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Wim Wenders

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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 21, 2006
Twenty-two years ago, German director Wim Wenders and American playwright Sam Shepard collaborated on the film Paris, Texas, a muted, contemplative meditation on loss, identity and familial responsibility set in the picturesquely lonely expanses of the American Southwest. The film won the Cannes Palme d'Or, gave Harry Dean Stanton and Nastassja Kinski the roles of their careers and would emerge as one of the best, most-resonant films of the 1980s. The film was suffused with both men's love of the American West, their fascination with its vastness and its iconography.
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NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 21, 2006
Twenty-two years ago, German director Wim Wenders and American playwright Sam Shepard collaborated on the film Paris, Texas, a muted, contemplative meditation on loss, identity and familial responsibility set in the picturesquely lonely expanses of the American Southwest. The film won the Cannes Palme d'Or, gave Harry Dean Stanton and Nastassja Kinski the roles of their careers and would emerge as one of the best, most-resonant films of the 1980s. The film was suffused with both men's love of the American West, their fascination with its vastness and its iconography.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 14, 2000
There was a time when U2 was virtually synonymous with rock heroism. From the pell-mell pulse of "I Will Follow" to the martial drumbeats of "Sunday Bloody Sunday," the band epitomized the fist-pumping, flag-waving energy of '80s rock. Even in the '90s, when U2's sound turned funky and electronic, its energy level remained high, adding an exhilarating edge to the likes of the hypnotic "Even Better Than the Real Thing" and the thumping "Discotheque." Unfortunately, there's no sign of that U2 on "The Million Dollar Hotel" (Interscope 314 542 395, arriving in stores today)
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 19, 2006
Don't Come Knocking presents its audience with an intriguingly dysfunctional family, and a handful of absurdist laughs. But it rarely strikes the right tone and ultimately falls short of what one would expect from a collaboration between director Wim Wenders and writer Sam Shepard. The film begins as yet another look at the shallowness of Hollywood and the relentlessly formulaic product it dumps on an undemanding public (a theme that ought to be retired immediately, lest it become a cliche itself)
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 17, 2006
My generation - born right after [World War II] - was born into a total no-man's land. We ... didn't want anything more than for this nationality and identity to disappear. My generation is among the most fervent Europeans, for we realized if ever we could acquire a new identity, it was going to be European." - WIM WENDERS, German-born film director
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 19, 2006
Don't Come Knocking presents its audience with an intriguingly dysfunctional family, and a handful of absurdist laughs. But it rarely strikes the right tone and ultimately falls short of what one would expect from a collaboration between director Wim Wenders and writer Sam Shepard. The film begins as yet another look at the shallowness of Hollywood and the relentlessly formulaic product it dumps on an undemanding public (a theme that ought to be retired immediately, lest it become a cliche itself)
FEATURES
By Desmond Ryan and Desmond Ryan,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 17, 1997
In "The End of Violence," German director Wim Wenders ("Paris, Texas") has crafted a provocative work that is at its best in considering those who reap immense profits by purveying images of violence.The movie has its faults -- most notably in bending its plot and the behavior of its characters to support an appeal for radical changes in attitude -- but it is better than its release history suggested. It drew withering scorn at last spring's Cannes Film Festival, and Wenders drastically re-edited it.Bill Pullman plays an enormously successful Hollywood producer known for ultra-violent thrillers who ignores his bored wife (Andie MacDowell)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 18, 1992
I kept waiting for the sad clown of life, from the Bud Lite commercials, to appear in "Until the End of the World," which has just opened at the Rotunda. But alas, he doesn't. Why ask why?Unfortunately, his opposite number, the sad clown of lifelessness, was everywhere in evidence. This nasty scalawag spreads his anti-magic dust on all the proceedings, turning the actors into faintly embarrassed mannequins and the story into a fragile construct of tissue-thin coincidence and foolishness. The sad clown of lifelessness, moreover, transmutes the light touch of German director Wim Wenders ("Paris, Texas")
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 30, 1999
"Buena Vista Social Club" is a movie so full of heroes that it's difficult to know whom to single out. Its subjects -- a group of elderly Cuban musicians who re-unite in an expression of passion, commitment and solidarity -- are heroes, if only for surviving years of neglect and cultural amnesia.Ry Cooder, one of America's most eclectic popular musicians, is a hero for seeking out these important and forgotten folk musicians and not only recording them but also assembling them for two legendary live performances.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 18, 1992
I kept waiting for the sad clown of life, from the Bud Lite commercials, to appear in "Until the End of the World," which has just opened at the Rotunda. But alas, he doesn't. Why ask why?Unfortunately, his opposite number, the sad clown of lifelessness, was everywhere in evidence. This nasty scalawag spreads his anti-magic dust on all the proceedings, turning the actors into faintly embarrassed mannequins and the story into a fragile construct of tissue-thin coincidence and foolishness. The sad clown of lifelessness, moreover, transmutes the light touch of German director Wim Wenders ("Paris, Texas")
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 17, 2006
My generation - born right after [World War II] - was born into a total no-man's land. We ... didn't want anything more than for this nationality and identity to disappear. My generation is among the most fervent Europeans, for we realized if ever we could acquire a new identity, it was going to be European." - WIM WENDERS, German-born film director
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 14, 2000
There was a time when U2 was virtually synonymous with rock heroism. From the pell-mell pulse of "I Will Follow" to the martial drumbeats of "Sunday Bloody Sunday," the band epitomized the fist-pumping, flag-waving energy of '80s rock. Even in the '90s, when U2's sound turned funky and electronic, its energy level remained high, adding an exhilarating edge to the likes of the hypnotic "Even Better Than the Real Thing" and the thumping "Discotheque." Unfortunately, there's no sign of that U2 on "The Million Dollar Hotel" (Interscope 314 542 395, arriving in stores today)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 30, 1999
"Buena Vista Social Club" is a movie so full of heroes that it's difficult to know whom to single out. Its subjects -- a group of elderly Cuban musicians who re-unite in an expression of passion, commitment and solidarity -- are heroes, if only for surviving years of neglect and cultural amnesia.Ry Cooder, one of America's most eclectic popular musicians, is a hero for seeking out these important and forgotten folk musicians and not only recording them but also assembling them for two legendary live performances.
