Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWincopia Farms
IN THE NEWS

Wincopia Farms

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
From Interstate 95 in North Laurel, the first road you take toward Wincopia Farms rides a dividing line: suburban subdivisions on the left, farmland to the right rolling to the banks of the Middle Patuxent River. A big portion of that open land on the right, once owned by the same farming family for generations, is expected to soon raise a crop of 220 single-family homes. Beazer Homes USA bought the nearly 128-acre Wincopia property off Gorman Road last month with the intention to start building next spring and welcome the first residents that fall if its plans clear the last two hurdles for county approval.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
From Interstate 95 in North Laurel, the first road you take toward Wincopia Farms rides a dividing line: suburban subdivisions on the left, farmland to the right rolling to the banks of the Middle Patuxent River. A big portion of that open land on the right, once owned by the same farming family for generations, is expected to soon raise a crop of 220 single-family homes. Beazer Homes USA bought the nearly 128-acre Wincopia property off Gorman Road last month with the intention to start building next spring and welcome the first residents that fall if its plans clear the last two hurdles for county approval.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2010
As eviction day loomed, 79-year-old Ruth Hearn lived in an upstairs bedroom of her cold, dark home, using oil lamps for light. By her reckoning, her family had worked the 124-acre Wincopia Farms in Southeastern Howard County for six or seven generations. Before her husband's death in 1996, they grew flowers for the White House grounds; more recently, Ruth and her daughter Emily had dreamed of expanding the business with a botanical garden. But the $4.5 million loan they took out in 2002 had ballooned to a $13 million debt that they could never repay, and in 2008, lender Gourley & Gourley LLC foreclosed.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2010
As eviction day loomed, 79-year-old Ruth Hearn lived in an upstairs bedroom of her cold, dark home, using oil lamps for light. By her reckoning, her family had worked the 124-acre Wincopia Farms in Southeastern Howard County for six or seven generations. Before her husband's death in 1996, they grew flowers for the White House grounds; more recently, Ruth and her daughter Emily had dreamed of expanding the business with a botanical garden. But the $4.5 million loan they took out in 2002 had ballooned to a $13 million debt that they could never repay, and in 2008, lender Gourley & Gourley LLC foreclosed.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | April 14, 2008
For generations, Wincopia Farms in Howard County has been an almost idyllic place. The 124-acre farm of rolling hills that abuts the Middle Patuxent River was home to a greenhouse operation that supplied plants for the grounds of the White House, the Washington Monument and the Kennedy Center. And Harry C. Hearn, the patriarch of the family that owns the farm, earned admiration for sharing his love of nature with others as much as for running a thriving business, said his daughter, Emily Hearn, who recalls tagging along on deliveries.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | April 7, 1993
A former Navy lieutenant has accused his parents-in-law of luring him to Howard County with a job and then firing him after less than three months.Wade Burchell claims Harry and Ruth Hearn tricked him into moving from California to Laurel in 1991 to help run their flower business with hopes that their daughter would leave him, according to a suit filed in Howard Circuit Court last month.Five months after Mr. Burchell stopped working for the business -- Wincopia Farms Inc. -- his wife, Rebecca, left him. She later filed for divorce.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1996
With loving hands, Harry C. Hearn built Wincopia Farms' nursery operation in North Laurel into a major supplier of landscaping plants to such places as the White House, the Kennedy Center and the Washington Monument.This week, Mr. Hearn -- who died June 3 of myelodysplasia, a bone marrow disorder -- was remembered at a burial service for his love of nature and his tender heart toward people. He was 68."He loved life. He loved the things of nature," said one of his daughters, Sarah Pichardo.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 1999
LIVING IN an old town is like living in an old house -- there's always work needed to keep the joint up.Savage is no exception. Residents periodically invest sweat equity to make our town a pleasant place to live.Maintenance work, such as the cemetery cleanup last fall, is an example of that sweat equity.Now members of the Savage Community Association and the Carroll Baldwin Hall Committee have decided that it is time to do a little more. And, like all the best ideas, this one serves several purposes: to get rid of junk, bring in money and improve the appearance of Savage.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 13, 2000
THE SAVAGE Community Association transformed Baldwin Commons into an English garden, with mums and pansies arrayed around Carroll Baldwin Hall, on Sept. 30 and Oct. 1. Thanks to the support of Harry Hearn, who runs Wincopia Farms - a local wholesale nursery - the association had hundreds of plants for sale at the event. Hearn delivered the plants in the morning and helped set up the flowers. It's the third time that Hearn and the association have put on a plant sale, and it seems as though it will become a tradition.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | April 4, 2010
Plans to build 220 homes at Wincopia Farms on Gorman Road in North Laurel are moving forward, even though Ruth and Emily Hearn still live on the foreclosed property that their family owned for generations. Together with a proposal to build 143 townhouses at nearby Westover Glen along the winding, two-lane road, which has been designated "scenic" by Howard County, the projects are raising concerns among residents who fear increased traffic and school crowding. The two developments are close to the growing Emerson community in a once lightly populated area marked by large estates, farms and country roads.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.