS
February 12, 2010
Timothy Wheeler's article ("Study boosts offshore windmills," Feb. 9) presents an exciting prospect for Maryland. Offshore wind energy is just the sort of project that people can get behind, regardless of political leanings. Maryland has the opportunity to become a national leader in clean energy and fighting climate change while creating green jobs. There may be some drawbacks to this plan, but it is still far more appealing than increasing consumption of coal, oil or nuclear power.
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BY ALLAN VOUGHT | October 13, 2011
A study in Harford County could tell farmers if there's enough sustained wind strength to economically generate electricity for their operations. For the past year, a farm in Black Horse, on the northwestern side of the county, has been home to a temporary measuring station, an anemometer perched on a 100-meter tower that captures wind speed and directional data that is in turn stored on a computer. The measuring equipment is owned by the nonprofit Harford County Agricultural Marketing Cooperative, and the data is being collected and analyzed by the Maryland Environmental Service under contract with the cooperative.
NEWS
April 29, 2010
It is too bad that Timothy Wheeler failed to mention in Thursday's article "Offshore wind farm wins OK" (April 29) the enormous costs of offshore wind, requiring huge tax subsidies, or the fact that wind turbines will do very little to offset carbon emissions due to wind's intermittency, or that birds are not the only species that will be impacted. Ajax Eastman, Baltimore
NEWS
April 6, 2012
Many recent op-eds in The Sun have discussed Gov.Martin O'Malley's wind bill. To those concerned about the cost of wind energy, I would observe that doing nothing might prove even more expensive in the long run. While installing the wind turbines may raise residential electricity rates by as much as $1.50 a month, it will benefit Maryland and the world by using more renewable energy. Wind energy is beneficial to Maryland in many ways: it is renewable, it pollutes less, it is not expensive, it provides a lot of energy, it will reduce U.S. dependence on imported fuels and it will create local jobs.
NEWS
April 20, 2014
For Southern Maryland, the Patuxent River Naval Air Station is an economic engine like no other. It accounts for $6.6 billion in economic activity, including 41,185 jobs, so it's small wonder that elected leaders from that region of the state are extremely protective of it, and that includes House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer. But at what cost? One of the more curious events of the most recent General Assembly session was the passage of legislation that would bar the Maryland Public Service Commission from approving a wind-powered generating facility between now and July 1 of next year within a 56-mile radius of the Navy base.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Hundreds of acres of Maryland farmland that are protected from development at taxpayer expense could be turned into commercial wind or solar energy farms under legislation before the General Assembly. Farm groups and the O'Malley administration support the move, which they say could help struggling farmers stay viable while boosting prospects for "clean" renewable energy. Bills pending in House and Senate committees would let landowners who have sold their development rights to the state use up to 5 acres each for generating electricity from wind, sunshine or even decomposing animal and crop waste.
NEWS
December 22, 2013
BGE customers may not be thrilled with the news of the last two weeks. On Dec. 13, the Public Service Commission approved not only gas and electric distribution rate increases for the utility but it also took the unprecedented step of allowing the company to add a surcharge to residents' bills to cover future grid reliability initiatives. And on Tuesday, the Obama administration announced plans to auction the rights to build offshore wind turbines off the Ocean City coast, a project that would add yet another surcharge to Marylander's monthly electric bills.
NEWS
August 5, 2013
The letters in support of Gov. Martin O'Malley's greenhouse gas reduction plan show an amazing ignorance of the facts (" O'Malley says state has 'moral obligation' to avert climate change," July 25). The U.S. uses 4,000 billion kilowatt hours per year. In 2011, 1.8 billion kWh - or 0.05 percent - was produced from solar energy and just 120 billion kWh - or 3 percent - from wind. This after hundreds of billions of dollars in federal subsidies, including ($24 billion in 2011 alone)
NEWS
June 13, 2013
Charles Campbell, a retired executive with Gulf Oil, once again gets the facts wrong in his latest attempt to attack wind energy ("Nuclear power is good for the environment," May 28). First, Mr. Campbell falsely claims that Denmark has not seen a reduction in pollution as it has ramped up its use of wind energy. That could not be further from the truth. Denmark's electric sector carbon dioxide emissions are down 21 percent over the last decade, from 16.5 million tons in 1999 to 13 million tons in 2009, even though electricity use increased.
NEWS
June 4, 2013
In a recent letter to the editor, Charles Campbell rehashes tired talking points and cherry picks data to attack proven renewable energy sources like wind and solar power ("Nuclear is greenest," May 28). The old-school reliability concerns Mr. Campbell raises are most often voiced by fossil fuel companies - not the grid operators responsible for keeping the lights on. The "comprehensive study of U.S. wind power" that Mr. Campbell references is, in reality, based on data from four days in Colorado that was commissioned by the Independent Petroleum Association of the Mountain States.
NEWS
May 8, 2011
One can only imagine how bad an idea ("The problem with wind," May 6) was Governor Martin O'Malley's signature piece of legislation promoting off-shore wind turbines when he couldn't get it past a one-party (his own) legislature, in a one-party (again, his own) state filled with left-leaning, liberal loonies. Dave Reich, Perry Hall
NEWS
May 28, 2013
Tom Horton's recent commentary on nuclear energy is excellent and provides the beginning of a rational discussion of green energy in Maryland ("Embracing nukes," May 23). He includes data which shows that wind farms on average operate at 30 percent of design capacity versus 90 percent for nuclear power. Solar power systems operate on average at 15 percent of design capacity. Wind and sun power are erratic. Nuclear plants operate constantly, and the 90 percent utilization factor is due to planned maintenance.
NEWS
By Tom Horton | May 22, 2013
For too long, many environmentalists have been ambivalent about nuclear energy. It conjures fears: meltdowns, cancers, Chernobyl, Fukushima, overtones of nuclear bombs. Yet, we also know that nuclear power provides 70 percent of all the greenhouse gas-free electrical power in the United States (hydropower, in which dams block many great rivers like the Susquehanna to fish migration, provides much of the rest). Neither does nuclear energy produce the nitrogen oxides of fossil fuels that are a major Chesapeake pollutant, or the mercury from coal plants that contaminate so much of our seafood.
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