FEATURES
By Desmond Ryan and Desmond Ryan,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 17, 1997
In "The End of Violence," German director Wim Wenders ("Paris, Texas") has crafted a provocative work that is at its best in considering those who reap immense profits by purveying images of violence.The movie has its faults -- most notably in bending its plot and the behavior of its characters to support an appeal for radical changes in attitude -- but it is better than its release history suggested. It drew withering scorn at last spring's Cannes Film Festival, and Wenders drastically re-edited it.Bill Pullman plays an enormously successful Hollywood producer known for ultra-violent thrillers who ignores his bored wife (Andie MacDowell)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 11, 1994
"Faraway, So Close"Starring Otto Sander and Nastassja KinskiDirected by Wim WendersReleased by Sony ClassicsPG-13 rated***5/8 The most famous fallen angel of them all, Lucifer, lost his position in heaven out of the most human of sins, pride.Surely it is the central irony of Wim Wenders' dazzling "Faraway, So Close" that his angel, Cassiel, loses his place for the most angelic of virtues: compassion.Cassiel, played by Otto Sander, has a face that radiates that value like a defective radiator issuing vapors.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 18, 1992
I kept waiting for the sad clown of life, from the Bud Lite commercials, to appear in "Until the End of the World," which has just opened at the Rotunda. But alas, he doesn't. Why ask why?Unfortunately, his opposite number, the sad clown of lifelessness, was everywhere in evidence. This nasty scalawag spreads his anti-magic dust on all the proceedings, turning the actors into faintly embarrassed mannequins and the story into a fragile construct of tissue-thin coincidence and foolishness. The sad clown of lifelessness, moreover, transmutes the light touch of German director Wim Wenders ("Paris, Texas")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 11, 1994
"Faraway, So Close"Starring Otto Sander and Nastassja KinskiDirected by Wim WendersReleased by Sony ClassicsPG-13 rated***5/8 The most famous fallen angel of them all, Lucifer, lost his position in heaven out of the most human of sins, pride.Surely it is the central irony of Wim Wenders' dazzling "Faraway, So Close" that his angel, Cassiel, loses his place for the most angelic of virtues: compassion.Cassiel, played by Otto Sander, has a face that radiates that value like a defective radiator issuing vapors.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts | October 4, 2004
Walking tours, lectures and a costume ball are among the highlights of the first-ever Baltimore Architecture Week, a seven-day celebration from Saturday through Oct. 16, organized by the Baltimore chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Events include: "The Legacy of Modern Architecture in Maryland," a talk by Richard Longstreth, a George Washington University professor, at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 12 at Temple Oheb Shalom, 7310 Park Heights Ave. "Design Matters," a panel discussion about the state of architecture and urban design in Baltimore, at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 13 at the Johns Hopkins University Downtown Center, 10 N. Charles St. Wings of Desire, a film by Wim Wenders, at 9 p.m., Oct. 14 at the Charles Theatre, 1711 N. Charles St. "2004 Excellence in Design Awards Program and Beaux Art Ball," 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Oct. 16, at the Clipper Mill Foundry, 3502 Clipper Mill Road.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 18, 1992
I kept waiting for the sad clown of life, from the Bud Lite commercials, to appear in "Until the End of the World," which has just opened at the Rotunda. But alas, he doesn't. Why ask why?Unfortunately, his opposite number, the sad clown of lifelessness, was everywhere in evidence. This nasty scalawag spreads his anti-magic dust on all the proceedings, turning the actors into faintly embarrassed mannequins and the story into a fragile construct of tissue-thin coincidence and foolishness. The sad clown of lifelessness, moreover, transmutes the light touch of German director Wim Wenders ("Paris, Texas")
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