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BUSINESS
By Charles Belfoure and Charles Belfoure,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 2001
"Homeownership is the key to a successful neighborhood," said Charles McDaniel. And that's exactly what was believed by Harry O'Neill Wilson, who 84 years ago founded McDaniel's community, Wilson Park. For blacks in early 20th-century Baltimore, housing opportunities were limited, and homeownership was an impossibility for most. In 1917, Wilson created a development specifically to give black families the chance to own their homes or to have access to decent rental housing. It was the first community in Baltimore to be developed solely for blacks.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | July 31, 2013
Live music and the smell of Cuban beef stew filled the air in a hard-to-find Baltimore City park known as The Field, as several hundred people turned out July 26 for WAVEscape, Waverly's early version of National Night Out on Aug. 6. "Look at these neighbors," said Debra Evans, who helped organize the first-time festival. "They brought their lawn chairs and put them out in the middle of The Field. To me, that says community. " More visions of community are expected Aug. 6 as Charles Village and several other communities prepare for their own versions of the annual National Night Out - "America's Night Out Against Crime," according to http://www.natw.org the website of the organization National Association of Town Watch, which organizes National Night Out, now in its 30th year..
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NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | January 25, 1994
IN June 1936, The Evening Sun published a "Who's Who Among Negroes in Baltimore." One of the prominent names in the section was Harry O'Neill Wilson Sr., who was said to employ 78 people. "The only Negro banker in Maryland," the paper said, "he is regarded as a very wealthy man."Wilson had to scramble to make it in Baltimore. Born in 1873, the son of the first black principal in the city school system, he worked as a shoemaker until 1903, when he founded the Mutual Benefit Society, an insurance company with an office at Fayette and Pearl streets.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2013
The cinder block dugouts are decrepit and the backstop is ragged at the old baseball diamond in Galesville, but giants once ran the bases in this southern Anne Arundel County town. Not just giants but Elite Giants, as in the old Negro Leagues team of the 1930s and 1940s. They and other legendary clubs from era of segregated baseball — such as the Homestead Grays and Newark Eagles — were annual visitors to play exhibitions at the home of the Galesville Hot Sox. Scores of local residents turned out Sunday to remember those days and celebrate the preservation of a vibrant part of Anne Arundel's African-American history at a first-pitch ceremony marking the county's acquisition of the Hot Sox Field at Wilson Park.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2013
The cinder block dugouts are decrepit and the backstop is ragged at the old baseball diamond in Galesville, but giants once ran the bases in this southern Anne Arundel County town. Not just giants but Elite Giants, as in the old Negro Leagues team of the 1930s and 1940s. They and other legendary clubs from era of segregated baseball — such as the Homestead Grays and Newark Eagles — were annual visitors to play exhibitions at the home of the Galesville Hot Sox. Scores of local residents turned out Sunday to remember those days and celebrate the preservation of a vibrant part of Anne Arundel's African-American history at a first-pitch ceremony marking the county's acquisition of the Hot Sox Field at Wilson Park.
BUSINESS
By Martin Schneider and Martin Schneider,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 9, 2000
When Mabel Smith first saw the ramshackle house at 4423 Craddock Ave., it didn't look anything like a property that was once a center of black society in Baltimore. The windows on the home were boarded up. Holes stretched from floor to ceiling. And the back yard was filled with all manner of neighborhood junk -- from washing machines to trash bags. But beneath the years of wear, something attracted her to the vacant house, and when it came up for auction in 1992, Mrs. Smith and her husband, Walton, landed the property for $12,000 and spent the next five years renovating it before calling it home.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
The abandoned rowhouse next door to Wendy and Brian Malaney has been a nightmare of a neighbor. The rowhouse's roofing material blew off, and water seeped through the Malaneys' adjoining walls. Later the pipes burst in the neighboring property, flooding their basement. The air they and their two young daughters breathe is now heavy with the noxious stink of mold. Abandoned buildings are a perennial problem in Baltimore — a city where many residents share connecting walls. Nearly one-third of the city's 16,000 uninhabitable properties are near occupied homes, city officials say. And a key part of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's new plan to attack vacancies is ratcheting up code enforcement on blocks where many residents still live, issuing fines more quickly.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1998
Baltimore officials have agreed to pay $384,000 for the repair of shoddy workmanship in a dozen Govans houses built three years ago with city subsidies.Owners of the houses are expected to accept the offer of Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III to give each of them a check for $32,000 to hire a contractor to correct a long list of defects."They're tired," said Linda McWayne, who led the effort to have the problems repaired, of her fellow owners. "They're going to go for it" despite misgivings that the money won't be sufficient to cover repair costs.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | July 31, 2013
Live music and the smell of Cuban beef stew filled the air in a hard-to-find Baltimore City park known as The Field, as several hundred people turned out July 26 for WAVEscape, Waverly's early version of National Night Out on Aug. 6. "Look at these neighbors," said Debra Evans, who helped organize the first-time festival. "They brought their lawn chairs and put them out in the middle of The Field. To me, that says community. " More visions of community are expected Aug. 6 as Charles Village and several other communities prepare for their own versions of the annual National Night Out - "America's Night Out Against Crime," according to http://www.natw.org the website of the organization National Association of Town Watch, which organizes National Night Out, now in its 30th year..
