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Win The Preakness

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SPORTS
May 20, 2000
Editor's note: Last year, Sun publisher Mike Waller, an avid racing fan, picked Charismatic to win the Preakness at the generous price of $18.80 for each $2 bet. Here's how he sizes up this year's race. Only if he falls coming out of the gate will Fusaichi Pegasus lose the 125th Preakness. So don't waste any money trying to beat him. He's the best 3-year-old since Seattle Slew. You'll only win small coins betting Fu-Peg to win, since his odds are likely to be about 3-5. Therefore, a better bet is picking the exacta (the first- and second-place horses in the exact order)
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SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | May 20, 2013
This was for every guy who ever had a mid-life crisis and tried to do something nobody thought could be done. Fifty-year-old Jockey Gary Stevens took Oxbow to the front early and never looked back on the way to an upset victory in the 138th Preakness Stakes that was truly one for the ageless. Oxbow was a 15-1 shot when he left the gate, and he wasn't the one beating the longest odds at Old Hilltop on Saturday. Stevens became the first grandfather ever to win a Triple Crown race, and he did it against a Kentucky Derby winner - Orb - that was considered almost unassailable.
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SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | May 19, 1995
If the Correction Factor has merit, there is no use putting any of your money on Thunder Gulch tomorrow in the Preakness.If the Correction Factor has merit, Timber Country will cross the finish line first.That, again, is if the Correction Factor has merit.Which it does, sort of.If you haven't heard of the Correction Factor, don't worry. I just made it up.Actually, I just gave it a name. It is a Triple Crown handicapping theory that has become increasingly popular in the '90s.With merit, sort of.The theory, basically, is that the best horse in the Kentucky Derby wins the Preakness.
NEWS
May 18, 2012
Bodemeister will hang on Joseph Schwerdt Sun Sentinel Had the Kentucky Derby (at 1 1/4 miles) been the same length as the Preakness Stakes (1 3/16 miles), we might be talking about Bodemeister winning the Run for the Roses. But that last sixteenth of a mile was just enough for I'll Have Another to win at Churchill Downs. This time around Bodemeister will hold off the challenge to take the Preakness and we'll have to wait yet another year for a Triple Crown winner.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | May 13, 1993
Mack Miller is confident he'll win the Belmont Stakes with Kentucky Derby winner Sea Hero.But he's not so sure about the Preakness."It is going to take an awful lot of luck to win this one," Miller said. "With this horse's enormous stride and the large sweeping turns [at the New York track], it's the Belmont that is our cup of tea."The 71-year-old trainer, and his wife, Martha, arrived at Pimlico Race Course for the first time yesterday afternoon and immediately checked in on Sea Hero.Miller added that he is "cautiously optimistic" about the horse's chances Saturday, mainly because Sea Hero has recovered so well from his winning race in the Kentucky Derby.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1999
Although Lemon Drop Kid won't run in the Preakness, look for him in the Belmont.Trainer Scotty Schulhofer and Maryland owners Jinny Vance and Laddie Dance say they haven't lost confidence in the colt. They just want to preserve him for races later this season."It's a long year," Schulhofer said from his barn at Belmont Park. "And he's a young horse."A May 26 foal, Lemon Drop Kid had a rough trip in the Blue Grass Stakes, finishing fifth, and an even rougher trip in the Kentucky Derby, finishing ninth.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser | May 18, 2002
Tom Keyser's comments USS Tinosa He was a highly regarded Kentucky Derby contender until finishing fifth in the Santa Anita Derby. He encountered much trouble in that race, and then he was excluded from the Derby because of insufficient earnings. He's ready now, and he could light up the board with a late charge against tiring front-runners. Magic Weisner What else can be said about this Cinderella horse? Longtime local horsewoman Nancy Alberts bought his crooked-leg dam for $1, nurtured her, raced her and then bred her to local sire Ameri Valay.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2004
The focus shifts from horse to horse before the Kentucky Derby. Before the Preakness, it locks onto one. The Derby winner arrives at Pimlico Race Course a celebrity. His task is clear: Win the Preakness, the second leg of the Triple Crown, so he can move ahead to Belmont Park with a chance for immortality. Five times in the past seven years, the Derby winner has stormed into Baltimore and snared the Preakness, only to lose the Belmont three weeks later. And racing is deprived of another Triple Crown winner.
NEWS
By James M. Merritt | May 17, 1991
IN ALL MY YEARS of attending the races, the best handicapper I ever knew was Capt. Frank Case, a former ship master, who had come ashore to open a nautical instrument shop on South Gay Street, then Baltimore's principal maritime thoroughfare.The captain always maintained that, next to the Chesapeake blue crab, the Preakness was the best thing Baltimore had going for it. In his opinion it was the greatest horse race in the country, one for which the Kentucky Derby was merely a proving ground for 3-year-olds to establish their right to compete in the Preakness.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee | May 16, 1991
Nick Zito knelt before the queen, nodding and smiling, doing his best to show deference. Photographers clicked madly; cameramen zoomed in.Everybody laughed. It wasn't really Queen Elizabeth II, merely a cardboard replica. Pimlico Race Course officials thought it would be a great gag for the current king of horse racing to meet the queen while she was in town -- even if it was only make-believe.Zito has relished the role of racetrack "royalty," one traditionally bestowed on the trainer of the Kentucky Derby winner.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
Deputed Testamony is 32-years-old. His dark brown coat is shaggy, and his biggest excitement is going into his paddock at Bonita Farm for three or four hours of grazing each day. He is a pensioner, an icon. The oldest living winner of a Triple Crown race. But when Billy Boniface looks at the horse in his paddock, he sees the striking colt that was born and trained at the family farm and raced to victory in the 1983 Preakness - the last horse bred or trained in Maryland to do so. "Oh my gosh, I still get goose bumps when I look at him and remember that day," said Boniface, who was 18 then and had just taken over the breeding operation at the farm.
