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By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,Orlando Sentinel | August 16, 1995
To several generations, he was among the most popular men in America, commanding 60 million fans with his rat-a-tat-tat radio delivery. If Walter Winchell's name has receded with time, his impact has grown. As a newspaper and radio columnist, he shaped the country's fascination with celebrity and foreshadowed today's tabloid excesses."Biography," on cable's A&E Network, surveys his roller-coaster career in "Walter Winchell: The Voice of America" at 8 tonight.The program enlists a strong group of witnesses, including columnists Jimmy Breslin and Liz Smith; biographer John Mosedale; Jane Kean, a Winchell paramour; former press agent Ernest Lehman; and Herman Klurfeld, the assistant who ghost-wrote Winchell's column.
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NEWS
November 27, 2003
On November 25, 2003, NARROLDWINCHELL WATKINS; beloved husband of Marion Watkins; devoted father of Carolyn Jernigan, Jacqueline and Cynthia Watkins; loving brother of Sarah, Elizabeth, Audrey, James Henry, Laford, Vance, Allen and Tommy. He is also survived by one grandson and a host of other relatives and friends. On Friday, friends may call at the VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICE, 5151 Baltimore National Pike (RT. 40), from 3:00 to 8:00 P.M. On Saturday, Mr. Watkins will lie instate at New Refuge Deliverance, 1100 St. Paul St., where the family will receive friends from 11:00 to 11:30 A.M., with services to follow.
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NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | November 6, 1994
In the publicity materials for Neal Gabler's masterful biography of once-famous but now forgotten gossip guru Walter Winchell can be found these magic words: "Optioned by Martin Scorsese for a major motion picture."Winchell would be ecstatic. As much a megalomaniac as a journalistic phenomenon, Winchell always feared no one would remember him -- and in the 22 years since his death, obscurity largely has been his fate. Now Winchell once again will be the center of attention, a figure of controversy.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
With A Huevo, winner of the Frank J. De Francis Memorial Dash, Michael Dickinson affirmed his prowess with fragile, older horses. With Tapit, he showed he can train a young one, too. In only his second start, Tapit overpowered a formidable field and captured the Grade III, $100,000 Laurel Futurity by 4 3/4 lengths yesterday at Laurel Park. For Dickinson, known as a trainer of older, turf horses, the victory was his fourth stakes win of the year with a 2-year-old. Next year, when Tapit is 3, Dickinson hopes to be training a Kentucky Derby contender.
NEWS
April 29, 1997
Harry Shaub Jr., 75, former president and general manager of WGAL-TV in Lancaster, died Sunday night while golfing at a resort near Stroudsburg, Pa.Rose Bigman, 87, known for years as columnist Walter Winchell's "girl Friday," died Wednesday in New York. Miss Bigman steadfastly guarded Winchell's privacy for 35 years.Pub Date: 4/29/97
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | December 5, 1993
Six persons are displaced in a 1:30 a.m. apartment fire in Havre de Grace.A natural gas line ruptures at noon outside an Edgewood middle school, endangering nearly 1,000 students and everyone in some 50 houses in the immediate vicinity.In both cases, American Red Cross Disaster Action Team members were prepared to provide routine support and essential services that would ensure that displaced people found food, clothing and shelter.Harford County has 22 Disaster Action Team members, each trained and ready to respond.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 11, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The Army's inspector general will review the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy at Army installations around the country, officials said yesterday, after the beating death of a gay soldier and complaints that anti-gay harassment is continuing. Army Secretary Louis Caldera said he is directing Lt. Gen. Michael W. Ackerman, the inspector general, to assess how the Army is implementing the military's policy on homosexual conduct. Caldera said Ackerman will focus on the leadership at Fort Campbell, Ky., where Pfc. Barry L. Winchell, 21, was taunted by fellow soldiers and beaten to death in July.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | December 2, 1994
Chicago -- Neal Gabler, in a fascinating new book, ''Winchell: Gossip, Power and the Culture of Celebrity'' (Knopf), explains to us that if we have the Oprah-izing of America in the 1990s, it is only because we first had the Winchellizing of it in the 1930s.Walter Winchell was a minor hoofer and singer in vaudeville. He ** had started out in a boys' act with people who rose higher on the circuit than he did -- George Jessel and Eddie Cantor. But Winchell and his wife did well enough to stay alive for a few years singing and dancing.
NEWS
December 13, 1999
This is an edited excerpt of a Chicago Tribune editorial, which was published Friday.THE chilling story of 21-year-old Army private Barry Winchell illustrates, as if any additional evidence were needed, why the Pentagon's "don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays in the military is unworkable -- and why it ought to be eliminated.Mr. Winchell enlisted in 1997, filled with dreams of becoming a helicopter pilot. But because he was gay, he soon was subjected to months of harassment and was ultimately bludgeoned to death with a baseball bat by fellow private Calvin Glover.
NEWS
March 27, 1996
Deale woman killed in automobile collisionA Deale woman was killed Monday when the car in which she was riding ran a red light at Bay Front and Solomons Island roads and struck another car, county police said.Elizabeth Lenhart Merkle, 68, of the 6000 block of Melbourne Ave. was killed instantly. Her son, William Wayne Merkle, 43, of the same address, who was driving, was not injured.The driver of the other car, Donald Raymond Winchell, 48, of the 1700 black of Quantico Court in Edgewater, suffered hip and internal injuries, officials said.
