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NEWS
April 27, 2014
The recent letter in The Sun, "Wind farm not worth the risk to Pax River " (April 24), clouds the discussion. Writer Norman Meadow seems to suggest that the wind farm is a poor business investment. The backers of the project must think otherwise. The only way to know for sure would be to build it. The true importance of the wind farm is that it shows that the state of Maryland recognizes there is a problem with the use of fossil fuel and is willing to take a chance on solving it. If we show that we think something can or should be done, perhaps other people will follow our lead.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
WASHINGTON -- Citing "very serious" concerns about the project's impact on Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski included language in a military spending bill that would delay the construction of a massive wind farm on the Eastern Shore. The provision, if approved, would halt the project despite efforts by Gov. Martin O'Malley this year to move it forward. O'Malley, a fellow Democrat, vetoed state legislation in May that would have imposed a 15-month moratorium on the construction of land-based wind farms.
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NEWS
March 6, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal to require Maryland utilities to buy electricity at above market rates from wind turbines located in the Atlantic Ocean may create a nice green credential for an aspiring national politician, but it would be bad for Maryland ("O'Malley wind plan draws questions," March 4). The proposal would require every Marylander to pay more for energy than would be the case if utilities could buy electricity on the open market. In effect, it is a tax on energy with the tax proceeds going to the wind farm developers.
NEWS
May 3, 2014
One can always hear a great "spin" in a story, particularly when the authors are activists for a cause. I refer to the commentary concerning wind turbines in Somerset County ( "A wind-win situation," April 21). Authors Tom Vinson and Bruce Burcat are paid individuals whose job is to promote wind and renewable energy regardless of some factual information. First, the $200 million dollar project is a number that has somehow appeared with little actual data behind it. Sounds good though.
NEWS
March 31, 2011
As a long-of-tooth energy engineer and consultant, I believe Jay Hancock 's offshore wind column is nearsighted ( "Stop O'Malley's offshore wind folly now, not later," March 27). Yes, natural gas currently is abundant and cheap, particularly compared to oil-based fuels, but it won't stay so. Natural gas is too flexible and easy to use, which translates into fuel switching for major users and new uses for compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) and so forth.
NEWS
May 3, 2014
One can always hear a great "spin" in a story, particularly when the authors are activists for a cause. I refer to the commentary concerning wind turbines in Somerset County ( "A wind-win situation," April 21). Authors Tom Vinson and Bruce Burcat are paid individuals whose job is to promote wind and renewable energy regardless of some factual information. First, the $200 million dollar project is a number that has somehow appeared with little actual data behind it. Sounds good though.
NEWS
April 28, 2014
The insidious piece of legislation to temporarily ban a wind farm in Somerset County is an appalling example of the politics of special interests at work ( "Gone with the wind farm?" April 20). The bill is completely unnecessary to protect the mission of Patuxent River Naval Air Station or, for that matter, the bottom lines of the defense contractors who are behind it. What the bill does do is to give one region of the state, an affluent area, veto power over the economic development of another area, which happens to be its poorest.
NEWS
March 25, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley's aide Joseph C. Bryce says that Maryland is in a race with other states to host offshore wind farms ("O'Malley wind plan meets resistance," March 24). How is this a race? What does the winner get? The "losers" will gain a lot of free experience, but I fail to see the advantage of being first. What's the rush, isn't there enough wind for all? There certainly is in Annapolis! David Plaut, Reisterstown
NEWS
February 15, 2011
While the concept of a large scale wind farm off the coast of Ocean City is an ambitious and inviting project, our state representatives and citizens need to seriously consider any unintended negative effects before committing to such an endeavor. First of all it is important to address any concerns about the safety of our migratory birds in the flyway off our coast. Wind turbines have been responsible for bird strikes, and we must be sure we continue to ensure their safety. Having attended the Wind Vision Conference on December 4th, I was very encouraged when guest speaker Robert Mitchell, the CEO of Trans Atlantic Development Company, stated that in order to protect all migratory birds and other marine life, the wind farm has to be at least 15 miles offshore.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2010
Some environmentalists and local residents have warned they will sue to block a western Maryland wind farm, saying the large commercial turbines will "almost certainly" kill rare bats. Save Western Maryland, the Maryland Conservation Council and several residents issued the warning in a letter last week to Synergics Wind Energy LLlC and others involved with the Roth Rock wind energy project near Oakland in Garrett County. The opponents contend the turbines to be built will harm Indiana bats and Virginia big-eared bats, both of which are protected by the federal Endangered Species Act. The July 20 letter calls on Synergics to halt or delay construction of its 30 turbines until it can obtain an "incidental take" permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for any bats that may be harmed.