SPORTS
May 20, 2011
Animal, plan it Neil Milbert Chicago Tribune Granted, Animal Kingdom outran a relatively weak field when he made his dirt racing debut and won the Kentucky Derby as a 20-1 long shot. Going into the Derby with six weeks of rest, he proved to be the best and raced the final quarter in a razor-sharp 24.55 seconds. All of that suggests the well-bred colt is capable of a comparable performance at Pimlico — where he will be facing an even weaker field than the one he dominated at Churchill Downs.
SPORTS
By KEVIN COWHERD | May 18, 2009
Rachel Alexandra, America needs you in a big way. When's the last time the country got this excited about a female? I'll tell you when: Susan Boyle. Boyle, of course, was the Scottish spinster with the frumpy clothes and bird's-nest hair who wowed everyone last month with her million-dollar voice on the TV show Britain's Got Talent. Millions of us watched that stirring Internet clip of her singing "I Dreamed a Dream" from Les Miserables. She captured our imagination, this Plain Jane whose talent and grit overcame her physical limitations.
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE and SANDRA MCKEE,SUN REPORTER | May 18, 2006
Joe De Francis, the Maryland Jockey Club's chief executive officer, was all smiles at the Preakness Stakes draw yesterday, not at all put off by suggestions made during the ESPN broadcast that poor sportsmanship was being shown by the majority of trainers who chose not to bring their Kentucky Derby horses to the Preakness. "I think the problem was that Barbaro was so dominant trainers didn't want to face him again," De Francis said. "It's always a mixed blessing - or a double-edged sword - for a horse to win the Derby as easily as he did. The positive is that it generates excitement and enthusiasm for the Triple Crown among a lot of average spectators and the negative is it's very much tougher to convince the 19 trainers behind him to take him on in the Preakness.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2005
Malibu Moonshine may have run his way into the Preakness yesterday. Aided by a slow pace and a compact field, the chestnut colt proved he could handle 1 1/8 miles, overtaking front-runner Hello Jerry in deep stretch to capture the $150,000 Federico Tesio Stakes, the feature on the Spring Festival of Racing at Pimlico Race Course, by three-quarters of a length. The performance could be a steppingstone into the middle jewel of the Triple Crown, although trainer King Leatherbury is not committing just yet. "We'll evaluate this effort and then decide later," said Leatherbury, 72 years old and third on the all-time list with 6,070 wins.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2004
The focus shifts from horse to horse before the Kentucky Derby. Before the Preakness, it locks onto one. The Derby winner arrives at Pimlico Race Course a celebrity. His task is clear: Win the Preakness, the second leg of the Triple Crown, so he can move ahead to Belmont Park with a chance for immortality. Five times in the past seven years, the Derby winner has stormed into Baltimore and snared the Preakness, only to lose the Belmont three weeks later. And racing is deprived of another Triple Crown winner.
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE and SANDRA MCKEE,SUN REPORTER | May 18, 2006
Joe De Francis, the Maryland Jockey Club's chief executive officer, was all smiles at the Preakness Stakes draw yesterday, not at all put off by suggestions made during the ESPN broadcast that poor sportsmanship was being shown by the majority of trainers who chose not to bring their Kentucky Derby horses to the Preakness. "I think the problem was that Barbaro was so dominant trainers didn't want to face him again," De Francis said. "It's always a mixed blessing - or a double-edged sword - for a horse to win the Derby as easily as he did. The positive is that it generates excitement and enthusiasm for the Triple Crown among a lot of average spectators and the negative is it's very much tougher to convince the 19 trainers behind him to take him on in the Preakness.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1999
A Preakness without Bob Baffert?That seems almost unthinkable after Baffert trainees Silver Charm and Real Quiet captured the last two runnings of the Triple Crown's middle jewel. But it's a real possibility in the aftermath of the disappointing, 4-5-11 finishes of his three Kentucky Derby entries.General Challenge (11th) was shipped home to California. Excellent Meeting (fifth) will stay in Kentucky. Prime Timber is at Churchill Downs, but still on the fence. And the outstanding filly, Silverbulletday, will come here with a rider, but isn't certain to run.Baffert will wait until workouts Monday in Kentucky before deciding the agenda of Prime Timber, who raced wide with a host of others in the Derby before rallying for fourth money.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser | May 18, 2002
Tom Keyser's comments USS Tinosa He was a highly regarded Kentucky Derby contender until finishing fifth in the Santa Anita Derby. He encountered much trouble in that race, and then he was excluded from the Derby because of insufficient earnings. He's ready now, and he could light up the board with a late charge against tiring front-runners. Magic Weisner What else can be said about this Cinderella horse? Longtime local horsewoman Nancy Alberts bought his crooked-leg dam for $1, nurtured her, raced her and then bred her to local sire Ameri Valay.
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