Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWind Farms
IN THE NEWS

Wind Farms

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 6, 2011
Welcome to 21 s t -century energy, and none too soon considering Mother Nature's rebellion against our human treatment of her precious jewel, the Earth! Coal energy was a brilliant idea in the 1700s as nuclear was in the 1900s. Welcome to the new energy supply of wind and sun which is coming today, tomorrow, or very, very soon. The naysayers will only be heard for so long before an idea whose time has come will be here! Once wind farms are in place, beautiful, natural wind will be practically free.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
WASHINGTON -- Citing "very serious" concerns about the project's impact on Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski included language in a military spending bill that would delay the construction of a massive wind farm on the Eastern Shore. The provision, if approved, would halt the project despite efforts by Gov. Martin O'Malley this year to move it forward. O'Malley, a fellow Democrat, vetoed state legislation in May that would have imposed a 15-month moratorium on the construction of land-based wind farms.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 25, 2011
Coverage of the offshore wind power legislation has missed one key point ("O'Malley wind plan meets resistance" March 24). The cost of wind power will remain constant over time. Because the wind is free, the price of electricity from wind turbines will not go up and down like a seesaw every time the market for fossil fuels has a hiccup. We have been gambling with our energy prices for too long by remaining overly dependent on fossil fuels and failing to develop alternative sources of power.
NEWS
May 3, 2014
One can always hear a great "spin" in a story, particularly when the authors are activists for a cause. I refer to the commentary concerning wind turbines in Somerset County ( "A wind-win situation," April 21). Authors Tom Vinson and Bruce Burcat are paid individuals whose job is to promote wind and renewable energy regardless of some factual information. First, the $200 million dollar project is a number that has somehow appeared with little actual data behind it. Sounds good though.
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | December 26, 2007
With ominous global warming accelerating year after year, why can't Maryland construct a single clean-energy wind farm within its borders? Gov. Martin O'Malley's blue-ribbon commission says we must get off fossil fuel very soon. But our state - one of the most vulnerable in America to global warming and one of the most politically liberal - can't achieve even the baby step of a single commercial wind farm. What's the problem? West Virginia has dozens of wind turbines; Pennsylvania even more.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN REPORTER | January 29, 2008
Business and political leaders in Western Maryland's Garrett County are lining up against a proposal to allow the clearing of up to 400 mountaintop acres of state forest for the construction of 40-story wind turbines. With a pair of public hearings scheduled this week, Garrett's Chamber of Commerce, Board of Realtors, Democratic Central Committee and Republican state delegate and senator have come out against the proposal to use two state forests in the county for wind farms. So has the mayor of the town of Oakland.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | January 31, 2008
MCHENRY -- An overflow crowd of about 500 people packed a public hearing in Western Maryland last night, most of them strongly opposed to a proposal to allow wind turbines in state forests. "It's the very character of the mountains and the state forests that define who we are," said state Del. Wendell R. Beitzel, a Republican from Garrett County. "I beseech you to relay to the governor and other people that we don't want wind turbines on our land." Pennsylvania-based U.S. Wind Force is proposing to build about 100 turbines in the Savage River and Potomac state forests in Garrett County.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN REPORTER | December 6, 2007
A Pennsylvania company is asking the O'Malley administration for leases in two Western Maryland state forests so it can clear up to 400 mountaintop acres to build about 100 wind turbines. The U.S. Wind Force structures would be about 40 stories tall and visible from some of the region's most popular tourist areas, including Deep Creek Lake and the Savage River Reservoir.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2002
State environmental officials have endorsed plans to build Maryland's first wind farms on ridgetops in Allegany and Garrett counties, despite fears from ornithologists that the towers and rotating blades could cause major bird kills. The Department of Natural Resources recommended that the state Public Service Commission approve the wind farms, which could begin operating next year atop mountains near Oakland and Cumberland. John Sherwell, director of DNR's Power Plant Research Program, said his recommendation this month comes after reviews by eight state agencies of two projects being promoted as a clean source of power and a "constructive addition" to the state's power system.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2004
Maryland is poised to get its first electricity-generating windmills sometime next year, now that Congress has renewed a federal tax credit that is enabling commercial wind farm developers to push ahead with stalled projects. Most of the nation's planned wind energy projects - including at least two that would bring up to 92 turbines to Western Maryland's mountains - had been on hold for nearly a year as developers awaited the fate of the expired Production Tax Credit, viewed by the industry as a critical piece of financing.