NEWS
May 3, 2014
As the developers of the proposed Somerset County wind farm, we feel compelled to respond to the blatant - and seemingly intentional - factual misstatements put forth in recent letters to the editor by opponents of our investment. We acknowledge that rotating wind turbines have the potential to create interference with the radar testing systems at the Patuxent Naval Air Station. But the extensive study by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Lincoln Laboratories funded by Pax River concluded that's there's a simple solution to the potential interference: Don't allow the turbines to operate when the Navy wants to do its radar testing.
NEWS
April 29, 2014
I'd like to respond to the several articles, opinion pieces and letters addressing the topic of wind turbines in Somerset County ( "Gone with the wind farm?" April 20). Do the math. Reporters, editors and readers should question the claims of Pioneer Green. First, take a look at any U.S. wind energy map. There is hardly any wind in Maryland, especially compared to states where wind energy has a solid foothold. That is why Pioneer Green seeks to install turbines 100 feet higher than any other turbines approved by the Federal Aviation Administration.
NEWS
April 28, 2014
The insidious piece of legislation to temporarily ban a wind farm in Somerset County is an appalling example of the politics of special interests at work ( "Gone with the wind farm?" April 20). The bill is completely unnecessary to protect the mission of Patuxent River Naval Air Station or, for that matter, the bottom lines of the defense contractors who are behind it. What the bill does do is to give one region of the state, an affluent area, veto power over the economic development of another area, which happens to be its poorest.
NEWS
April 28, 2014
Regarding The Sun's editorial asking Gov. Martin O'Malley to veto a bill that would delay approval of a wind farm in Somerset County ( "Gone with the wind farm?" April 20), I take offense at you describing industrial turbines as "windmills. " That's like calling a mountain lion a house cat. Next, when there were 60 turbines in the project a year ago, there were 500 construction jobs and 14.6 permanent jobs. Now that it has been changed to 29 turbines (or 25 depending on who is giving you the numbers)
NEWS
April 28, 2014
As the former director of the Atlantic Test Ranges at Patuxent River, Maryland I have been reading with interest the various articles related to the effects of wind turbines on instrumentation radar systems located at this facility. I am a recognized national expert on test range operations with over 40 years of experience in this field. I would like to let the public know that wind turbine development on the Eastern Shore is a real encroachment threat to sensitive test measurements performed by the Navy at Patuxent River.
NEWS
April 27, 2014
The recent letter in The Sun, "Wind farm not worth the risk to Pax River " (April 24), clouds the discussion. Writer Norman Meadow seems to suggest that the wind farm is a poor business investment. The backers of the project must think otherwise. The only way to know for sure would be to build it. The true importance of the wind farm is that it shows that the state of Maryland recognizes there is a problem with the use of fossil fuel and is willing to take a chance on solving it. If we show that we think something can or should be done, perhaps other people will follow our lead.
NEWS
April 23, 2014
In response to the April 21 commentary regarding the proposed wind farm in Somerset County ( "A wind-win situation" , Pioneer Green (aka Great Bay Wind) claims that they have conducted studies showing that the proposed 600-foot-tall industrial wind turbines proposed for the county will not negatively impact Patuxent River naval station radar operations. During the state Senate hearing on April 1, it was clear after much testimony that included input from representatives of Pioneer Green that members of the delegation did not agree with their claim of due diligence.
NEWS
April 23, 2014
In response to the April 21 commentary regarding the proposed wind farm in Somerset County ( "A wind-win situation" , Pioneer Green (aka Great Bay Wind) claims that they have conducted studies showing that the proposed 600-foot-tall industrial wind turbines proposed for the county will not negatively impact Patuxent River naval station radar operations. During the state Senate hearing on April 1, it was clear after much testimony that included input from representatives of Pioneer Green that members of the delegation did not agree with their claim of due diligence.
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