NEWS
November 30, 2002
Dave "Snaker" Ray,59, an influential figure of the folk-blues scene of the 1960s who won quiet renown for his virtuoso guitar work, died Thursday in Minneapolis. He was diagnosed with lung cancer in May. Mr. Ray, longtime band partner "Spider" John Koerner and harmonica player Tony "Little Sun" Glover formed the acoustic trio Koerner, Ray & Glover in 1962, and the next year released the landmark Blues, Rags and Hollers album. Recording several albums and performing at folk festivals around the country, the trio never achieved more than cult status.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,Sun Staff | May 14, 2000
"Stork Club, America's Most Famous Nightspot and the Lost World of Cafe Society," by Ralph Blumenthal. Little, Brown & Co. 336 pages. $25. One of the great ironies of the life of Sherman Billingsley, the ex-bootlegger who ran Manhattan's Stork Club with an iron fist in a velvet glove, was his dalliance with the then-new medium of television. For a few years in the early 1950s, long after he had established the Stork Club as a glamorous celebrity mecca in the city that never sleeps, Billingsley had his own 15-minute show on CBS, a celebrity-interview program, telecast live from his posh club on Saturday nights.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 11, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The Army's inspector general will review the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy at Army installations around the country, officials said yesterday, after the beating death of a gay soldier and complaints that anti-gay harassment is continuing. Army Secretary Louis Caldera said he is directing Lt. Gen. Michael W. Ackerman, the inspector general, to assess how the Army is implementing the military's policy on homosexual conduct. Caldera said Ackerman will focus on the leadership at Fort Campbell, Ky., where Pfc. Barry L. Winchell, 21, was taunted by fellow soldiers and beaten to death in July.
NEWS
December 13, 1999
This is an edited excerpt of a Chicago Tribune editorial, which was published Friday.THE chilling story of 21-year-old Army private Barry Winchell illustrates, as if any additional evidence were needed, why the Pentagon's "don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays in the military is unworkable -- and why it ought to be eliminated.Mr. Winchell enlisted in 1997, filled with dreams of becoming a helicopter pilot. But because he was gay, he soon was subjected to months of harassment and was ultimately bludgeoned to death with a baseball bat by fellow private Calvin Glover.
NEWS
June 18, 1998
Jerrold Paul Winchell, an information systens director for New American Health, died Friday at George Washington University Hospital in Washington after suffering a heart attack while visiting the National Gallery of Art. He was 42.The lifelong Severna Park resident was employed at New American Health, a managed care help line, in Glen Burnie since 1979.He graduated from the Severn School in 1974, earned a bachelor's degree in history from George Washington University in 1979, and was attending Anne Arundel Community College.
NEWS
By Neal Gabler | November 2, 1997
Imagine Sidney Blumenthal's surprise when he sat down at his computer in August, logged on to the "Drudge Report," a popular Internet gossip column, and discovered he "has a spousal-abuse past that has been effectively covered up."As Blumenthal, political journalist and newly appointed presidential assistant, told it through his attorney, this was news to him and to his wife, who directs the White House fellows program. They responded by slapping a $30 million libel suit on Matt Drudge, who writes the "Drudge Report," and on America Online, the Internet service that carries it. Meanwhile, Drudge, saying he had been snookered by his source, pulled the item and issued a retraction.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Sun Staff Writer | July 26, 1994
Debbie Miller suspected there was something seriously wrong with the 47-year-old caller when the woman started asking about EKGs."She wanted to know if an EKG would detect potential heart attacks," said Ms. Miller, a registered nurse working North Arundel Hospital's new Healthline, a resource and information line staffed by trained nurses 24 hours a day, seven days a week.After asking the woman additional questions, Ms. Miller became convinced she needed emergency medical attention."She had a crushing pain in the chest," said Ms. Miller.
NEWS
By Neal Gabler | November 2, 1997
Imagine Sidney Blumenthal's surprise when he sat down at his computer in August, logged on to the "Drudge Report," a popular Internet gossip column, and discovered he "has a spousal-abuse past that has been effectively covered up."As Blumenthal, political journalist and newly appointed presidential assistant, told it through his attorney, this was news to him and to his wife, who directs the White House fellows program. They responded by slapping a $30 million libel suit on Matt Drudge, who writes the "Drudge Report," and on America Online, the Internet service that carries it. Meanwhile, Drudge, saying he had been snookered by his source, pulled the item and issued a retraction.
NEWS
April 29, 1997
Harry Shaub Jr., 75, former president and general manager of WGAL-TV in Lancaster, died Sunday night while golfing at a resort near Stroudsburg, Pa.Rose Bigman, 87, known for years as columnist Walter Winchell's "girl Friday," died Wednesday in New York. Miss Bigman steadfastly guarded Winchell's privacy for 35 years.Pub Date: 4/29/97
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1996
James Albert Colimore Sr., a highly decorated World War II glider pilot and entertainment columnist who chronicled Baltimore's night life for more than 25 years, died Sunday of leukemia at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 86.Mr. Colimore began his newspaper career delivering papers for the News-Post and Sunday American in the late 1920s and later joined the newspaper's advertising department. He retired in 1979.His column "Table Talk," which evolved into "After Dark," recorded the foibles and vagaries of the city's nightclub owners, restaurateurs and entertainers who performed in such legendary late-night watering holes as the Chanticleer at Charles at Eager streets.
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