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Willie Morris

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NEWS
March 18, 2008
In memory of Willie Morris McGee, (a.k.a. Awesome Dad, Pop-Pop or Slick Willie). November 22,1929 to March 14,2008. A merchant marine veteran and retiree from General Motors. He will be missed by his five daughters and sons-in-law, Rita and Denny, Joyce and George, Brenda and Ed, Angela and Ted and Ginger and Stan. He is also survived by eleven grandchildren, Kenneth and wife Emily, Sandra, Matthew, Marcus, Jeffrey, Kevin, Corey, Samantha, Troy, Gary and Shannon. Three great-grandchildren include Caroline, Ella and Madison.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 18, 2008
In memory of Willie Morris McGee, (a.k.a. Awesome Dad, Pop-Pop or Slick Willie). November 22,1929 to March 14,2008. A merchant marine veteran and retiree from General Motors. He will be missed by his five daughters and sons-in-law, Rita and Denny, Joyce and George, Brenda and Ed, Angela and Ted and Ginger and Stan. He is also survived by eleven grandchildren, Kenneth and wife Emily, Sandra, Matthew, Marcus, Jeffrey, Kevin, Corey, Samantha, Troy, Gary and Shannon. Three great-grandchildren include Caroline, Ella and Madison.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Fuson and By Ken Fuson,Special to the Sun | April 15, 2001
"Taps," by Willie Morris. Houghton Mifflin. 340 pages. $26. When Willie Morris died in August 1999, his friends, a group that apparently includes every literary light in North America, gathered to celebrate his rich life and to mourn the passing of an original voice. This book, published posthumously, will elicit those same emotions. The delight evoked by Morris' graceful and eloquent passages is muted by the sorrow of knowing that this is the last work of an author who gave us "North Toward Home" and "My Dog Skip."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Fuson and By Ken Fuson,Special to the Sun | April 15, 2001
"Taps," by Willie Morris. Houghton Mifflin. 340 pages. $26. When Willie Morris died in August 1999, his friends, a group that apparently includes every literary light in North America, gathered to celebrate his rich life and to mourn the passing of an original voice. This book, published posthumously, will elicit those same emotions. The delight evoked by Morris' graceful and eloquent passages is muted by the sorrow of knowing that this is the last work of an author who gave us "North Toward Home" and "My Dog Skip."
FEATURES
By Dan Cryer and Dan Cryer,Newsday DTC | September 9, 1993
The rise and fall of Willie Morris is a wonderfully rich if terribly sad piece of Americana. In 1967 at age 32, this whiz kid out of Mississippi was named editor of Harper's and transformed that venerable journal into the country's most exciting, best-written magazine. Month after month the reportage and essays from the likes of Norman Mailer, David Halberstam, Alfred Kazin, Larry L. King and Irving Howe cast startling and unconventional light on those turbulent times. Willie Morris, who had arrived in New York "a presumptuous and callow impostor," stood at the red-hot center of the culture.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,Special to The Sun | April 2, 1995
"My Dog Skip," by Willie Morris. 119 pages. New York: Random House. $15Like most all-American boys of his generation, Willie Morris had a dog; unlike them, he decided to write a book about it. "My Dog Skip" is the story of Morris' decade-long association with a smooth-haired fox terrier who was friendly, loyal and intelligent. If such books are your bowl of Alpo, better buckle up now -- the next few hundred words are going to be bumpy.The I-had-a-dog-once memoir is, of course, a time-honored literary genre, but this particular specimen is to books about dogs as "Annie" is to musical comedies.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | September 22, 1993
New York -- "I heard Mailer is going to be at the party tonight," Willie Morris is saying over lunch on a recent afternoon at the Algonquin Hotel. "And I heard Joan Didion is, too. It should be something, I believe."He turns to his lunch partners, Robert Kotlowitz and his second wife, JoAnne Prichard, and he smiles. Willie Morris would be experiencing an epiphany of sorts in a few hours -- a book party in his honor, with much of the New York literati attending -- and what two better people to talk about it than the people to whom he dedicated his new book?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2000
Be prepared to go home and hug your dog. Based on the memoirs of author Willie Morris (who died last August), "My Dog Skip" is an unapologetic weeper about a runt of a boy and the Jack Russell terrier who loves him. Filled with heart-tugging moments both timely (what it was like growing up in the 1940s) and timeless (ruminations on hero worship and how man's best friend earned the title), it's a charming family picture that would seem destined for classic status, if not for some unnecessary narration that only serves to make obvious sentiments the film has already made plain.
NEWS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,Staff writer | November 13, 1991
What would the oddsmakers make of these facts on the Centennial vs. Thomas Stone 3A state soccer championship Saturday?The last 16 Howard County boys soccer teams to reach the state playoffs have won state titles. County teams have won 17 state titles in all, and only one county team has lost a state final -- the 1978 Oakland Mills team. Centennial has won three, the last in 1987.Thomas Stone has lost five state semifinals, most recently in 1989, and is making its first championship game appearance.