NEWS
May 3, 2014
As the developers of the proposed Somerset County wind farm, we feel compelled to respond to the blatant - and seemingly intentional - factual misstatements put forth in recent letters to the editor by opponents of our investment. We acknowledge that rotating wind turbines have the potential to create interference with the radar testing systems at the Patuxent Naval Air Station. But the extensive study by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Lincoln Laboratories funded by Pax River concluded that's there's a simple solution to the potential interference: Don't allow the turbines to operate when the Navy wants to do its radar testing.
NEWS
April 28, 2014
The insidious piece of legislation to temporarily ban a wind farm in Somerset County is an appalling example of the politics of special interests at work ( "Gone with the wind farm?" April 20). The bill is completely unnecessary to protect the mission of Patuxent River Naval Air Station or, for that matter, the bottom lines of the defense contractors who are behind it. What the bill does do is to give one region of the state, an affluent area, veto power over the economic development of another area, which happens to be its poorest.
NEWS
April 28, 2014
Regarding The Sun's editorial asking Gov. Martin O'Malley to veto a bill that would delay approval of a wind farm in Somerset County ( "Gone with the wind farm?" April 20), I take offense at you describing industrial turbines as "windmills. " That's like calling a mountain lion a house cat. Next, when there were 60 turbines in the project a year ago, there were 500 construction jobs and 14.6 permanent jobs. Now that it has been changed to 29 turbines (or 25 depending on who is giving you the numbers)
NEWS
April 27, 2014
The recent letter in The Sun, "Wind farm not worth the risk to Pax River " (April 24), clouds the discussion. Writer Norman Meadow seems to suggest that the wind farm is a poor business investment. The backers of the project must think otherwise. The only way to know for sure would be to build it. The true importance of the wind farm is that it shows that the state of Maryland recognizes there is a problem with the use of fossil fuel and is willing to take a chance on solving it. If we show that we think something can or should be done, perhaps other people will follow our lead.
NEWS
April 23, 2014
In response to the April 21 commentary regarding the proposed wind farm in Somerset County ( "A wind-win situation" , Pioneer Green (aka Great Bay Wind) claims that they have conducted studies showing that the proposed 600-foot-tall industrial wind turbines proposed for the county will not negatively impact Patuxent River naval station radar operations. During the state Senate hearing on April 1, it was clear after much testimony that included input from representatives of Pioneer Green that members of the delegation did not agree with their claim of due diligence.
NEWS
April 20, 2014
For Southern Maryland, the Patuxent River Naval Air Station is an economic engine like no other. It accounts for $6.6 billion in economic activity, including 41,185 jobs, so it's small wonder that elected leaders from that region of the state are extremely protective of it, and that includes House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer. But at what cost? One of the more curious events of the most recent General Assembly session was the passage of legislation that would bar the Maryland Public Service Commission from approving a wind-powered generating facility between now and July 1 of next year within a 56-mile radius of the Navy base.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | October 12, 2007
A New Jersey-based company wants to build about 150 wind turbines, each more than 40 stories tall, in the Atlantic Ocean 12 miles from the tourist-packed beaches of Ocean City. Bluewater Wind proposed a similar project last year off Delaware, which could be the nation's first offshore wind farm if it receives state and federal approvals. The developers presented the broad outlines of their concept for Maryland's coast yesterday during a closed-door meeting with members of the state Public Service Commission.
NEWS
April 7, 2014
Regarding your editorial about a bill that would block development of wind energy projects in Somerset County, this legislation is so unnecessary ( "The legislature's to-do list," April 3). The Navy is quite capable of making it's own decision. This is money from defense contractors talking. Why should Southern Maryland have the right to tell people on the Eastern Shore what to do with our land? Mary Ann Peterman, Marion - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.