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2010
Kenneth A. Savage has been preaching for nearly a decade inside a double-wide rowhouse on East Lombard Street in Highlandtown. The pastor of Holy Truth Temple of Deliverance House of Praise says he's reached out to the corner boys who set up their drug shop on nearby narrow Mount Pleasant Avenue and welcomed the homeless to help them find housing. Kevin L. Bernhard has been working for years to improve his neighborhood, too. The president of the Highlandtown Community Association has canvassed door-to-door with police to inform residents about crime problems and helped to clean up litter.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2010
Kenneth A. Savage has been preaching for nearly a decade inside a double-wide rowhouse on East Lombard Street in Highlandtown. The pastor of Holy Truth Temple of Deliverance House of Praise says he's reached out to the corner boys who set up their drug shop on nearby narrow Mount Pleasant Avenue and welcomed the homeless to help them find housing. Kevin L. Bernhard has been working for years to improve his neighborhood, too. The president of the Highlandtown Community Association has canvassed door-to-door with police to inform residents about crime problems and helped to clean up litter.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
The abandoned rowhouse next door to Wendy and Brian Malaney has been a nightmare of a neighbor. The rowhouse's roofing material blew off, and water seeped through the Malaneys' adjoining walls. Later the pipes burst in the neighboring property, flooding their basement. The air they and their two young daughters breathe is now heavy with the noxious stink of mold. Abandoned buildings are a perennial problem in Baltimore — a city where many residents share connecting walls. Nearly one-third of the city's 16,000 uninhabitable properties are near occupied homes, city officials say. And a key part of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's new plan to attack vacancies is ratcheting up code enforcement on blocks where many residents still live, issuing fines more quickly.
BUSINESS
By Charles Belfoure and Charles Belfoure,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 2001
"Homeownership is the key to a successful neighborhood," said Charles McDaniel. And that's exactly what was believed by Harry O'Neill Wilson, who 84 years ago founded McDaniel's community, Wilson Park. For blacks in early 20th-century Baltimore, housing opportunities were limited, and homeownership was an impossibility for most. In 1917, Wilson created a development specifically to give black families the chance to own their homes or to have access to decent rental housing. It was the first community in Baltimore to be developed solely for blacks.
BUSINESS
By Martin Schneider and Martin Schneider,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 9, 2000
When Mabel Smith first saw the ramshackle house at 4423 Craddock Ave., it didn't look anything like a property that was once a center of black society in Baltimore. The windows on the home were boarded up. Holes stretched from floor to ceiling. And the back yard was filled with all manner of neighborhood junk -- from washing machines to trash bags. But beneath the years of wear, something attracted her to the vacant house, and when it came up for auction in 1992, Mrs. Smith and her husband, Walton, landed the property for $12,000 and spent the next five years renovating it before calling it home.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1998
Baltimore officials have agreed to pay $384,000 for the repair of shoddy workmanship in a dozen Govans houses built three years ago with city subsidies.Owners of the houses are expected to accept the offer of Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III to give each of them a check for $32,000 to hire a contractor to correct a long list of defects."They're tired," said Linda McWayne, who led the effort to have the problems repaired, of her fellow owners. "They're going to go for it" despite misgivings that the money won't be sufficient to cover repair costs.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | January 25, 1994
IN June 1936, The Evening Sun published a "Who's Who Among Negroes in Baltimore." One of the prominent names in the section was Harry O'Neill Wilson Sr., who was said to employ 78 people. "The only Negro banker in Maryland," the paper said, "he is regarded as a very wealthy man."Wilson had to scramble to make it in Baltimore. Born in 1873, the son of the first black principal in the city school system, he worked as a shoemaker until 1903, when he founded the Mutual Benefit Society, an insurance company with an office at Fayette and Pearl streets.
NEWS
June 8, 2006
TIMOTHY RICHARD BLAKE son of the late Lawrence and Dorothy Blake. Memorial Services Friday, June 9, 7:00 P.M. Wilson Park Christian Community Church, 4629-31 York Road
NEWS
May 28, 2008
On May 23, 2008, CHARLIE J. CARTER. Family will receive friends on Friday at Wilson Park C.C. Church, 4629-31 York Road at 10 A.M., with funeral service to follow at 10:30 A.M. Interment Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery. www.williamcbrownfh.com
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