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | September 15, 1994
Shane Dougherty scored the game-winner on an assist from Tod Herskovitz in the second overtime to lead host Maryland (3-1-0) to a 4-2 victory over American (3-2-1) in men's soccer yesterday.* Salisbury State 3, Catholic 0: Junior forward Willie Morris scored a goal and had an assist to lead Salisbury State (3-0, 2-0) past host Catholic (1-1, 0-1).* Georgetown 1, Mount St. Mary's 0: Georgetown's Ben McKnight scored midway through the first half to lift the host Hoyas (4-1) past Mount St. Mary's (2-2)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2000
Be prepared to go home and hug your dog. Based on the memoirs of author Willie Morris (who died last August), "My Dog Skip" is an unapologetic weeper about a runt of a boy and the Jack Russell terrier who loves him. Filled with heart-tugging moments both timely (what it was like growing up in the 1940s) and timeless (ruminations on hero worship and how man's best friend earned the title), it's a charming family picture that would seem destined for classic status, if not for some unnecessary narration that only serves to make obvious sentiments the film has already made plain.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,Special to The Sun | April 2, 1995
"My Dog Skip," by Willie Morris. 119 pages. New York: Random House. $15Like most all-American boys of his generation, Willie Morris had a dog; unlike them, he decided to write a book about it. "My Dog Skip" is the story of Morris' decade-long association with a smooth-haired fox terrier who was friendly, loyal and intelligent. If such books are your bowl of Alpo, better buckle up now -- the next few hundred words are going to be bumpy.The I-had-a-dog-once memoir is, of course, a time-honored literary genre, but this particular specimen is to books about dogs as "Annie" is to musical comedies.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | September 22, 1993
New York -- "I heard Mailer is going to be at the party tonight," Willie Morris is saying over lunch on a recent afternoon at the Algonquin Hotel. "And I heard Joan Didion is, too. It should be something, I believe."He turns to his lunch partners, Robert Kotlowitz and his second wife, JoAnne Prichard, and he smiles. Willie Morris would be experiencing an epiphany of sorts in a few hours -- a book party in his honor, with much of the New York literati attending -- and what two better people to talk about it than the people to whom he dedicated his new book?
FEATURES
By Dan Cryer and Dan Cryer,Newsday DTC | September 9, 1993
The rise and fall of Willie Morris is a wonderfully rich if terribly sad piece of Americana. In 1967 at age 32, this whiz kid out of Mississippi was named editor of Harper's and transformed that venerable journal into the country's most exciting, best-written magazine. Month after month the reportage and essays from the likes of Norman Mailer, David Halberstam, Alfred Kazin, Larry L. King and Irving Howe cast startling and unconventional light on those turbulent times. Willie Morris, who had arrived in New York "a presumptuous and callow impostor," stood at the red-hot center of the culture.
NEWS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,Staff writer | November 13, 1991
What would the oddsmakers make of these facts on the Centennial vs. Thomas Stone 3A state soccer championship Saturday?The last 16 Howard County boys soccer teams to reach the state playoffs have won state titles. County teams have won 17 state titles in all, and only one county team has lost a state final -- the 1978 Oakland Mills team. Centennial has won three, the last in 1987.Thomas Stone has lost five state semifinals, most recently in 1989, and is making its first championship game appearance.
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | September 12, 1994
Top-ranked Virginia scored three times in the second half to defeat Maryland, 4-2, yesterday in a men's soccer game at Charlottesville, Va.Nate Friends had a goal and an assist to lead the Cavaliers (3-1).Terps senior Malcolm Gillian (Oakland Mills) scored 28:23 into the game to tie the game at 1.Virginia ended a 40-minute scoreless stretch on a goal by Billy Walsh.* Loyola 5, St. Peter's 0: Five players scored to lead Loyola (4-0) past St. Peter's (0-4) in a second-round game of the Loyola Budweiser tournament.
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports DeLAND, Fla | October 23, 1993
DeLAND, Fla. -- J. J. Kremer scored two goals as UMBC (6-0-1) extended its unbeaten streak to seven, defeating Central Florida (2-8-1), 5-4, in the first round of the Florida Invitational Cup at Stetson University.Kremer scored the game-opener 5:43 into the first and scored at 69:38 of the second half. Tim Ryerson broke the halftime tie 2:29 into the second half, giving UMBC a 2-1 advantage and the lead for good.UMBC 1 4 -- 5Central Florida 1 3 -- 4Goals: UMBC--Kremer 2, Ryerson, Elliott, Bailey; CF--Marin, Soistman, Hillis, Wall.
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