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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
A group of young men at Howard Community College are giving new meaning to the Orwellian phrase, "Big Brother is watching you. " They are members of the community college's leadership program Howard PRIDE (Purpose, Respect, Initiative, Determination, Excellence), and their designated Big Brother is Steven Freeman, the program's assistant director. To say they relish his watchful eye is an understatement. What began as a pilot program three years ago offering math support to boost graduation rates among African-American males has become a resource and mentoring tool for any Howard Community College male of color.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
A group of young men at Howard Community College are giving new meaning to the Orwellian phrase, "Big Brother is watching you. " They are members of the community college's leadership program Howard PRIDE (Purpose, Respect, Initiative, Determination, Excellence), and their designated Big Brother is Steven Freeman, the program's assistant director. To say they relish his watchful eye is an understatement. What began as a pilot program three years ago offering math support to boost graduation rates among African-American males has become a resource and mentoring tool for any Howard Community College male of color.
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NEWS
By Patricia J. Mitchell | August 5, 2013
With the recent announcements that Wilson College in Pennsylvania and Pine Manor College in Massachusetts will join the lengthening list of formerly women-only institutions that are now co-educational - including Hood College and Goucher College here in Maryland - what hope is there for the single-sex colleges that remain? In a word: plenty. Graduates of women's colleges are twice as likely as female graduates of co-ed institutions to earn a Ph.D., attend medical school, be involved in philanthropic activity, attain higher positions in their careers and earn higher incomes.
NEWS
By Patricia J. Mitchell | August 5, 2013
With the recent announcements that Wilson College in Pennsylvania and Pine Manor College in Massachusetts will join the lengthening list of formerly women-only institutions that are now co-educational - including Hood College and Goucher College here in Maryland - what hope is there for the single-sex colleges that remain? In a word: plenty. Graduates of women's colleges are twice as likely as female graduates of co-ed institutions to earn a Ph.D., attend medical school, be involved in philanthropic activity, attain higher positions in their careers and earn higher incomes.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1998
The Coppin State women's volleyball team has lost 112 straight matches over the past five years.The new coach, who is only 22, met her team barely a month ago as several of the players were first picking up the game. A few hours before the season's opening match, their full uniforms still hadn't arrived. Finally suited up, the 10 players rapidly lost No. 107 to Norfolk State.The team can't even win for losing. Nationally, Coppin's streak ranks second behind Chicago State (Ill.), which hasn't won in 131 straight tries.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2003
Heather Launse is one of those special college athletes. Her only goal as a member of the University of Pittsburgh gymnastics team has been for the Panthers to succeed amid an atmosphere of team unity and close friendships. Launse (Severna Park) has never lost sight of that goal throughout her sometimes trying four years at Pittsburgh, and she is beginning to reap the benefits as her career heads into the final weeks. Two weeks ago, Launse tied a school record on the vault (9.85) in a narrow loss to Ohio State, 196.050 to 195.225.
NEWS
June 28, 2003
NANCY LEE WILBUR NEEDLES, 73, of Cape May passed away peacefully of natural causes in her home Wednesday evening. She was born in Baltimore and moved to Cape May as a full-time resident in 1975. Mrs. Needles is survived by her beloved husband of 51 years Henry C. Needles; her three children, Lorrie Needles of Millington, MD, Craig Needles of Cape May, and Kathryn Kint of Cape May. She is also survived by three grandchildren Anna, Nathan, and Andrew Kint. A memorial service will be announced at a later date.
NEWS
February 20, 2005
Louise R. Birch, a retired Baltimore County public school principal, died of pneumonia Feb. 12 at St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 87. Born Louise Robey in Washington, D.C., she earned a bachelor of science degree from Wilson College and a master's degree from the University of Maryland, College Park. After teaching in District of Columbia schools and living briefly in Teaneck, N.J., Mrs. Birch moved to Baltimore and in 1952 began teaching at Stoneleigh Elementary School, in the community where she lived.
NEWS
October 1, 1990
Alice E. White, a resident of Salisbury since 1902, died of heart failure Saturday at the Salisbury Nursing Home, where she had been living since June. She was 91.Services for Mrs. White will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at the Holloway funeral establishment there.The former Alice Elliott was born in Whitehaven in Wicomico County and was a graduate of Wicomico High School and Wilson College. She married Edward R. White Jr., a former mayor of Salisbury, in 1924. The couple lived in a house on Park Avenue that was built by Mrs. White's father and is now part of the city's historic district.
NEWS
October 1, 1990
Services for Alice E. White, a resident of Salisbury since 1902, will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at the Holloway Funeral Home there.Mrs. White died of heart failure Saturday at the Salisbury Nursing Home, where she had been living since June. She was 91.The former Alice Elliott was born in Whitehaven and was a graduate of Wicomico High School and Wilson College. She married Edward R. White Jr., a former mayor of Salisbury, in The couple lived in a house on Park Avenue that was built by Mrs. White's father and is now part of the city's historic district.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2003
Heather Launse is one of those special college athletes. Her only goal as a member of the University of Pittsburgh gymnastics team has been for the Panthers to succeed amid an atmosphere of team unity and close friendships. Launse (Severna Park) has never lost sight of that goal throughout her sometimes trying four years at Pittsburgh, and she is beginning to reap the benefits as her career heads into the final weeks. Two weeks ago, Launse tied a school record on the vault (9.85) in a narrow loss to Ohio State, 196.050 to 195.225.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1998
The Coppin State women's volleyball team has lost 112 straight matches over the past five years.The new coach, who is only 22, met her team barely a month ago as several of the players were first picking up the game. A few hours before the season's opening match, their full uniforms still hadn't arrived. Finally suited up, the 10 players rapidly lost No. 107 to Norfolk State.The team can't even win for losing. Nationally, Coppin's streak ranks second behind Chicago State (Ill.), which hasn't won in 131 straight tries.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1998
As Coppin State women's volleyball coach Stephanie Ready recalled, her team saw last night's regular-season finale against Maryland-Eastern Shore as a case of now or never.The Eagles, mired in a 129-match losing streak, chose now and beat UMES in a seemingly interminable, two-hour contest, 15-8, 8-15, 8-15, 16-14, 23-21, at the Coppin Center, the cheering section of 207 spilling onto the court immediately afterward."It took long enough, but we got it," Ready said after the team's first win since Oct. 19, 1993, against Wilson College.
NEWS
December 1, 1995
Jurgen Wattenberg, 94, a German U-boat commander who led an escape from a prisoner-of-war camp in Phoenix, Ariz., during World War II, died Monday in Hamburg, Germany. In 1944, he led 25 German POWs through a tunnel at the Papago Park camp in what was described as the greatest escape from an American POW compound by German prisoners during World War II.All of the prisoners were eventually returned to custody with Mr. Wattenberg being the last. He surrendered after a month.His U-boat was sunk in 1942.
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